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See detailLa replantation du doigt.
Castermans, A; Lejeune, G; CARLIER, Alain ULg et al

in Bulletin et Mémoires de l'Académie Royale de Médecine de Belgique (1980), 135(6), 356-67

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See detailThe Replication in Vitro of the Gammaherpesvirus Bovine Herpesvirus 4 Is Restricted by Its DNA Synthesis Dependence on the S Phase of the Cell Cycle
Vanderplasschen, Alain ULg; Goltz, M.; Lyaku, J. et al

in Virology (1995), 213(2), 328-40

Because several observations have suggested that replication of the gammaherpesvirus bovine herpesvirus 4 (BHV-4) is influenced by the physiological state of the host cell, a study was carried out to ... [more ▼]

Because several observations have suggested that replication of the gammaherpesvirus bovine herpesvirus 4 (BHV-4) is influenced by the physiological state of the host cell, a study was carried out to determine the relationship between BHV-4 infection and the cell cycle. The temporal expression of BHV-4 late (L) proteins in unsynchronized cell cultures was first investigated by flow cytometry. Interestingly, L protein expression occurred in a limited number of cells infected with a high multiplicity of infection, and a reciprocal correlation between the percentage of positive cells and the cell density at the time of infection was demonstrated. Moreover, the finding that a BHV-4 early-late protein was expressed in nearly all the cells suggested that a blockage in the viral replication cycle occurred in some infected cells at the stage of viral DNA synthesis or L protein expression. Because this blockage could be the consequence of the dependence of one or both of these events on the cell cycle, they were investigated after infection of synchronized cell cultures. The following findings were made. (i) Cell transition through the S phase quantitatively increased the rate of BHV-4 DNA replication. (ii) BHV-4 DNA synthesis could not be detected in cells arrested in G0. (iii) Synchronization of MDBK cells with Lovastatin before infection increased the percentage of cells expressing L proteins. (iv) In contrast, infection of cells arrested in G0 led to few positive cells. Taken together these results showed that BHV-4 DNA replication and consequently the expression of L proteins are dependent on the S phase of the cell cycle. This dependence could be of importance for several biological properties of BHV-4 infection in vitro and might have implications for the biology of the virus in vivo. [less ▲]

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See detailReplication of large-scale epistasis studies: an example on ankylosing spondylitis
Bessonov, Kyrylo ULg; Van Steen, Kristel ULg

Poster (2013, September 17)

Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common form of inflammatory arthritis occurring in approximately 5 out of 1,000 adults of European descent. Recently, the Australo-Anglo-American Spondyloarthritis ... [more ▼]

Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common form of inflammatory arthritis occurring in approximately 5 out of 1,000 adults of European descent. Recently, the Australo-Anglo-American Spondyloarthritis Consortium and the WTCCC2 showed that polymorphisms of ERAP1 only affect AS risk in HLA-B27-positive individuals, hereby establishing an interaction between ERAP1 and HLA in the TASC, WTCCC2 and replication datasets [2,5]. We were able to confirm this interaction although using other SNPs. In this study, we use the aforementioned data from WTTCC2 on AS to address unresolved issues when performing large-scale SNP-SNP interaction studies, so as to better guarantee “stable” and “truly replicable” results. These issues are 1) the choice of variable selection method (e.g., of known loci mapping to genes part of know pathways), 2) the choice of SNPs representing a genomic region (e.g., SNPs with modest versus negligible LD between them), 3) the choice of analysis method (e.g., regression-based versus data-reduction (non-parametric) based), 4) different adjustment schemes for lower-order effects (using additive/co-dominant genetic models). We show that even modest changes in 1)-4) may give rise to quite varying epistasis findings for AS, and motivate some “optimal” choices via extensive simulation studies. In this work we rely on a minimal GWAI protocol for genome-wide epistasis detection using SNPs, as developed in our lab [6][9], using the advanced non-parametric Model-Based Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MB-MDR) method [1] and an adapted [*] BOolean Operation-based Screening and Testing (BOOST) algorithm [4]. [*] A BOOST [4] like implementation based on the original BOOST algorithm which accounts for missing genotypes [less ▲]

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See detailRéplication, clivage-encapsidation et recombinaison de l'ADN des herpèsvirus
Schynts, Frédéric; Meurens, François; Muylkens, Benoît ULg et al

in Virologie (2002), 6

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See detailReplication-associated strand asymmetries in mammalian genomes: Toward detection of replication origins
Touchon, M.; Nicolay, Samuel ULg; Audit, B. et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2005), 102(28), 9836-9841

In the course of evolution, mutations do not affect both strands of genomic DNA equally. This imbalance mainly results from asym- metric DNA mutation and repair processes associated with repli- cation and ... [more ▼]

