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See detailBehavior of omega-3 fatty acids in eggs during cooking
Douny, Caroline ULg; El Khoury, Rawad ULg; Degand et al

Poster (2009, July 01)

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See detailBehavioral and neurochemical effects induced by alcohol-conditioned stimuli
Quertemont, Etienne ULg; De Witte, Philippe

in Cahiers de l'I.R.E.B. (2000), 14

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See detailBehavioral and pharmacological differentiation of direct and indirect dopamine agonists and among dopamine uptake inhibitors
Witkin, J. M.; Tirelli, Ezio ULg; Geter-Douglass, B.

in National Institute on Drug Abuse Research Monograph Series (1995), 131

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See detailBehavioral Assessment in Patients with Disorders of Consciousness: Gold Standard or Fool’s Gold?
Schnakers, Caroline ULg; Giacino, Joseph; Rodriguez-Moreno et al

in Progress in Brain Research (2009), 177

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See detailBehavioral characterization of acetaldehyde in C57BL/6J mice: Anxiolytic, amnesic and hedonic effects
Tambour, Sophie ULg; Quertemont, Etienne ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg

in Behavioural Pharmacology (2003), 14(Suppl. 1), 68-69

It has been postulated that a number of central effects of ethanol are mediated through the action of its first metabolite, acetaldehyde. In particular, acetaldehyde might be involved in the anxiolytic ... [more ▼]

It has been postulated that a number of central effects of ethanol are mediated through the action of its first metabolite, acetaldehyde. In particular, acetaldehyde might be involved in the anxiolytic and hedonic effects of ethanol and is therefore believed to play an important role in alcohol abuse. In agreement with this assumption, previous studies indicated that acetaldehyde is mainly reinforcing in rats, which have been shown to readily self-administer acetaldehyde both peripherally and centrally. However, the hedonic effects of acetaldehyde have never been tested in mice, and the possible amnesic and anxiolytic effects of acetaldehyde remain to be elucidated. Therefore, the present studies were aimed at characterizing the anxiolytic, hedonic and amnesic effects of acetaldehyde after its acute peripheral administration to C57BL/6J mice. The effects of intraperitoneal acetaldehyde (0-300 mg/kg) injections were assessed in several classical behavioral tests. The anxiolytic effects were tested with the elevated plus maze, the hedonic effects with the place conditioning procedure and the amnesic effects with the passive avoidance apparatus. Our results show that acetaldehyde dose-dependently altered memory consolidation as evidenced by a reduced performance in the passive avoidance test when acetaldehyde was injected immediately after training at doses between 100 and 300 mg/kg. The elevated plus-maze showed that acetaldehyde, in contrast to ethanol, does not possess anxiolytic properties. Finally, the results of the place conditioning experiment confirmed that acetaldehyde displays significant hedonic properties. The present results add further support to the role of acetaldehyde in ethanol amnesic and hedonic effects but interestingly suggest that acetaldehyde is not involved in ethanol anxiolytic effects. [less ▲]

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See detailBehavioral characterization of acetaldehyde in C57BL/6J mice: Locomotor, hypnotic and ataxic effects
Quertemont, Etienne ULg; Tambour, Sophie ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg

in Behavioural Pharmacology (2003), 14(Suppl. 1), 69-69

Acetaldehyde, the first ethanol metabolite, was recently suggested to play a major role in many behavioral effects of ethanol. However, no studies have directly investigated the behavioral effects of ... [more ▼]

