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See detailAssessment of non-genetic parameters of the racing performances of Arabian and Thoroughbred horses in Algeria
Tennah, Safia ULg; Kafidi, Nacer; Antoine-Moussiaux, Nicolas ULg et al

in African Journal of Biotechnology (2012)

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See detailAssessment of Non-Lethal Projectile Head Impacts
Oukara, Amar ULg

Doctoral thesis (2015)

Anti-personnel Non-Lethal Weapons (NLW) are used to impart sufficient effect onto a person in order to deter uncivil, suspect or hazardous behaviour with a low prob- ability of permanent or fatal injury ... [more ▼]

Anti-personnel Non-Lethal Weapons (NLW) are used to impart sufficient effect onto a person in order to deter uncivil, suspect or hazardous behaviour with a low prob- ability of permanent or fatal injury. They appear to be suitable for many law enforcement missions and to a certain extent to the military forces. In fact, in many situations of conflict, where the army and civil police are involved, the use of such weapons can ensure a minimal risk of collateral damage. The most used NLW are Kinetic Energy Non-Lethal Weapons (KENLW) that involve the shooting of a de- formable or breakable projectile with masses between 5 g to 140 g at initial velocities between 70 m/s and 160 m/s. Practically, KENLW are not used without risk for the targeted persons. The head zone represents the most critical part of the human body regarding non-lethal projectile impacts. The inflicted injuries can be severe and sometimes lead to death. The experts in the field should identify the limits in which KENLW should be effective without causing permanent or fatal injuries. Therefore, assessment methods should be developed in order to predict the injury risk of non-lethal head impacts. The present thesis proposes the development of three different approaches allowing the assessment of the non-lethal head impacts. The first approach named FW (Force wall) method has been developed at DGA (Direction Générale de l’Armement) - France. For a benchmark projectile, this method links the maximum impact head force to the maximum impact force mea- sured on a supposedly infinitely rigid structure, equipped with a piezoelectric force sensor. Three lesional thresholds: unconsciousness, meningeal damage and bone damage with coma are used. The FW method proposes the extension of the bench- mark projectile results to other projectiles using the assumption: two different pro- jectiles producing the same force on a rigid structure, will have the same effects on the head. This method is applied in the present thesis for different projectiles using a specific experimental setup. Different improvements have been achieved regarding the frequency analysis of the rigid structure and the quantification of uncertainties of the FW method. These improvements represent some original contributions of the present thesis.The second approach concerns the use of a mechanical surrogate in order to predict the maximum impact head force. The mechanical surrogate involved in the present study is BLSH (Ballistics Load Sensing Headform). Different tests have been performed using no less than eight commercial projectiles. The third approach uses numerical simulations with a validated FEHM (Fi- nite Element Head Model). SUFEHM (Strasbourg University Finite Element Head Model) is considered in the present thesis. The model offers the possibility to pre- dict head injuries using other parameters than the maximum impact head force: the strain energy and the Von Mises stress. A specific method is proposed in order to develop the FE (Finite Element) models of non-lethal projectiles. Six FE models of projectiles are used for the numerical simulations. Results show a good agreement between the three methods for the benchmark projectile. The extension of the FW method for other projectiles can be performed with some limitations mentioned in the present document. Moreover, there is a good agreement between BLSH and SUFEHM for all studied projectiles. Different correlations between the maximum impact head force and other criteria are also proposed in order to include them in the non-lethal head impact injury prediction. Ultimately, the present work proposes assessment methods for non-lethal projec- tile head impacts. The different details of these methods are given in the present document. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of nonlinear system identification methods using the SmallSat spacecraft structure
Kerschen, Gaëtan ULg; Soula, L.; Vergniaud, J.B. et al

in Proceedings of the 29th International Modal Analysis Conference (2011)

In this paper, several techniques for nonlinear system identification are applied to a real-world structure, the SmallSat spacecraft structure developed by EADS-Astrium. This composite structure comprises ... [more ▼]

