Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBegian Surveillance Plans to Assess Changes in Salmonella Prevalence in Meat Production Stages.
Ghafir, Yasmine; China, Bernard; Korsak Koulagenko, Nicolas ULg et al

Article for general public (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (6 ULg)
See detailHet begin van de boekdrukkunst in België
Adam, Renaud ULg

E-print/Working paper (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDe behandeling van overbeet bij het paard
Verwilghen, Denis ULg; Vlaminck, Lieven

in Vlaams Diergeneeskundig Tijdschrift (2010), 79

Overbeet is de meest voorkomende congenitale tandafwijking bij het veulen. Minimale overbeten behoeven waarschijnlijk geen specifieke behandeling echter in erg aangetaste dieren kunnen zich secundaire ... [more ▼]

Overbeet is de meest voorkomende congenitale tandafwijking bij het veulen. Minimale overbeten behoeven waarschijnlijk geen specifieke behandeling echter in erg aangetaste dieren kunnen zich secundaire tandproblemen ontwikkelen. Erge overbeet kan gemakkelijk bij het onvolwassen dier door middel van een orthodontische behandeling worden aangepakt. Hiertoe wordt een beugel geplaatst die de groei van de maxilla remt. Bij volwassen dieren echter zal een erge overbeet enkel middels een dure en invasieve chirurgische ingreep gecorrigeerd kunnen worden. Dit artikel geeft een overzicht van de courante terminologie ter beschrijving van overbeet bij het paard en bespreekt achtereenvolgens de verschillende mogelijkheden tot correctie van deze afwijking bij onvolwassen en volwassen dieren. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 224 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBehavior in the open field predicts the number of KCl-induced cortical spreading depressions in rats.
Bogdanov, Volodymyr Borysovych; Bogdanova, Olena Viktorivna; Koulchitsky, Stanislav ULg et al

in Behavioural Brain Research (2013), 236(1), 90-3

Anxiety disorders are known to be comorbid with migraine, and cortical spreading depression (CSD) is the most likely cause of the migraine aura. To search for possible correlations between susceptibility ... [more ▼]

Anxiety disorders are known to be comorbid with migraine, and cortical spreading depression (CSD) is the most likely cause of the migraine aura. To search for possible correlations between susceptibility to CSD and anxiety we used the open field test in male Sprague-Dawley rats chronically treated with the preventive anti-migraine drugs valproate or riboflavin. Animals avoiding the central area of the open field chamber and those with less exploratory activity (i.e. rearing) were considered more anxious. After 4 weeks of treatment CSDs were elicited by application of 1M KCl over the occipital cortex and the number of CSDs occurring over a 2h period was compared to the previously assessed open field behavior. Higher anxiety-like behavior was significantly correlated with a higher frequency of KCl-induced CSDs. In saline-treated animals, fewer rearings were found in animals with more frequent CSDs (R=-1.00). The duration of ambulatory episodes in the open field center correlated negatively with number of CSDs in the valproate group (R=-0.83; p<0.005) and in riboflavin treated group (R=-0.69; p<0.05) as well as total time spent in the open field center in both groups (R=-0.75; p<0.05 and R=-0.58; p<0.1 respectively). These results suggest that anxiety symptoms are associated with susceptibility to CSD and might explain why it can be an aggravating factor in migraine with aura. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (5 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe behavior of asialotransferrin-iron in the rat.
Beguin, Yves ULg; Bergamaschi, G.; Huebers, H. A. et al

in American Journal of Hematology (1988), 29(4), 204-10

The effect of desialylation of rat and human transferrins on hepatocyte processing of the protein and its iron was studied in rats. No alteration in early transferrin catabolism was observed. Radioiron ... [more ▼]

