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See detailBehavioural and physiological responses of Gammarus fossarum (Crustacea Amphipoda) exposed to silver
Arce Funck, Julio; Danger, Michael; Gismondi, Eric ULg et al

in Aquatic Toxicology (2013), 142-143

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See detailBehavioural Ecology of Bonobos (Pan paniscus) in the Forest-Savannah Mosaics of Western Democratic Republic of Congo
Vimond, Marie; Serckx, Adeline ULg; Beudels-Jamar, Roseline et al

in Folia Primatologica : International Journal of Primatology = Internationale Zeitschrift für Primatologie = Journal international de Primatologie (2013)

The long-term survival of the Endangered bonobo (IUCN, 2012) will depend on well thought out conservation programmes that need to be built both upon the species’ ecological requirements and local socio ... [more ▼]

The long-term survival of the Endangered bonobo (IUCN, 2012) will depend on well thought out conservation programmes that need to be built both upon the species’ ecological requirements and local socio-economics realities. Yet there is still a lot to find out, including information on the species geographical distribution. In 2005, the presence of a western population was confirmed in the forest-savannah mosaic in the south-western part of the Lake Tumba Landscape. With the exception of an early study carried out in Lukuru, the species is mainly known from lowland rainforest research sites in the Cuvette Centrale. The western forest-savannah mosaic is an ecotone with a marked seasonal pattern, a high variability of habitats and monthly variations in fruit production. All this leads to spatio-temporal variation of food availability. In order to increase studies and monitoring of this unique population, WWF initiated a habituation process of two groups of bonobos 6 years ago. The groups are now semi-habituated, making the collection of direct daily observations possible. Our objective is to describe the behavioural strategies developed by this population in order to cope with spatio-temporal variations of food availability. This will be approached by identifying daily activity, ranging and grouping patterns, in order to understand how they affect social structure. It should also allow us to define the use of savannahs. Our findings will help determine specific conservations measures for this endangered species. [less ▲]

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See detailBEHAVIOURAL ECOLOGY OF LONG-TAILED MACAQUES IN THE CONTEXT OF URBAN COMMENSALISM: A COMPARISON STUDY BETWEEN BANGKOK (THAILAND) AND BALI (INDONESIA)
Brotcorne, Fany ULg; Huynen, Marie-Claude ULg; Beudels-Jamar, Roseline et al

Poster (2010, September 16)

The quest for coexistence with non-human primates requires an extensive analysis of the growing commen-salism phenomenon. The long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis), a very successful commensal species ... [more ▼]

The quest for coexistence with non-human primates requires an extensive analysis of the growing commen-salism phenomenon. The long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis), a very successful commensal species, adapts remarkably to anthropogenic habitats. Studies in several Asian locations raised the issue of hu-man-macaque conflict related to human health and safety as well as to conservation threats on macaques. Here, we aimed at assessing the anthropogenic impact (human presence and provisioning frequency) on the eco-behavioural profile of two populations living commensally with humans in Bangkok (Thailand) and Ubud (Padangtegal, Bali). We used an identical focal and scan sampling methodology during two three-month study periods in 2007 (Bangkok) and 2009 (Bali). Despite different ecological conditions, the two populations showed a strongly similar activity budget. Resting was the most common activity (40% vs. 35%), followed by feeding (28% vs. 24%), moving (15% vs. 14%) and affiliations (14% vs. 19%). Agonistic behaviours were slightly more frequent in Bali (0.6% vs. 3.0%), maybe due to higher population density (8.5/ha vs. 14.2/ha). Contrary to previous studies, we did not find any impact of provisioning on agonistic interactions. Concerning diet composition, proportions of natural vs. provisioned food and proportions of various food categories were consistent between the two sites. Since the ecological conditions were different, the anthropogenic factors are likely to explain the strong consistency in eco-behavioural profile of the two populations. Further studies are planned on three other populations to assess the specific impact of commensalism on behavioural ecology and derive the implications for long term population trends. [less ▲]

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See detailBehavioural ecotoxicology in amphibians: development of biomarkers
Denoël, Mathieu ULg

Conference (2011, October 25)