Acetaldehyde, the first ethanol metabolite, was recently suggested to play a major role in many behavioral effects of ethanol. However, no studies have directly investigated the behavioral effects of acetaldehyde after acute administration. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterize the locomotor, hypnotic and ataxic effects of acetaldehyde in C57BL/6J mice. Various acetaldehyde doses (0-300 mg/kg) were injected intraperitoneally and their effects were investigated with several classical behavioral tests. The locomotor effects of acetaldehyde were measured in standard activity boxes. In addition, the loss of righting reflex was used to assess the hypnotic effects of acetaldehyde. Finally, the ataxic effects of acetaldehyde were studied with the horizontal wire test. The results show that acetaldehyde induced a significant hypolocomotor effect at 170 mg/kg and higher doses. In addition, the hypnotic effects of acetaldehyde were evidenced by a loss of righting reflex in doses between 170 and 300 mg/kg. However, the locomotor and hypnotic effects of acetaldehyde were very brief relative to what is observed after ethanol administration. After 170 mg/kg acetaldehyde, normal activity was recovered in less than 30 minutes and the loss of righting reflex lasted only an average of 6.14 ± 1.29 minutes after the administration of 300 mg/kg acetaldehyde, the highest testable dose before lethality. Ataxic effects were observed with lower doses that did not significantly affect locomotor activity. These results show that acetaldehyde, like ethanol, possesses sedative, hypnotic and ataxic properties and therefore indicate that the first product of ethanol metabolism might be involved in these ethanol effects. [less ▲]

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See detailBehavioral characterization of acetaldehyde in C57BL/6J mice: locomotor, hypnotic, anxiolytic and amnesic effects
Quertemont, Etienne ULg; Tambour, Sophie ULg; Bernaerts, Pascale et al

in Psychopharmacology (2004), 177(1-2), 84-92

Rationale: Acetaldehyde, the first metabolite of ethanol, was recently suggested to contribute to many behavioral effects of ethanol, although few studies have directly investigated the behavioral effects ... [more ▼]

Rationale: Acetaldehyde, the first metabolite of ethanol, was recently suggested to contribute to many behavioral effects of ethanol, although few studies have directly investigated the behavioral effects of acetaldehyde itself. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to characterize the locomotor, hypnotic, anxiolytic-like and amnesic effects of acetaldehyde in C57BL/6J mice. Methods: Increasing doses of acetaldehyde (0 - 300 mg/kg) were injected intraperitoneally and their effects on a series of representative behaviors were investigated. The locomotor effects of acetaldehyde were measured in activity boxes. The duration of the loss of righting reflex was used as an index of the hypnotic effects of acetaldehyde. The anxiolytic-like effects of acetaldehyde were tested with an elevated plus-maze and the amnesic effects with the one-trial passive avoidance test. Finally, brain and blood acetaldehyde concentrations were assessed. Results: Acetaldehyde induced a significant hypolocomotor effect at 170 mg/kg and higher doses. In addition, the hypnotic effects of acetaldehyde were demonstrated by a loss of righting reflex after the administration of 170 and 300 mg/kg acetaldehyde. The elevated plus-maze showed that acetaldehyde does not possess anxiolytic-like properties. Finally, acetaldehyde ( 100 - 300 mg/kg) dose-dependently altered memory consolidation as shown by a reduced performance in the passive avoidance test. Conclusions: The present results show that acetaldehyde induces sedative, hypnotic and amnesic effects, whereas it is devoid of stimulant and anxiolytic-like properties in C57BL/6J mice. However, the behavioral effects of acetaldehyde after intraperitoneal administration were apparent at very high brain concentrations. The present results also indicate that acetaldehyde is unlikely to be involved in the anxiolytic properties of ethanol in mice. [less ▲]

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See detailBehavioral characterization of acetaldehyde in mice
Quertemont, Etienne ULg; Tambour, Sophie ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg

in Alcoholism, Clinical & Experimental Research (2004), 28(5), 196-196

Acetaldehyde, the first product of ethanol metabolism, has long been speculated to be involved in many of the behavioral effects of ethanol, although its precise role remains a matter of debate. However ... [more ▼]

