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See detailAttraction thresholds and sex discrimination of urinary odorants in male and female aromatase knockout (ArKO) mice
Pierman, S.; Douhard, Quentin ULg; Balthazart, Jacques ULg et al

in Hormones & Behavior (2006), 49(1), 96-104

We previously found that both male and female aromatase knockout (ArKO) mice, which cannot synthesize estrogens due to a targeted mutation of the aromatase gene, showed less investigation of volatile body ... [more ▼]

We previously found that both male and female aromatase knockout (ArKO) mice, which cannot synthesize estrogens due to a targeted mutation of the aromatase gene, showed less investigation of volatile body odors from anesthetized conspecifics of both sexes in Y-maze tests. We now ask whether ArKO mice are in fact capable of discriminating between and/or responding to volatile odors. Using habituation/dishabituation tests, we found that gonadectomized ArKO and wild-type (WT) mice of both sexes, which were tested without any sex hormone replacement, reliably distinguished between undiluted volatile urinary odors of either adult males or estrous females versus deionized water as well as between these two urinary odors themselves. However, ArKO mice of both sexes were less motivated than WT controls to investigate same-sex odors when they were presented last in the sequence of stimuli. In a second experiment, we compared the ability of ArKO and WT mice to respond to decreasing concentrations of either male or female urinary odors. We found a clear-cut sex difference in urinary odor attraction thresholds among WT mice: WT males failed to respond to urine dilutions higher than 1:20 by volume, whereas WT females continued to respond to urine dilutions up to 1:80. Male ArKO mice resembled WT females in their ability to respond to lower concentrations of urinary odors, raising the possibility that the observed sex difference among WT mice in urine attraction thresholds results from the perinatal actions of estrogen in the male nervous system. Female ArKO mice failed to show significant dishabituation responses to two (1:20 and 1:80) dilutions of female urine, perhaps, again, because of a reduced motivation to investigate less salient, same-sex urinary odors. Previously observed deficits in the preference of ArKO male and female mice to approach volatile body odors from conspecifics of either sex cannot be attributed to an inability of ArKO subjects to discriminate these odors according to sex but instead may reflect a deficient motivation to approach same-sex odors, especially when their concentration is low. [less ▲]

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See detailAttraction, narration et culture de classe. Trois voyages dans la mine
Mélon, Marc-Emmanuel ULg

in Revue belge du cinéma (1995), 38-39

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See detailAttribution of Cysteine Connectivities in small toxins - New Prospects Based on Partial Oxidation/Reduction Experiments and Ion-Mobility Mass Spectrometry
Quinton, Loïc ULg; Massonnet, Philippe ULg; Echterbille, Julien ULg et al

Conference (2013, December)

Disulfide bonds are post-translational modifications often found in biological compounds and especially in animal toxins. Disulfide bonds participate in the formation of specific folding of peptides and ... [more ▼]

Disulfide bonds are post-translational modifications often found in biological compounds and especially in animal toxins. Disulfide bonds participate in the formation of specific folding of peptides and proteins, directly related to their biological activity. Cystein pairing determinations are primordial for the synthesis of chemical homologous displaying the same bioactivity than the natural compound. This task appears already difficult when the cysteine pairings have to be determined from large proteins. The combination of physical and chemical techniques such as NMR, enzymatic proteolysis, liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, is needed to circumvent this difficulty. However, when the work concerns small compounds such as conotoxins, the problem is much more complex due to the low amount of available compound and to the lack of enzymatic cleavage sites between cysteines. In this study, we investigate the case of small peptides that contain two disulphide bonds. The idea is to determine the cystein pairings in such compounds by a chemical partial reduction (or oxidation) of the peptides, followed by the separation of the generated species by ion-mobility mass spectrometry, and their characterisation by tandem mass spectrometry. Up to now, we have investigated the partial reduction not only in solution (with DTT and TCEP) but also in the gas-phase (Electron transfer dissociation), and partial oxidation in solution (with 3-CPBA). The results demonstrate an unexpected complexity of the data, including low fragmentation ratios of peptides and disulfide scramblings. [less ▲]

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See detailAttualità della critica : Persistenze novecentesche tra Francia e Italia
Curreri, Luciano ULg

in Ermeneutica Letteraria (2008), 4

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See detailAn Atypical Anion Transporter Functioning at Acid pH in Neuroblastoma Cells
Bettendorff, Lucien ULg; Margineanu, Ilca; Wins, Pierre et al

in Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications (1995), 207(1), 375-381