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See detailBehavioural effects of a long-term treatment with meprobamate in cats
Xhenseval, B.; Richelle, Marc ULg

in International Journal of Neuropharmacology (1965), 4

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See detailBehavioural effects of approach-avoidance motivational conflicts in Zebrafish: testing an Attentional Control Model on videotracked swimming activity
Ylieff, Marc ULg; Froidbise, Sophie; Jacquet, Laurie et al

Poster (2012, July 05)

Motivational conflicts have been thoroughly studied in birds and mammals over the last decades, but their investigation has remained anecdotic with respect to fish. However, recent researches reveal that ... [more ▼]

Motivational conflicts have been thoroughly studied in birds and mammals over the last decades, but their investigation has remained anecdotic with respect to fish. However, recent researches reveal that, emotion and cognition also play a pivotal role in the expression of fish behaviour. Fish exhibit fear, long-term memory, attentional and learning capacities that are comparable with those of other vertebrates, including nonhuman primates. Thus, fish can be expected to manage motivational conflicts using cognitive similar resources. As many other teleost fishes, zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a good candidate to investigate the behavioural effects of approach–avoidance conflicts because of its genetic and neurophysiological proximity with “higher” vertebrates. The present study aims to determine how Zebrafish reacted to threats of different magnitude (low vs. high) following the delivery of food. [less ▲]

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See detailBehavioural impact of food presentation: How to find an ideal number od weaned pigs per feeding place?
Laitat, Martine ULg; Vandenheede, Marc ULg; Desiron, Alain et al

in Kirkwood, J. K.; Roberts, E. A.; Vickery, S. (Eds.) Proceedings of the Universities Federation for Animal Welfare (2004)

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (1 ULg)
See detailBehavioural impacts of gender stereotype level at adolescence ” .
Gavray, Claire ULg

Conference (2009, October 10)

Survey 2009 on adolescents' stereotypes (900 Belgian pupils). Links can be done between , on one hand, stereotyped faiths and attitudes and, on a other hand, the experience of violence, as victim and ... [more ▼]

Survey 2009 on adolescents' stereotypes (900 Belgian pupils). Links can be done between , on one hand, stereotyped faiths and attitudes and, on a other hand, the experience of violence, as victim and perpetrator. It's true for boys and girls but not with the same profile. Comparisons can be done with ISRD results ( Self-related Delinquency data) [less ▲]

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See detailBehavioural impacts of gender stereotypes at adolescence
Gavray, Claire ULg

Conference (2009, September 11)

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See detailBehavioural response of southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) to anthropogenic approaches in Bahía San Antonio, Río Negro Argentina
Cammareri, Alejandro; Vermeulen, Els ULg

in Report to the International Whaling Commission (2010)

The behavioural response of southern right whales (SRWs) to human approaches was studied in Bahia San Antonio, Río Negro Argentina, to obtain essential information for the evaluation of a recent ... [more ▼]

The behavioural response of southern right whales (SRWs) to human approaches was studied in Bahia San Antonio, Río Negro Argentina, to obtain essential information for the evaluation of a recent authorized whale-based tourism and the implementation of accurate regulations and conservation measurements. A total of 50 SRW groups were approached with a small zodiac during the whale-seasons (June-October) of 2008 and 2009, accounting for a total of 39h of behavioural observations. The approaches occurred in a slow and controlled way up to a minimum distance of 100m. A focal animal observation (instantaneous point sample) was used to record three mutual exclusive behavioural states: rest, travel and socializing and/or aerial activity. Groups (chosen ad random) consisted out of solitary animals (0.52), Surface Active Groups (SAG; 0.32) and non-SAGs (0.13). Nevertheless, because of the low amount of data, up to now all behavioural responses were analysed regardless group composition. Results indicated that whales continued travelling during an approach, but doubled their time resting after an approach had finished (22% → 40%) and decreased drastically their time socializing or aerially active (21% → 2%). Although the probability that a whale remained in a social/aerially active behaviour when affected by anthropogenic approaches decreased notably (-22%), no significant effect could be found up to now (Z-test for 2 proportions, p>0.05), probably due to the relative small dataset. Nevertheless, the apparent change in SRW social behaviour requires urgently more detailed information to implement conservation strategies regulating adequately the commercial whale-based tourism in the area. [less ▲]

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See detailBehavioural study of hybridization between Barbus barbus and Barbus meridionalis
Poncin, Pascal ULg; Jeandarme, J.; Berrebi, P.