Acetaldehyde, the first product of ethanol metabolism, has long been speculated to be involved in many of the behavioral effects of ethanol, although its precise role remains a matter of debate. However, most of the results supporting a role for acetaldehyde in ethanol’s effects come from studies in which ethanol metabolism was pharmacologically manipulated, whereas the behavioral properties of acetaldehyde itself are still largely unknown. In the present studies, we have characterized the locomotor, hypnotic, anxiolytic and amnesic effects of both ethanol and acetaldehyde in C57BL/6J and CD1 mice. Several classical behavioral tests were used: the open field, the loss of righting reflex, the plus-maze, the place conditioning and the passive avoidance. The results show that acetaldehyde similarly to ethanol induces sedation and hypnotic effects at high doses. In addition, acetaldehyde displays potent amnesic effects in the passive avoidance test, suggesting that the first metabolite of ethanol might be critically involved in the memory-impairing effects of ethanol. However, in contrast to ethanol, acetaldehyde does not show anxiolytic properties in the plus-maze. In a second part of the present studies, acetaldehyde contribution to ethanol’s behavioral effects was investigated by using several inhibitors of ethanol metabolism (3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, a catalase inhibitor, and disulfiram, an aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor). Overall, the present results suggest that acetaldehyde is involved in some of ethanol’s behavioral effects (amnesia, locomotor depression, sedation) but not in others (in particular anxiolysis). [less ▲]

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See detailBehavioral cross-sensitization between quinpirole and preweaning rats.
Tirelli, Ezio ULg; Schoonbroodt, Roland

in Society for Neuroscience Abstracts (1996), 22

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See detailBehavioral Demasculinization of Female Quail Is Induced by Estrogens: Studies with the New Aromatase Inhibitor, R76713
Balthazart, Jacques ULg; De Clerck, A.; Foidart, Agnès ULg

in Hormones & Behavior (1992), 26(2), 179-203

The injection before Day 12 of incubation of estradiol benzoate (EB) into Japanese quail eggs produces a complete behavioral demasculinization of adult males that will hatch from these eggs. These males ... [more ▼]

The injection before Day 12 of incubation of estradiol benzoate (EB) into Japanese quail eggs produces a complete behavioral demasculinization of adult males that will hatch from these eggs. These males never show copulatory behavior even after administration of high levels of exogenous testosterone (T). It is usually assumed that such a demasculinization normally takes place in female embryos under the influence of endogenous estrogens but few experimental data are available to confirm the validity of this model. A series of four experiments was performed during which R76713, a triazole derivative that specifically inhibits aromatase (estrogen synthetase) activity, was injected into quail eggs at different stages of incubation to prevent the production of endogenous estrogens. The consequences of these embryonic treatments on the T-activated sexual behavior in adults were then quantified. When injected before Day 12 of incubation, R76713 completely blocked the behavioral demasculinization of females without affecting the behavior of the males. After a treatment with T, almost all R76713-treated females showed as adults a masculine copulatory behavior that was undistinguishable from the behavior of intact males. This effect was fully reversed by the injection in egg of EB demonstrating that the effects of R76713 were specifically due to the suppression of endogenous estrogens. Injection of R76713 during the late phase of the incubation (Day 12 or Day 15) only maintained weak copulatory behavior in females which confirmed that the behavioral demasculinization in quail takes place mainly though not exclusively during the early stages of ontogeny. In a last experiment, we combined an early R76713 treatment with an injection of EB either on Day 9 or on Day 14 of incubation. This showed that the sensitivity to differentiating effects of estrogens varies with age in a sexually differentiated manner. The EB injection on Day 9 demasculinized both male and female embryos. If this injection was delayed until Day 14, it was no longer effective in males but still caused a partial demasculinization of females. This demonstrates that even if females are not yet behaviorally demasculinized on Day 9 of incubation (suppression of aromatase activity at that age will maintain the behavior), their sensitivity to estrogens is already different from that of males. [less ▲]