The effect of desialylation of rat and human transferrins on hepatocyte processing of the protein and its iron was studied in rats. No alteration in early transferrin catabolism was observed. Radioiron disappearance from the plasma and liver iron uptake were more rapid for asialotransferrins than for normal transferrins (P less than .001). Furthermore, radioiron plasma clearance of human tri-sialotransferrin was faster (P less than .05) and liver uptake higher (P less than .002) than for human pentasialotransferrin. When the asialoglycoprotein receptor was blocked by the prior injection of asialofetuin, asialotransferrin behaved like normal transferrin. When the transferrin receptor was blocked by the prior injection of 50 mg human diferric transferrin, iron uptake from all transferrins was delayed to such an extent that uptake through both receptors seemed to be affected. Approximately 90% of the hepatic radioiron from all transferrins was chelated by desferrioxamine and excreted into the bile, indicating its uptake by the hepatocyte rather than the reticuloendothelial (RE) cell. The rate of iron release into the plasma and its subsequent accumulation in the red cell mass over a 2-week period was similar for human asialotransferrin, ferritin, and hemoglobin iron. This study 1) confirmed that asialotransferrin-iron uptake by the hepatocyte is mediated by both transferrin and asialoglycoprotein receptors; 2) demonstrated that not only asialotransferrin but also transferrin of low sialic acid content will increase iron turnover and lead to excessive iron loading of the hepatocyte; 3) and showed that the intrahepatocyte metabolism of asialotransferrin-iron did not differ from that of iron delivered by normal transferrin. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBehavior of bulk high-temperature superconductors of finite thickness subjected to crossed magnetic fields: Experiment and model
Vanderbemden, Philippe ULg; Hong, Z.; Coombs, T. A. et al

in Physical Review. B (2007), 75(17), 174515

Crossed-magnetic-field effects on bulk high-temperature superconductors have been studied both experimentally and numerically. The sample geometry investigated involves finite-size effects along both ... [more ▼]

Crossed-magnetic-field effects on bulk high-temperature superconductors have been studied both experimentally and numerically. The sample geometry investigated involves finite-size effects along both (crossed-)magnetic-field directions. The experiments were carried out on bulk melt-processed Y-Ba-Cu-O single domains that had been premagnetized with the applied field parallel to their shortest direction (i.e., the c axis) and then subjected to several cycles of the application of a transverse magnetic field parallel to the sample ab plane. The magnetic properties were measured using orthogonal pickup coils, a Hall probe placed against the sample surface, and magneto-optical imaging. We show that all principal features of the experimental data can be reproduced qualitatively using a two-dimensional finite-element numerical model based on an E-J power law and in which the current density flows perpendicularly to the plane within which the two components of magnetic field are varied. The results of this study suggest that the suppression of the magnetic moment under the action of a transverse field can be predicted successfully by ignoring the existence of flux-free configurations or flux-cutting effects. These investigations show that the observed decay in magnetization results from the intricate modification of current distribution within the sample cross section. The current amplitude is altered significantly only if a field-dependent critical current density Jc(B) is assumed. Our model is shown to be quite appropriate to describe the cross-flow effects in bulk superconductors. It is also shown that this model does not predict any saturation of the magnetic induction, even after a large number (~ 100) of transverse field cycles. These features are shown to be consistent with the experimental data. (C) The American Physical Society. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 80 (40 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBehavior of bulk melt-textured YBCO single domains subjected to crossed magnetic fields
Vanderbemden, Philippe ULg; Dorbolo, Stéphane ULg; Hari-Babu, N. et al

in IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity (2003), 13(2, Part 3), 3746-3749

We have experimentally investigated the crossed magnetic field effects on bulk melt-processed YBCO single domains. The samples were first permanently magnetized along their c-axis and then subjected to ... [more ▼]

We have experimentally investigated the crossed magnetic field effects on bulk melt-processed YBCO single domains. The samples were first permanently magnetized along their c-axis and then subjected to several cycles of a transverse magnetic field parallel to the ab planes. The magnetic properties along the c and ab directions were simultaneously measured using a couple of orthogonal pick-up coils as well as a Hall probe placed against the sample surface. The effects of both sweep amplitude and polarity were investigated. Field sweeps of alternate polarities are shown to affect the decay of the c-axis magnetization much more strongly than field sweeps of unique polarity do. However, the c-axis magnetization does not show any saturation even after a large number of field sweeps. Next, a micro-Hall probe scanning system was used to measure the distribution of magnetic induction over the top surface of the single domain subjected to the same combination of magnetic fields. The results are shown to be consistent with those determined with the sensing coils and bring out the role played by geometric effects. (C) 2003 IEEE. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (16 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBehavior of Deep Beams with Large Headed Bars
Mihaylov, Boyan ULg; Bentz, Evan; Collins, Michael

in ACI Structural Journal (2013), 110(6), 1013-1022

While anchor heads are particularly useful in the case of large bars which require significant development lengths, the ACI code provides design guidance for bars #11 or smaller. This paper presents a ... [more ▼]