in Journal of Fish Biology (1994), 45

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See detailBehavioural study of polyandrous spawning in Blicca bjoerkna under a controlled environment.
Poncin, Pascal ULg; Termol, C.; Nzau Matondo, Billy et al

in Folia Zoological (2010), 59(3)

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See detailBehavioural tactics and spawning activity of rheophilic cyprinids radio-tracked in the transition zone between natural flow and minimum flow conditions
Ovidio, Michaël ULg; Guillaume, Nicolas; Hallot, Eric ULg et al

Conference (2007, June)

Using water resources for hydro-electricity production influences and limits the quality and quantity of habitat available for use by resident fishes. Changes in the fish community structure after setting ... [more ▼]

Using water resources for hydro-electricity production influences and limits the quality and quantity of habitat available for use by resident fishes. Changes in the fish community structure after setting minimum flow conditions have been more frequently studied than the behavioural adaptations of fish living in the vicinity of the disturbed river section. In the River Amblève (River Meuse basin, Belgium), a hydraulic power plant bypasses the river over a length of 10 km. Adult nase Chondrostoma nasus (n=10) and barbel Barbus barbus (n=8) were captured in the restitution zone of the turbinated flow several weeks before their reproduction periods. They were equipped with implant radio transmitters and manually and intensively tracked over several months to more than 1 year. The environmental conditions (water temperature and flow) as well as the geomorphology of the river were compared in both natural and flow-regulated sections. Nase and barbel demonstrated the capacity to map their contrasted environment and adapted their space and habitat utilisation as well as the choice of their spawning sites in relation with their specific biological characteristics and the environmental variations. The results are discussed in the context of the management of fish movements in flow-regulated rivers. [less ▲]

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See detailBehavioural techniques
Richelle, Marc ULg; Dallemagne, M. J.

in Bacq, Z. M. (Ed.) Fundamentals of biochemical pharmacology (1970)

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See detailBehaviours Associated with Acoustic Communication in Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)
Longrie, Nicolas; Poncin, Pascal ULg; Denoël, Mathieu ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(4), 61467

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See detailBehind Rossmo's assumptions: further hypotheses to make geographic profiling more operational
Trotta, Marie ULg

Conference (2011, November 03)

Funded by the Belgian National research fund (FRS-FNRS), I am currently collaborating with several services of the federal police of Belgium (strategic, operational and behavioural analysts) to develop ... [more ▼]

Funded by the Belgian National research fund (FRS-FNRS), I am currently collaborating with several services of the federal police of Belgium (strategic, operational and behavioural analysts) to develop operational techniques to implement geographic profiling – including temporal aspects of crime scene – on the Belgian territory. Belgium is characterized by a small and highly populated territory with a complex road network; which require more concerns about its geographical features than the regular grids of American cities. <br /> <br />From an operational perspective, few studies have focused on the conditions favouring the application of GP. Rossmo defined five criteria for effective likelihood surface, but these criteria are often difficult to verify with the data gathered during the investigations. This presentation proposes to study the relationships between those applicability hypotheses, crime types, and spatio-temporal aspects of the crime in order to better predict the surface effectiveness. <br /> <br />Then, we discuss the difficulty to meet those assumptions for serial rapes in Belgium. Non-uniform pattern and multiple residences for offenders are some of the factors hampering those assumptions. <br /> <br />An unsolved case of rapes submitted by the police illustrates how a GP reasoning is still possible when Rossmo’s criteria are not met. The objective was to delineate a priority area around crime locations for DNA testing as the offender was assumed to be local. The series presents a pattern focusing on two different city centers. For this reason, the likelihood surface was generated under a different assumption than the classical distance decay. Indeed, our analysis of the crimes pattern in relation to the road network points out a new hypothesis for the offender’s spatial behaviour: spatial consistency in travelled distances to commit the crimes instead of a distance decay function. <br /> <br />This hypothesis was supported by an analysis of the ‘neutrality’ of the series crime locations. Brantingham distinguished crime generators/attractors from neutral places as a function of the attractiveness of place. According to him, distance decay functions can only be applied to neutral places. In our series, it appears that only one location was located in rural area, in a very unattractive place for rapes. By contrast, the others were located in the city centers or near night clubs. We concluded that there was a high probability for the offender to come from this village. Subsequent DNA analyses of the residents of that village confirmed our hypothesis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 67 (18 ULg)