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See detailBehavioral Economics and Abuse of Dominance: A Proposed Alternative Reading of the Article 102 TFEU Case-Law
Petit, Nicolas ULg; Neyrinck, Norman ULg

in Global Competition Law Centre Working Papers Series (2010), (02/2010),

Behavioral economics has become a popular field of study. With the reconsideration of the homo economicus paradigm, psychology and sociology have infiltrated economic theory. More recently, several ... [more ▼]

Behavioral economics has become a popular field of study. With the reconsideration of the homo economicus paradigm, psychology and sociology have infiltrated economic theory. More recently, several commentators have argued in favor of an incorporation of behavioral economics within antitrust law. This paper argues, however, that EU competition law already integrates the findings of behavioral economics. A review of the Article 102 TFUE case-law reveals that contrary to the more conservative approach adopted by US agencies and courts, EU competition authorities already acknowledge the boundaries and biases of economic agents, and take into account the limits of the rationality assumption whilst drafting their decisions. [less ▲]

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See detailBehavioral effects of a prolonged treatment with small doses of morphine in cats
Djahanguiri, B.; Richelle, Marc ULg; Fontaine, Ovide ULg

in Psychopharmacologia (1966), 9

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See detailBehavioral effects of acetaldehyde in mice and rats: From reinforcement to amnesia
Quertemont, Etienne ULg; Didone, Vincent ULg; Closon, Catherine ULg

in Alcoholism, Clinical & Experimental Research (2008), 32(6), 289-289

Whereas human studies keep reporting evidence that acetaldehyde accumulation prevents alcohol drinking and alcoholism, animal studies support a rewarding rather than aversive role for acetaldehyde. In ... [more ▼]

Whereas human studies keep reporting evidence that acetaldehyde accumulation prevents alcohol drinking and alcoholism, animal studies support a rewarding rather than aversive role for acetaldehyde. In recent years, the reinforcing properties of acetaldehyde were demonstrated in various rodent strains and using different experimental methods. These results led to the hypothesis that acetaldehyde might be involved in the addictive properties of alcohol. In addition to its possible role in the reinforcing properties of alcohol, there is also evidence that acetaldehyde is involved in many other behavioral effects of ethanol. Using various behavioral procedures with both mice and rats, we have studied the behavioral effects of direct acetaldehyde injections. Additionally, in independent experiments we have compared the effects of ethanol in mice with or without a pre-treatment with the aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor cyanamide, which produces acetaldehyde accumulation. The results of these studies show that acetaldehyde produces a wide spectrum of behavioral effects, including reinforcement, aversion, sedation, ataxia and amnesia. These effects were mainly dependent upon acetaldehyde doses, with some of them showing an inverted U shape dose-response curve. These results also suggest that acetaldehyde might mediate or contribute to many of the behavioral effects of ethanol and especially to alcohol abuse and alcoholism. [less ▲]

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See detailThe behavioral effects of acute and chronic JL 13, a putative antipsychotic, in Cebus non-human primates
Casey, Daniel; Bruhwyler, Jacques; Delarge, Jacques et al

in Psychopharmacology (2001), 157

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See detailBehavioral effects of brain-derived estrogens in birds.
Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Taziaux, Mélanie ULg; Holloway, Kevin et al

in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (2009), 1163

In birds as in other vertebrates, estrogens produced in the brain by aromatization of testosterone have widespread effects on behavior. Research conducted with male Japanese quail demonstrates that ... [more ▼]

In birds as in other vertebrates, estrogens produced in the brain by aromatization of testosterone have widespread effects on behavior. Research conducted with male Japanese quail demonstrates that effects of brain estrogens on all aspects of sexual behavior, including appetitive and consummatory components as well as learned aspects, can be divided into two main classes based on their time course. First, estrogens via binding to estrogen receptors regulate the transcription of a variety of genes involved primarily in neurotransmission. These neurochemical effects ultimately result in the activation of male copulatory behavior after a latency of a few days. Correlatively, testosterone and its aromatized metabolites increase the transcription of the aromatase mRNA, resulting in an increased concentration and activity of the enzyme that actually precedes behavioral activation. Second, recent studies with quail demonstrate that brain aromatase activity can also be modulated within minutes by phosphorylation processes regulated by changes in intracellular calcium concentration, such as those associated with glutamatergic neurotransmission. The rapid upregulations or downregulations of brain estrogen concentration (presumably resulting from these changes in aromatase activity) affect, by nongenomic mechanisms with relatively short latencies (frequency increases or decreases respectively within 10-15 min), the expression of male sexual behavior in quail and also in rodents. Brain estrogens thus affect behavior on different time scales by genomic and nongenomic mechanisms similar to those of a hormone or a neurotransmitter. [less ▲]