While anchor heads are particularly useful in the case of large bars which require significant development lengths, the ACI code provides design guidance for bars #11 or smaller. This paper presents a test of a large deep beam reinforced with a single #18 headed bar. The behavior of the beam is evaluated in comparison to the behavior of a specimen with more conventional reinforcement of 6#8 headed bars, and to the behavior of a specimen with lap-spliced anchor hooks. Despite the extreme detailing of the specimen with a single #18 bar, the beam had the same strength as the specimen with 6#8 bars. The compressive stress in front of the anchor head reached about 1.5 times the compressive strength of the concrete and the stress in the #18 bar reached about 414 MPa (60 ksi) before the beam failed in shear along a diagonal crack away from the anchorage zone. Shear strength calculations according to Appendix A of the ACI code showed that the current strut-and-tie provisions can overestimate the shear strength of deep beams by as much as 23%. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 66 (15 ULg)
Full Text
See detailBehavior of Deep Reinforced Concrete Beams under Monotonic and Reversed Cyclic Load
Mihaylov, Boyan ULg

Doctoral thesis (2008)

Non-slender reinforced concrete beams find extensive application in cases where heavy loads need to be transferred over a given span. The safety of this kind of structural elements is often critical for ... [more ▼]

Non-slender reinforced concrete beams find extensive application in cases where heavy loads need to be transferred over a given span. The safety of this kind of structural elements is often critical for the safety of the structure as a whole. The research described in this thesis is devoted to studying the behaviour of lightly-reinforced non-slender beams under monotonic and reversed cyclic loads, as particular consideration is given to the load-bearing mechanisms which occur in moderately-deep beams. The choice of this topic was motivated in part by verification studies which show that the current code procedures for shear design of members without web reinforcement are least accurate in the range of transition from deep to slender beams. Furthermore, the issue of cyclic response of lightly-reinforced deep beams is of great importance for seismic assessment of existing structures, especially if the similarity between the load-bearing mechanisms in deep beams and those in other non-slender components such as coupling beams, squat shear walls, and frame joints is recognized. An experimental program consisting of ten tests of large non-slender reinforced concrete beams has been performed. All specimens failed in shear after transition from beam load-bearing mechanism to arch action (specimens without stirrups) or truss actions (specimens with stirrups). A suggested kinematic model was successfully used for interpretation of the various deformation measurements. The results showed that part of the ultimate shear was carried in the cracked concrete. It was concluded that load reversals had little effect on the overall response. A test of deep beam provided with single bar #18 demonstrated that anchorage by anchor heads is effective even when the biggest ASTM reinforcing bar is used. Comparison between experimentally-obtained and calculated shear strengths showed that the CSA code rendered reasonably conservative predictions compared to the mostly unconservative results of the ACI and EC2 codes. Theoretical work resulted in a derivation of an improved strut-and-tie model (ISTM) which is based on the CSA shear provisions but accounts for shear carried under the critical diagonal cracks of non-slender beams without web reinforcement. Verification against a large number of tests showed that the new model is consistent with physical observations and explains the transition from deep to slender beams. Furthermore, it was shown that the ISTM can be used in combination with the above-mentioned kinematic model for estimation of the ultimate displacement and deformed shape of non-slender beams. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 133 (26 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBehavior of heavy sections welded moment connections
Plumier, André ULg; Lequesne, Cédric ULg; Degée, Hervé ULg et al

in Proceedings of the STESSA 2009 Conference (2009)