In this paper, several techniques for nonlinear system identification are applied to a real-world structure, the SmallSat spacecraft structure developed by EADS-Astrium. This composite structure comprises two vibration isolation systems, one of which possesses mechanical stops. The loading case considered in the present study is a random (local) excitation. A careful progression through the different steps of the system identification process, namely detection, characterization and parameter estimation, is carried out. Different methods are applied to data resulting from numerical experiments, without having access to the finite element model which generated these data. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of nuclear totipotency of fetal bovine diploid germ cells by nuclear transfer.
Moens, A.; Chesne, P.; Delhaise, F. et al

in Theriogenology (1996), 46(5), 871-80

Nuclear transfer was used to study nuclear reprogramming of fetal diploid bovine germ cells collected at two stages of the fetal development. In the first case, germ cells of both sexes were collected ... [more ▼]

Nuclear transfer was used to study nuclear reprogramming of fetal diploid bovine germ cells collected at two stages of the fetal development. In the first case, germ cells of both sexes were collected during their period of intragonadal mitotic multiplication at 48 days post coitum (d.p.c.). In the second case, only male germ cells were collected after this period, between 105 and 185 d.p.c. Isolated germ cells were fused with enucleated oocytes. Reconstituted embryos were cultured in vitro and those reaching the compacted morula or blastocyst stage were transferred into synchronous recipient heifers. Of 511 reconstituted embryos with 48 d.p.c. germ cells (309 males and 202 females), 48% (247/511 ) cleaved; 2.7% (14/511 ) reached the compacted morula stage and 8 of them the blastocyst stage (1.6%). No difference was observed between sexes. All 14 compacted morulae/blastocysts were transferred into 6 recipients and one pregnancy was initiated. This recipient was slaughtered at Day 35 and an abnormal conceptus (extended trophectoderm and degenerated embryo) was collected. Its male sex, genetically determined, corresponded to that of donor fetus. Of 380 reconstituted embryos with male 105 to 185 d.p.c. germ cells, 72.1% (274/380 ) cleaved, 2.1% (8 380 ) reached the compact morula stage and 7 of these the blastocyst stage (1.8%). Three blastocysts and one morula were transferred into 4 recipients. Two became pregnant at Day 21 but only one at Day 35 which aborted around Day 40. Our results show that the nucleus of diploid bovine germ cells of both sexes can be reprogrammed. However, in the absence of further development of these reconstituted embryos, nuclear totipotency of bovine diploid germ cells remains to be evidenced. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of nutrition related knowledge, skills ans attitudes
de Landsheere, Gilbert ULg

in Schürch, B. (Ed.) Evaluation of nutrition education in third world communities (1983)

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See detailAssessment of olfactory function in male and female aromatase knockout (ArKO) mice
Pierman, S.; Douhard, Quentin ULg; Balthazart, Jacques ULg et al

in Hormones & Behavior (2004, June), 46(1), 99

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See detailAssessment of osteoporosis disease burden in countries currently lacking such studies
Ben Sedrine, Wafa ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Radican, L et al

in BONE (1998), 23(S5), 306

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See detailAssessment of osteoporosis in daily clinical practice
Bosio-Le Goux, B.; Augendre-Ferrante, B.; Tancredi, Annalisa ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2003, November), 14(Suppl. 7), 86

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See detailAssessment of oviposition site quality by aphidophagous hoverflies: reaction to conspecific larvae
Almohamad, Raki; Verheggen, François ULg; Francis, Frédéric ULg et al

in Animal Behaviour (2010), 79

Aphidophagous predators adapt their foraging behaviour to the presence of conspecific and heterospecific larvae. We studied the effect of the presence of conspecific larvae and their tracks on the ... [more ▼]