At pH 7.4, 36Cl- uptake by neuroblastoma cells was Na(+)-independent, saturable and blocked by submicromolar concentrations of DIDS. This suggests that at this pH, Cl- transport is mediated by an ... [more ▼]

At pH 7.4, 36Cl- uptake by neuroblastoma cells was Na(+)-independent, saturable and blocked by submicromolar concentrations of DIDS. This suggests that at this pH, Cl- transport is mediated by an exchanger analogous to erythroid band 3. At pH 6. [less ▲]

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See detailAn atypical cell during development of the auditory organ : the inner pillar cell
Thelen, Nicolas ULg; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg; Thiry, Marc ULg

Poster (2007, September)

Although the structure of the auditory organ in mature mammals, the organ of Corti, is clearly established, its development is far to be elucidated. Using cytochemical and immunohistochemical methods at ... [more ▼]

Although the structure of the auditory organ in mature mammals, the organ of Corti, is clearly established, its development is far to be elucidated. Using cytochemical and immunohistochemical methods at the light and electron microscope levels, we examined its spatiotemporal development in rats from embryonic day 16 (E16) to E19. <br />At E16, whatever the region of the cochlear studied (base, middle, apex), the organ of Corti is not present. We demonstrate that the organ of Corti develops from a non-proliferative cell zone that is located in the junctional region between the greater epithelial ridge and the lesser epithelial ridge of the cochlear duct and that is characterized by the presence of numerous microvilli. Using the periodic acid-thiocarbohydrazide-silver proteinate method, we reveal that the first cells to develop in this zone are the inner pillar cells, a particular type of nonsensory supporting cells; they arise in the base of the cochlear duct at the boundary between the two ridges at E16. The cell differentiation in this prosensory region continues according to a base-to-apex gradient, the inner hair cells appear in the greater epithelial ridge at E17 and the outer hair cells in the lesser epithelial ridge at E18. At E19, all the different cell types of the organ of Corti are well in place. We also show that the development of the inner pillar cells within the prosensory region does not involve Notch1 signaling. These results highlight the central role that cells could play the inner pillar in the organ of Corti development. [less ▲]

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See detailThe atypical emission-line star Hen 3-209
Nazé, Yaël ULg; Rauw, Grégor ULg; Hutsemekers, Damien ULg et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2006), 371(4), 1594-1600

We analyse observations, spanning 15 yr, dedicated to the extreme emission-line object Hen 3-209. Our photometric data indicate that the luminosity of the star undergoes marked variations with a peak-to ... [more ▼]

We analyse observations, spanning 15 yr, dedicated to the extreme emission-line object Hen 3-209. Our photometric data indicate that the luminosity of the star undergoes marked variations with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 0.65 mag. These variations are recurrent, with a period of 16.093 +/- 0.005 d. The spectrum of Hen 3-209 is peculiar with many different lines (H I, He I, Fe II,. showing P Cygni profiles. The line profiles are apparently changing in harmony with the photometry. The spectrum also contains [O III] lines that display a saddle profile topped by three peaks, with a maximum separation of about 600 km s(-1). Hen 3-209 is most likely an evolved luminous object suffering from mass ejection events and maybe belonging to a binary system. [less ▲]

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See detailAn atypical member of the light-harvesting complex stress-related protein family modulates diatom responses to light.
Bailleul, Benjamin; Rogato, Alessandra; de Martino, Alessandra et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2010), 107(42), 18214-9

Diatoms are prominent phytoplanktonic organisms that contribute around 40% of carbon assimilation in the oceans. They grow and perform optimally in variable environments, being able to cope with ... [more ▼]

Diatoms are prominent phytoplanktonic organisms that contribute around 40% of carbon assimilation in the oceans. They grow and perform optimally in variable environments, being able to cope with unpredictable changes in the amount and quality of light. The molecular mechanisms regulating diatom light responses are, however, still obscure. Using knockdown Phaeodactylum tricornutum transgenic lines, we reveal the key function of a member of the light-harvesting complex stress-related (LHCSR) protein family, denoted LHCX1, in modulation of excess light energy dissipation. In contrast to green algae, this gene is already maximally expressed in nonstressful light conditions and encodes a protein required for efficient light responses and growth. LHCX1 also influences natural variability in photoresponse, as evidenced in ecotypes isolated from different latitudes that display different LHCX1 protein levels. We conclude, therefore, that this gene plays a pivotal role in managing light responses in diatoms. [less ▲]