In the course of evolution, mutations do not affect both strands of genomic DNA equally. This imbalance mainly results from asym- metric DNA mutation and repair processes associated with repli- cation and transcription. In prokaryotes, prevalence of G over C and T over A is frequently observed in the leading strand. The sign of the resulting TA and GC skews changes abruptly when crossing replication-origin and termination sites, producing characteristic step-like transitions. In mammals, transcription-coupled skews have been detected, but so far, no bias has been associated with replication. Here, analysis of intergenic and transcribed regions flanking experimentally identified human replication origins and the corresponding mouse and dog homologous regions demon- strates the existence of compositional strand asymmetries associ- ated with replication. Multiscale analysis of human genome skew profiles reveals numerous transitions that allow us to identify a set of 1,000 putative replication initiation zones. Around these puta- tive origins, the skew profile displays a characteristic jagged pattern also observed in mouse and dog genomes. We therefore propose that in mammalian cells, replication termination sites are randomly distributed between adjacent origins. Taken together, these analyses constitute a step toward genome-wide studies of replication mechanisms. [less ▲]

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See detailReplicative and cytopathic potential of HTLV-III/LAV with sor gene deletions.
Sodroski, J.; Goh, W. C.; Rosen, C. et al

in Science (1986), 231

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See detailReplicon typing of the F18 fimbriae encoding plasmids of enterotoxigenic and verotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains from porcine postweaning diarrhoea and oedema disease
Fekete, PZs; Gérardin, J.; Jacquemin, E. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2002), 85

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See detailReplicon typing of virulence plasmids of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolates from cattle
Mainil, Jacques ULg; Bex, F.; Dreze, P. et al

in Infection and Immunity (1992), 60

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See detailReply
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Magne, Julien ULg

in Journal of the American College of Cardiology (2012), 59(23), 2123

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See detailReply to "Comment on 'Detuning effects in the one-photon mazer' "
Bastin, Thierry ULg; Martin, John ULg

in Physical Review. A (2004), 70

We refute in this Reply the criticisms made by Abdel-Aty. We show that none of them are founded and we demonstrate very explicitly what is wrong with the arguments developed by this author.

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See detailReply to "Comments on Collignon et al. (Chem. Eng. Sci. 65 (2010) 5929-5941)"
Collignon, Marie-Laure ULg; Delafosse, Angélique ULg; Crine, Michel ULg et al

in Chemical Engineering Science (2011), 6

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See detailReply to Letter to the Editor
PITCHOT, William ULg; ANSSEAU, Marc ULg

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (2001)

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See detailReply to the discussion on the Report of Committee III.1 – ISSC’2003 "Ultimate Strength"
Rigo, Philippe ULg

in 15th Int. Ship and Offshore Structures Congress (2005)

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See detailReply to the discussion on the Report of Committee VI.2 – ISSC’2000 "Ultimate Strength of Ship Girder"
Rigo, Philippe ULg; Yao, T.

in ISSC’2000 VI.2 committee (2000)

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See detailReply to the Editor
SEGHAYE, Marie-Christine ULg

in Annals of Thoracic Surgery (2012), 94(5), 1787

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See detailReply to the responses on the comments on “Uncertainty profiles for the validation of analytical methods” by Saffaj and Ihssane
Rozet, Eric ULg; Ziemons, Eric ULg; Marini Djang'Eing'A, Roland ULg et al

in Talanta (2012), 100

Saffaj et al., recently proposed an uncertainty profile for evaluating the validity of analytical methods using the statistical methodology of γ-confidence β-content tolerance intervals. This profile ... [more ▼]

Saffaj et al., recently proposed an uncertainty profile for evaluating the validity of analytical methods using the statistical methodology of γ-confidence β-content tolerance intervals. This profile assesses the validity of the method by comparing the method measurement uncertainty to a pre defined acceptance limit stating the maximum uncertainty suitable for the method under study. In this letter we comment on the response (T. Saffaj, B. Ihssane, Talanta 94 (2012) 361-362) these authors have made to our previous letter (E. Rozet, E. Ziemons, R.D. Marini, B. Boulanger, Ph. Hubert, Talanta 88 (2012) 769–771). In particular, we demonstrate that β-expectation tolerance intervals are prediction intervals, we show that β-expectation tolerance intervals are highly usefull for assessing analytical methods validation and for estimating measurement uncertainty and finally we show what are the differences and implications for these two topics (validation and uncertainty) when using either the methodology of β-expectation tolerance intervals or the γ-confidence β-content tolerance tolerance interval one. [less ▲]

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