Aphidophagous predators adapt their foraging behaviour to the presence of conspecific and heterospecific larvae. We studied the effect of the presence of conspecific larvae and their tracks on the oviposition site selection of an aphid-specific predator, Episyrphus balteatus DeGeer (Diptera: Syrphidae), in two-choice experiments using a leaf disc bioassay. Gas chromatography – mass spectrometry analysis was used to identify the volatile chemicals released from odour extracts of E. balteatus larval tracks. The behavioural effects of these volatile substances on hoverfly females were also evaluated. Our experiments demonstrated that E. balteatus females were deterred from ovipositing when presented with a Vicia faba leaf with aphids and conspecific larvae. The oviposition-deterring stimulus was also active when females were presented with a leaf that contained conspecific larval tracks. A mixture of chemical compounds was found in the volatile pattern of odour extracts of larval tracks. The main volatile chemicals were 3-methylbutanoic acid, 2-methylbutanoic acid, 2-methylpropanoic acid, 3-hydroxy- 2-butanone, hexanoic acid and phenol. Females also laid significantly fewer eggs in response to odorant volatiles emitted from larval extracts. These results highlight that predatory hoverfly females avoid ovipositing in aphid colonies in which conspecific larvae or their tracks are already present, suggesting that this behaviour constitutes a strategy that enables females to optimize their oviposition site and reduce competition suffered by their offspring. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of pain in herpes zoster: lessons learned from antiviral trials
Dworkin, R. H.; Carrington, D.; Cunningham, A. et al

in Antiviral Research (1997), 33(2), 73-85

Pain typically accompanies acute herpes zoster and, in a proportion of patients, it persists well beyond rash healing. Pain must therefore be analyzed in trials of antiviral agents in herpes zoster, but ... [more ▼]

Pain typically accompanies acute herpes zoster and, in a proportion of patients, it persists well beyond rash healing. Pain must therefore be analyzed in trials of antiviral agents in herpes zoster, but different methods have been used to analyze pain in recent published trials. These reports are reviewed and their methodological strengths and weaknesses examined. Based on this review, recommendations for the design and analysis of future trials of antiviral agents in herpes zoster are proposed. The principal recommendation is that antiviral efficacy should be evaluated both by distinguishing post-herpetic neuralgia from acute pain and by considering pain as a continuum. The primary endpoint should address both the prevalence and duration of post-herpetic neuralgia and should be examined in those patients who have post-herpetic neuralgia. Adopting the proposed recommendations in design and analysis of future trials should facilitate comparison across trials of the efficacy of antiviral agents in the treatment of herpes zoster. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of partial coalescence in whippable oil-in-water food emulsions
Petrut, Raul Flaviu ULg; Danthine, Sabine ULg; Blecker, Christophe ULg

in Advances in Colloid and Interface Science (2016), (229), 25-33

Partial coalescence influences to a great extent the properties of final food products such as ice cream and whipped toppings. In return, the partial coalescence occurrence and development are conditioned ... [more ▼]

Partial coalescence influences to a great extent the properties of final food products such as ice cream and whipped toppings. In return, the partial coalescence occurrence and development are conditioned, in such systems, by the emulsion's intrinsic properties (e.g. solid fat content, fat crystal shape and size), formulation (e.g. protein content, surfactants presence) and extrinsic factors (e.g. cooling rate, shearing). A set of methods is available for partial coalescence investigation and quantification. These methods are critically reviewed in this paper, balancing the weaknesses of themethods in terms of structure alteration (for turbidity, dye dilution, etc.) and assumptions made for mathematical models (for particle size determination) with their advantages (good repeatability, high sensitivity, etc.).With the methods proposed in literature, the partial coalescence investigations can be conducted quantitatively and/or qualitatively. Good correlation were observed between some of the quantitative methods such as dye dilution, calorimetry, fat particle size;while a poor correlation was found in the case of solvent extraction method with other quantitativemethods. The most suitableway for partial coalescence quantification was implied to be the fat particle size method, which would give results with a high degree of confidence if used in combination with a microscopic technique for the confirmation of partial coalescence as the main destabilization mechanism. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of Patient Comfort During Palliative Sedation: Is it always Reliable?
Deschepper, R; Bilsen, J; Laureys, Steven ULg

in Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine (2014)

"When death knocks at the door of our ward, we do not easily open the door”, an intensivist once said. In the intensive care unit (ICU) and emergency department, care is strongly focused on cure and ... [more ▼]