Test results on moment connections of heavy sections are presented. Flange thickness are up to 32 mm in beams and up to 97 mm in columns. Different beam to column moment ratios, shear panel design, method ... [more ▼]

Test results on moment connections of heavy sections are presented. Flange thickness are up to 32 mm in beams and up to 97 mm in columns. Different beam to column moment ratios, shear panel design, method of connecting shear tab, welding methods and consumables are considered. Fracture of the welds, cracking of the shear tab weld, ductile tearing from weld access holes and buckling of the beam flange are ob-served. Practical conclusions are derived. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 71 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBehavior of interchromatin granules during the cell cycle.
Thiry, Marc ULg

in European Journal of Cell Biology (1995), 68(1), 14-24

We investigated at the ultrastructural level, by different cytochemical and immunocytological approaches, the behavior of interchromatin granules (IGs) during interphase and mitosis in two cell lines (HEp ... [more ▼]

We investigated at the ultrastructural level, by different cytochemical and immunocytological approaches, the behavior of interchromatin granules (IGs) during interphase and mitosis in two cell lines (HEp-2 and Ehrlich tumor cells). Identical results were found in all two cell types. In interphase cells, IGs group into irregular clusters of varying size. They are frequently associated with coiled bodies and homogeneous fibrillar bodies. Analysis of serial sections reveals that IG clusters occupy distinct regions within the nucleoplasm. During prophase, the aggregation of granules in these clusters gives rise to compact, spherical, granular structures. These disperse in the mitotic cytoplasm at the breakdown of the nuclear envelope. At early telophase, some of them come into close contact with the periphery of reforming nuclei. IG clusters reappear in the daughter nuclei only after the chromosomes have decondensed during late telophase. Concomitantly, the cytoplasmic granular structures disappear. During the cell cycle, IG are silver-stainable and EDTA-positive. They are also constantly labeled by the polyadenylate nucleotidyl transferase-immunogold technique for detecting RNA. These results support the view that IGs persist throughout the whole cell cycle. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBehavior of Large Deep Beams Subjected to Monotonic and Reversed Cyclic Shear
Mihaylov, Boyan ULg; Bentz, Evan; Collins, Michael

in ACI Structural Journal (2010), 107(6), 726-734

An experimental study on eight large reinforced concrete deep beams was performed. The variables were the shear-span-to-depth ratio (a/d = 1.55 or 2.29), quantity of stirrups (0.0 or 0.1%) and type of ... [more ▼]

An experimental study on eight large reinforced concrete deep beams was performed. The variables were the shear-span-to-depth ratio (a/d = 1.55 or 2.29), quantity of stirrups (0.0 or 0.1%) and type of loading (monotonic or fully reversed cyclic). All members failed in shear before yielding of the longitudinal reinforcement. The provision of only 0.1% of transverse reinforcement significantly decreased crack widths at service load levels and significantly increased the shear strength. For members with stirrups, the load-deformation response measured under monotonic loading provided an excellent envelope to the cyclic response and the shear strength under reversed cyclic loading was not significantly reduced. For the members without stirrups, somewhat surprisingly, those tested under reversed cyclic loading failed at significantly higher shear forces than their companion monotonically loaded specimens. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (12 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBehavior of omega-3 fatty acids in eggs during cooking
Douny, Caroline ULg; El Khoury, Rawad ULg; Degand et al

Poster (2009, July 01)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (10 ULg)
See detailBehavioral and neurochemical effects induced by alcohol-conditioned stimuli
Quertemont, Etienne ULg; De Witte, Philippe

in Cahiers de l'I.R.E.B. (2000), 14

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailBehavioral and pharmacological differentiation of direct and indirect dopamine agonists and among dopamine uptake inhibitors
Witkin, J. M.; Tirelli, Ezio ULg; Geter-Douglass, B.