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See detailBehavioral effects of rapid changes in aromatase activity in the central nervous system
Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Baillien, Michelle; Cornil, Charlotte ULg et al

in Kordon, C.; Gaillard, R. C.; Christen, Y. (Eds.) Research and perspectives in endocrine action (2004)

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See detailBehavioral Evaluation of Consciousness in Severe Brain Damage
Majerus, Steve ULg; Gill-Thwaites, Helen; Andrews, Keith et al

in Progress in Brain Research (2005), 150(Boundaries of Consciousness: Neurobiology and Neuropathology), 397-413

This paper reviews the current state of bedside behavioral assessment in brain-damaged patients with impaired consciousness (coma, vegetative state, minimally conscious state). As misdiagnosis in this ... [more ▼]

This paper reviews the current state of bedside behavioral assessment in brain-damaged patients with impaired consciousness (coma, vegetative state, minimally conscious state). As misdiagnosis in this field is unfortunately very frequent, we first discuss a number of fundamental principles of clinical evaluation that should guide the assessment of consciousness in brain-damaged patients in order to avoid confusion between vegetative state and minimally conscious state. The role of standardized behavioral assessment tools is particularly stressed. The second part of this paper reviews existing behavioral assessment techniques of consciousness, showing that there are actually a large number of these scales. After a discussion of the most widely used scale, the Glasgow Coma Scale, we present several new promising tools that show higher sensitivity and reliability for detecting subtle signs of recovery of consciousness in the post-acute setting. [less ▲]

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See detailBehavioral response of Harmonia axyridis towards their footprints according to their physiological state
Durieux, Delphine ULg; Fassotte, Bérénice ULg; Vanderplanck, Maryse et al

Poster (2012, August)

In order to survive cold, the multicolored Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), aggregates inside dwellings during winter. It has been recently highlighted that overwintering H. axyridis ... [more ▼]

In order to survive cold, the multicolored Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), aggregates inside dwellings during winter. It has been recently highlighted that overwintering H. axyridis individuals lay an area marking while walking, which is used by conspecifics to locate aggregation sites. These footprints are made-up of hydrocarbons, comprising both saturated and unsaturated homologues. However, it has not been demonstrated whether this “following area marking” behavior is specific to the overwintering individuals. The work presented herein was oriented to the study of the chemical evolution of these footprints according to the physiological state of H. axyridis. Monthly GC-MS analyses revealed that the area marking contained a greater amount of di-unsaturated compounds when laid by overwintering ladybeetles, suggesting the great importance of these chemicals in the ladybeetles aggregation process. In the second instance, behavioral investigations conducted in a Y-shaped glass tube were performed to assess (1) the evolution of H. axyridis behavior towards their footprints and (2) whether this behavioral modification is due to an evolution of the ladybeetles sensitivity or rather to an evolution of the area marking attractiveness. The results revealed that only the overwintering individuals follow their area marking, and that this behavior is linked to the ladybeetle physiological state rather than to the chemical profile of the marking biomolecules. [less ▲]

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See detailBehavioral sensitization and tolerance to the D-sub-2 agonist RU 24213 : dissociation between several patterns in mice
Tirelli, Ezio ULg; Jodogne, C.

in Pharmacology, Biochemistry & Behavior (1993), 44(3), 627-632

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)