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See detailAtypical metabolisms and biochemical cycles imposing the cancerous state on plant cells
Gaspar, Thomas ULg; Bisbis, Badia; Kevers, Claire ULg et al

in Plant Growth Regulation (1998), 24(2), 135-144

The biological, morphological and biochemical characteristics which define plant cancer cells at the end of a neoplasic progression in the absence of pathogens and which distinguish them from tumorous ... [more ▼]

The biological, morphological and biochemical characteristics which define plant cancer cells at the end of a neoplasic progression in the absence of pathogens and which distinguish them from tumorous cells are summarized. Such plant cancer cells have in common with animal cancer cells many metabolic disturbances. The present paper reviews the biochemical changes in nitrogen, carbon, sugar and heme metabolisms which contribute to polyamine (PAs) accumulation. It indicates how these changes are interconnected and even form between each other biochemical cycles which likely maintain these cells in their irreversible state. The role of these cycles in the maintenance of such cells under a probable permanent oxidative stress is debated. [less ▲]

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See detailAtypical myopathy
Votion, Dominique ULg

in In Proceedings: 50th British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA) Congress (2011, September 08)

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See detailAtypical myopathy
Votion, Dominique ULg

in In proceedings: European Equine Health & Nutrition Congress (5th edition) (2011, April 16)

Atypical myopathy is a pasture-associated syndrome characterised by the sudden onset of acute rhabdomyolysis apart from any exercise. This frequently fatal acquired condition is intimately linked with the ... [more ▼]

Atypical myopathy is a pasture-associated syndrome characterised by the sudden onset of acute rhabdomyolysis apart from any exercise. This frequently fatal acquired condition is intimately linked with the environment. Atypical myopathy occurs primarily in autumn in Europe and Midwestern United States (Finno et al. 2006) (van Galen et al. 2011a) but outbreaks have also been reported in spring (Votion et al 2003; van Galen et al. 2011a). Atypical myopathy appears to be specific to horses and to the author’s knowledge no other grazing livestock has been confirmed for the disease. In recent years, atypical myopathy has been recognized as an emergent disease (Votion and Serteyn 2008; van Galen et al. 2010). Lately, major advances have been made in the understanding of the pathophysiology of the condition (Cassart et al. 2007; van der Kolk et al. 2010) and causative hypothesis (Unger-Torroledo et al. 2010). The metabolic defect occurring in atypical myopathy affected horses is a multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD), which affects mitochondrial fatty acid energy metabolism but not the use of carbohydrates for energy supply (van Galen et al. 2008; Westermann et al. 2008). The development of atypical myopathy is probably multifactorial but the condition has been associated with Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin (Unger-Torroledo et al. 2010). However, no specific treatment of the condition exists and the most effective way of controlling the disease is prevention that includes specific management practices at the horse and pasture levels. This review summarises the latest knowledge about atypical myopathy and provides practical information to prevent the disease. [less ▲]

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See detailAtypical myopathy
Gerber, Vinzent; Votion, Dominique ULg

in Robinson, E. (Ed.) Current Therapy in Equine Medicine, 6th edition (2009)

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See detailAtypical Myopathy (Atypical Myoglobinuria)
Votion, Dominique ULg; Amory, Hélène ULg; Demoulin, Vincent ULg et al

in IVIS Reviews in Veterinary Medicine (2004)

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See detailAtypical myopathy (myoglobinuria): 5 cases-based questions.
Votion, Dominique ULg; Serteyn, Didier ULg

Scientific conference (2008, April)

Case-based questions ... and answers!

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See detailAtypical myopathy in Europe: 2006-2009
Van Galen, Gaby ULg; Atypical Myopathy Alert Group; Votion, Dominique ULg

Poster (2010, June 18)

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See detailAtypical Myopathy In Grazing Horses: A First Exploratory Data Analysis
Votion, Dominique ULg; Linden, Annick ULg; Delguste, Catherine ULg et al

in Veterinary Journal (2009), 180(1),

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See detailAtypical myopathy: epidemiology and aetiopathogenesis
Votion, Dominique ULg

in In proceedings: 51th British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA) Congress (2013, September)

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See detailAtypical myopathy: new insights into the pathophysiology, prevention and management of the condition
Van Galen, Gaby ULg; Serteyn, Didier ULg; Amory, Hélène ULg et al

in Equine Veterinary Education (2008), 20(5), 234-238

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See detailAtypical plasma cells with coexpression of myeloid markers and bundles of Auer rod-like inclusions.
KEUTGENS, Aurore ULg; FOGUENNE, Jacques ULg; Gothot, André ULg et al

in International journal of laboratory hematology (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (12 ULg)