in National Institute on Drug Abuse Research Monograph Series (1995), 131

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBehavioral Assessment in Patients with Disorders of Consciousness: Gold Standard or Fool’s Gold?
Schnakers, Caroline ULg; Giacino, Joseph; Rodriguez-Moreno et al

in Progress in Brain Research (2009), 177

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (6 ULg)
Full Text
See detailBehavioral characterization of acetaldehyde in C57BL/6J mice: Anxiolytic, amnesic and hedonic effects
Tambour, Sophie ULg; Quertemont, Etienne ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg

in Behavioural Pharmacology (2003), 14(Suppl. 1), 68-69

It has been postulated that a number of central effects of ethanol are mediated through the action of its first metabolite, acetaldehyde. In particular, acetaldehyde might be involved in the anxiolytic ... [more ▼]

It has been postulated that a number of central effects of ethanol are mediated through the action of its first metabolite, acetaldehyde. In particular, acetaldehyde might be involved in the anxiolytic and hedonic effects of ethanol and is therefore believed to play an important role in alcohol abuse. In agreement with this assumption, previous studies indicated that acetaldehyde is mainly reinforcing in rats, which have been shown to readily self-administer acetaldehyde both peripherally and centrally. However, the hedonic effects of acetaldehyde have never been tested in mice, and the possible amnesic and anxiolytic effects of acetaldehyde remain to be elucidated. Therefore, the present studies were aimed at characterizing the anxiolytic, hedonic and amnesic effects of acetaldehyde after its acute peripheral administration to C57BL/6J mice. The effects of intraperitoneal acetaldehyde (0-300 mg/kg) injections were assessed in several classical behavioral tests. The anxiolytic effects were tested with the elevated plus maze, the hedonic effects with the place conditioning procedure and the amnesic effects with the passive avoidance apparatus. Our results show that acetaldehyde dose-dependently altered memory consolidation as evidenced by a reduced performance in the passive avoidance test when acetaldehyde was injected immediately after training at doses between 100 and 300 mg/kg. The elevated plus-maze showed that acetaldehyde, in contrast to ethanol, does not possess anxiolytic properties. Finally, the results of the place conditioning experiment confirmed that acetaldehyde displays significant hedonic properties. The present results add further support to the role of acetaldehyde in ethanol amnesic and hedonic effects but interestingly suggest that acetaldehyde is not involved in ethanol anxiolytic effects. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (6 ULg)
Full Text
See detailBehavioral characterization of acetaldehyde in C57BL/6J mice: Locomotor, hypnotic and ataxic effects
Quertemont, Etienne ULg; Tambour, Sophie ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg

in Behavioural Pharmacology (2003), 14(Suppl. 1), 69-69

Acetaldehyde, the first ethanol metabolite, was recently suggested to play a major role in many behavioral effects of ethanol. However, no studies have directly investigated the behavioral effects of ... [more ▼]

Acetaldehyde, the first ethanol metabolite, was recently suggested to play a major role in many behavioral effects of ethanol. However, no studies have directly investigated the behavioral effects of acetaldehyde after acute administration. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterize the locomotor, hypnotic and ataxic effects of acetaldehyde in C57BL/6J mice. Various acetaldehyde doses (0-300 mg/kg) were injected intraperitoneally and their effects were investigated with several classical behavioral tests. The locomotor effects of acetaldehyde were measured in standard activity boxes. In addition, the loss of righting reflex was used to assess the hypnotic effects of acetaldehyde. Finally, the ataxic effects of acetaldehyde were studied with the horizontal wire test. The results show that acetaldehyde induced a significant hypolocomotor effect at 170 mg/kg and higher doses. In addition, the hypnotic effects of acetaldehyde were evidenced by a loss of righting reflex in doses between 170 and 300 mg/kg. However, the locomotor and hypnotic effects of acetaldehyde were very brief relative to what is observed after ethanol administration. After 170 mg/kg acetaldehyde, normal activity was recovered in less than 30 minutes and the loss of righting reflex lasted only an average of 6.14 ± 1.29 minutes after the administration of 300 mg/kg acetaldehyde, the highest testable dose before lethality. Ataxic effects were observed with lower doses that did not significantly affect locomotor activity. These results show that acetaldehyde, like ethanol, possesses sedative, hypnotic and ataxic properties and therefore indicate that the first product of ethanol metabolism might be involved in these ethanol effects. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBehavioral characterization of acetaldehyde in C57BL/6J mice: locomotor, hypnotic, anxiolytic and amnesic effects
Quertemont, Etienne ULg; Tambour, Sophie ULg; Bernaerts, Pascale et al

in Psychopharmacology (2004), 177(1-2), 84-92

Rationale: Acetaldehyde, the first metabolite of ethanol, was recently suggested to contribute to many behavioral effects of ethanol, although few studies have directly investigated the behavioral effects ... [more ▼]