"When death knocks at the door of our ward, we do not easily open the door”, an intensivist once said. In the intensive care unit (ICU) and emergency department, care is strongly focused on cure and resuscitation. Notwithstanding the technological progress made in intensive and emergency medicine, a substantial number of the patients admitted to the ICU cannot be saved. In these cases, it is important to make a timely shift from curative efforts to palliative care, so that futile and burdensome interventions can be avoided. When death becomes imminent, a major concern of the family members and caregivers is to assure maximal comfort during the dying process. A central aspect of good end-of-life care is to keep the patient, as much as possible, free of pain and other kinds of distress. However, many critically ill patients often suffer from symptoms such as pain and delirium. More than 50 % of critically ill patients in the ICU experience moderate to severe pain and pain in critically ill patients often remains untreated [1]. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of patient-led or physician-driven continuous glucose monitoring in patients with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes using basal-bolus insulin regimens: a 1-year multicenter study.
Riveline, Jean-Pierre; Schaepelynck, Pauline; Chaillous, Lucy et al

in Diabetes care (2012), 35(5), 965-71

OBJECTIVE: The benefits of real-time continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) have been demonstrated in patients with type 1 diabetes. Our aim was to compare the effect of two modes of use of CGM, patient led ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: The benefits of real-time continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) have been demonstrated in patients with type 1 diabetes. Our aim was to compare the effect of two modes of use of CGM, patient led or physician driven, for 1 year in subjects with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Patients with type 1 diabetes aged 8-60 years with HbA(1c) >/= 8% were randomly assigned to three groups (1:1:1). Outcomes for glucose control were assessed at 1 year for two modes of CGM (group 1: patient led; group 2: physician driven) versus conventional self-monitoring of blood glucose (group 3: control). RESULTS: A total of 257 subjects with type 1 diabetes underwent screening. Of these, 197 were randomized, with 178 patients completing the study (age: 36 +/- 14 years; HbA(1c): 8.9 +/- 0.9%). HbA(1c) improved similarly in both CGM groups and was reduced compared with the control group (group 1 vs. group 3: -0.52%, P = 0.0006; group 2 vs. group 3: -0.47%, P = 0.0008; groups 1 + 2 vs. group 3: -0.50%, P < 0.0001). The incidence of hypoglycemia was similar in the three groups. Patient SF-36 questionnaire physical health score improved in both experimental CGM groups (P = 0.004). Sensor consumption was 34% lower in group 2 than in group 1 (median [Q1-Q3] consumption: group 1: 3.42/month [2.20-3.91] vs. group 2: 2.25/month [1.27-2.99], P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Both patient-led and physician-driven CGM provide similar long-term improvement in glucose control in patients with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes, but the physician-driven CGM mode used fewer sensors. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of periodic homogenisation-based multi-scale computational schemes for quasi-brittle structural failure
Mercatoris, Benoît ULg; Massart, T. J.

in Computational Plasticity X - Fundamentals and Applications (2009)

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See detailAssessment of periodic homogenization-based multiscale computational schemes for quasi-brittle structural failure
Mercatoris, Benoît ULg; Massart, T. J.

in International Journal for Multiscale Computational Engineering (2009), 7(2), 153-170

New methods for the modeling of structural failure by means of multiscale approaches were recently proposed, in which the structural description involves coarse-scale discontinuities, the behavior of ... [more ▼]

New methods for the modeling of structural failure by means of multiscale approaches were recently proposed, in which the structural description involves coarse-scale discontinuities, the behavior of which is fed by representative volume element (RVE) computations. Their main asset consists in identifying the material response, including the failure behavior of the material, from fine-scale material parameters and computations. One of the distinctions between the available approaches relates to the boundary conditions applied on the RVE. The methods based on classical computational homogenization usually make use of periodic boundary conditions. This assumption remains a priori debatable for the localized behavior of quasi-brittle materials. For the particular case of periodic materials (masonry), the level of approximation induced by the periodic assumption is scrutinized here. A new displacement discontinuity-enhanced-scale transition is therefore outlined based on energetic consistency requirements. The corresponding multiscale framework results are compared to complete fine-scale modeling results used as a reference, showing a good agreement in terms of limit load, and in terms of failure mechanisms both at the fine-scale and at the overall structural level. © 2008 by Begell House, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of pesticide application method efficiency by high-speed image analysis
Massinon, Mathieu ULg; Denis, Thierry; Perriot, Benjamin et al