Rationale: Acetaldehyde, the first metabolite of ethanol, was recently suggested to contribute to many behavioral effects of ethanol, although few studies have directly investigated the behavioral effects of acetaldehyde itself. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to characterize the locomotor, hypnotic, anxiolytic-like and amnesic effects of acetaldehyde in C57BL/6J mice. Methods: Increasing doses of acetaldehyde (0 - 300 mg/kg) were injected intraperitoneally and their effects on a series of representative behaviors were investigated. The locomotor effects of acetaldehyde were measured in activity boxes. The duration of the loss of righting reflex was used as an index of the hypnotic effects of acetaldehyde. The anxiolytic-like effects of acetaldehyde were tested with an elevated plus-maze and the amnesic effects with the one-trial passive avoidance test. Finally, brain and blood acetaldehyde concentrations were assessed. Results: Acetaldehyde induced a significant hypolocomotor effect at 170 mg/kg and higher doses. In addition, the hypnotic effects of acetaldehyde were demonstrated by a loss of righting reflex after the administration of 170 and 300 mg/kg acetaldehyde. The elevated plus-maze showed that acetaldehyde does not possess anxiolytic-like properties. Finally, acetaldehyde ( 100 - 300 mg/kg) dose-dependently altered memory consolidation as shown by a reduced performance in the passive avoidance test. Conclusions: The present results show that acetaldehyde induces sedative, hypnotic and amnesic effects, whereas it is devoid of stimulant and anxiolytic-like properties in C57BL/6J mice. However, the behavioral effects of acetaldehyde after intraperitoneal administration were apparent at very high brain concentrations. The present results also indicate that acetaldehyde is unlikely to be involved in the anxiolytic properties of ethanol in mice. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (7 ULg)
Full Text
See detailBehavioral characterization of acetaldehyde in mice
Quertemont, Etienne ULg; Tambour, Sophie ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg

in Alcoholism, Clinical & Experimental Research (2004), 28(5), 196-196

Acetaldehyde, the first product of ethanol metabolism, has long been speculated to be involved in many of the behavioral effects of ethanol, although its precise role remains a matter of debate. However ... [more ▼]

Acetaldehyde, the first product of ethanol metabolism, has long been speculated to be involved in many of the behavioral effects of ethanol, although its precise role remains a matter of debate. However, most of the results supporting a role for acetaldehyde in ethanol’s effects come from studies in which ethanol metabolism was pharmacologically manipulated, whereas the behavioral properties of acetaldehyde itself are still largely unknown. In the present studies, we have characterized the locomotor, hypnotic, anxiolytic and amnesic effects of both ethanol and acetaldehyde in C57BL/6J and CD1 mice. Several classical behavioral tests were used: the open field, the loss of righting reflex, the plus-maze, the place conditioning and the passive avoidance. The results show that acetaldehyde similarly to ethanol induces sedation and hypnotic effects at high doses. In addition, acetaldehyde displays potent amnesic effects in the passive avoidance test, suggesting that the first metabolite of ethanol might be critically involved in the memory-impairing effects of ethanol. However, in contrast to ethanol, acetaldehyde does not show anxiolytic properties in the plus-maze. In a second part of the present studies, acetaldehyde contribution to ethanol’s behavioral effects was investigated by using several inhibitors of ethanol metabolism (3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, a catalase inhibitor, and disulfiram, an aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor). Overall, the present results suggest that acetaldehyde is involved in some of ethanol’s behavioral effects (amnesia, locomotor depression, sedation) but not in others (in particular anxiolysis). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (4 ULg)