Conference (2012, July 08)

This paper investigates if increased blackgrass weeding efficiency by reduced volume per hectare observed during 2010 Arvalis field trials may be related to increased pesticide application method ... [more ▼]

This paper investigates if increased blackgrass weeding efficiency by reduced volume per hectare observed during 2010 Arvalis field trials may be related to increased pesticide application method efficiency. Retention on blackgrass leaves was assessed by an image analysis method. The setup consists of a high-speed camera shooting drop impact on horizontal leaf target. An herbicide (Archipel® [125 g/ha] + Actirob® [1 l/ha]) was sprayed at the usual volume of 150 l/ha and at a reduced volume of 65 l/ha. Adjuvants use (Epsotop® [1%] + Heliosol® [0.5%]) was also evaluated at 65 l/ha to highlight the effect of mixture surface tension modification. Drop properties before impact were extracted by image analysis and a phase diagram derived. Volumetric proportions of impact types are determined inside 11 energy classes to assess the effect of formulation and application method. The volume median diameter (VMD) before impact was slightly decreased by the reduction to 65 l/ha because of nozzle and pressure changes and also by the use of the adjuvants leading to the reduction of surface tension. Without adjuvants the reduction to 65l/ha increased the proportion of adhesion while rebound remained unchanged and fragmentation decreased. With adjuvants, drop fragmentation occurs for a lower energy class but the proportion of fragmentation also decreases with because of reduced VMD. A slight effect on the transitions between impact classes was observed because of formulation concentration change at reduced volume/hectare. A major effect of adjuvants on retention was highlighted as bouncing disappeared. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of pfcrt 72-76 haplotypes eight years after chloroquine withdrawal in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
Mvumbi, Dieudonné; BOREUX, Raphaël ULg; SACHELI, Rosalie ULg et al

in Malaria Journal (2013), 12

BACKGROUND: In 2001, the World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended the use of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) as the first-line treatment of uncomplicated malaria cases, as monotherapies ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: In 2001, the World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended the use of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) as the first-line treatment of uncomplicated malaria cases, as monotherapies had become ineffective in many parts of the world. As a result, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) withdrew chloroquine (CQ) from its malaria treatment policy in 2002 and an artesunate (AS)-amodiaquine (AQ) combination became the ACT of choice in DRC in 2005. AQ-resistance (AQR) has been reported in several parts of the world and mutations in codons 72-76 of the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter (pfcrt) gene have been strongly correlated with resistance, especially mutations encoding the SVMNT haplotype. This haplotype was first identified in Southeast Asia and South America but was recently reported in two African countries neighbouring DRC. These facts raised two questions: the first about the evolution of CQ resistance (CQR) in DRC and the second about the presence of the SVMNT haplotype, which would compromise the use of AQ as a partner drug for ACT. METHODS: A total of 213 thick blood films were randomly collected in 2010 from a paediatric clinic in Kinshasa, DRC. Microscopy controls and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were performed for Plasmodium species identification. Haplotypes of the pfcrt gene were determined by sequencing. RESULTS: The K76T mutation was detected in 145 out of 198 P. falciparum-positive samples (73.2%).In these 145 resistant strains, only the CVIET haplotype was detected. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first to assess the molecular markers of resistance to CQ and AQ after the introduction of ACT in DRC. The results suggest first that CQR is decreasing, as wild-type pfcrt haplotypes were found in only 26.8% of the samples and secondly that the SVMNT haplotype is not yet present in Kinshasa, suggesting that AQ remains valid as a partner drug for ACT in this region. [less ▲]

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