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Peer Reviewed
See detailRelaxed Assumptions for Iteration Methods
Brohé, Myrana; Tossings, Patricia ULg

in Nguyen, Van Hien; Strodiot, Jean-Jacques; Tossings, Patricia (Eds.) OPTIMIZATION (V.H. Nguyen - J.J. Strodiot - P. Tossings Editors), Proceedings BFG, Namur (1998)

We consider a general inexact interative method for finding a fixed point of a nonexpansive mapping on a real Hilbert space. Proofs of convergence of sequences generated by such a method generally require ... [more ▼]

We consider a general inexact interative method for finding a fixed point of a nonexpansive mapping on a real Hilbert space. Proofs of convergence of sequences generated by such a method generally require at least that the error term goes to zero. The aim of the present paper is to weaken this nonrealistic theoretical assumption. The obtained result is applied to the proximal point algorithm. [less ▲]

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See detailRelaxed skin tension lines imaging.
CAUCANAS, Marie ULg; PIERARD, Gérald ULg; FRANCHIMONT, Claudine ULg

in Treatment Strategies. Dermatology (2011)

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See detailRelaxMCD: smooth optimisation for the Minimum Covariance Determinant estimator
Schyns, Michael ULg; Haesbroeck, Gentiane ULg; Critchley, Frank

in Computational Statistics & Data Analysis (2010), 54(4), 843-857

The Minimum Covariance Determinant (MCD) estimator is a highly robust procedure for estimating the center and shape of a high dimensional data set. It consists of determining a subsample of h points out ... [more ▼]

The Minimum Covariance Determinant (MCD) estimator is a highly robust procedure for estimating the center and shape of a high dimensional data set. It consists of determining a subsample of h points out of n which minimizes the generalized variance. By definition, the computation of this estimator gives rise to a combinatorial optimization problem, for which several approximative algorithms have been developed. Some of these approximations are quite powerful, but they do not take advantage of any smoothness in the objective function. In this paper, focus is on the approach outlined in a general framework in Critchley et al. (2009) and which transforms any discrete and high dimensional combinatorial problem of this type into a continuous and low-dimensional one. The idea is to build on the general algorithm proposed by Critchley et al. (2009) in order to take into account the particular features of the MCD methodology. More specifically, both the adaptation of the algorithm to the specific MCD target function as well as the comparison of this “specialized” algorithm with the usual competitors for computing MCD are the main goals of this paper. The adaptation focuses on the design of “clever” starting points in order to systematically investigate the search domain. Accordingly, a new and surprisingly efficient procedure based on the well known k-means algorithm is constructed. The adapted algorithm, called RelaxMCD, is then compared by means of simulations and examples with FASTMCD and the Feasible Subset Algorithm, both benchmark algorithms for computing MCD. As a by-product, it is shown that RelaxMCD is a general technique encompassing the two others, yielding insight about their overall good performance. [less ▲]

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See detailRelB, a new Rel family transcription activator that can interact with p50-NF-kappa B.
Ryseck, R. P.; Bull, P.; Takamiya, M. et al

in Molecular & Cellular Biology (1992), 12(2), 674-84

We have identified a serum-inducible gene, relB, which encodes a protein of 558 amino acids containing a region with high similarity to c-Rel and other members of the Rel family. Transcriptional ... [more ▼]

We have identified a serum-inducible gene, relB, which encodes a protein of 558 amino acids containing a region with high similarity to c-Rel and other members of the Rel family. Transcriptional activation analysis of GAL4-RelB fusion proteins in yeast cells reveals that RelB contains in its C-terminal 180 amino acids a transcriptional activation domain. The N-terminal part including the region of similarity with the Rel family shows no detectable transcriptional activity. RelB does not bind with high affinity to NF-kappa B sites, but heterodimers between RelB and p50-NF-kappa B do bind to different NF-kappa B-binding sites with a similar affinity to that shown by p50-NF-kappa B homodimers. However, RelB/p50-NF-kappa B heterodimers, in contrast to p50-NF-kappa B homodimers, transactivate transcription of a promoter containing a kappa B-binding site. [less ▲]

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See detailRelease and innate detection of host cell DNA mediates the adjuvant effects of aluminum salts
Marichal, Thomas ULg; Ohata, Keichii; Mesnil, Claire et al

in Proceedings of te 4th International Conference on Crossroads between Innate and Adaptive Immunity (2011)

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See detailRelease and Innate detection of host cell DNA mediates the adjuvant effects of aluminum salts on adaptive responses
Marichal, Thomas ULg; Ohata, Keichii; Bedoret, Denis et al

in Proceedings of the 1St Winter School Immunology (2012, January)

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See detailRelease and innate detection of hot cell DNA mediates the adjuvant effects of aluminium salts on adaptive responses.
Marichal, Thomas ULg; Ohata, Keichii; Bedoret, Denis et al

Conference (2010, February)

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See detailRelease and innate immune detection of host cell DNA mediate the adjuvant activity of aluminum salts
Marichal, Thomas ULg; Ohata, K; Bedoret, D et al

Poster (2011)

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See detailRelease and innate immune detection of host cell DNA mediate the adjuvant activity of aluminum salts
Marichal, Thomas ULg; Ohata, K; Bedoret, Denis et al

Conference (2011)

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See detailRelease from inflamed tissue of a substance with properties similar to corticotropin-releasing factor.
Hargreaves, K. M.; Costello, A. H.; Joris, Jean ULg

in Neuroendocrinology (1989), 49(5), 476-82

In response to stressors involving tissue injury, pituitary corticotroph secretion of immunoreactive beta-endorphin (iB-END) could be either due to release of hypothalamic factors such as corticotropin ... [more ▼]

In response to stressors involving tissue injury, pituitary corticotroph secretion of immunoreactive beta-endorphin (iB-END) could be either due to release of hypothalamic factors such as corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) or to release of a tissue factor from the periphery. In the present experiments, we investigated whether inflamed tissue releases a factor which evokes pituitary secretion of iB-END. In an initial experiment, rats with an inflamed hindpaw due to carrageenan injection had significantly greater levels of circulating iB-END as compared to rats with saline-injected paws. Removal of afferent input, by hindlimb denervation, failed to block the carrageenan-induced increase in iB-END levels. Subcutaneous perfusates were then collected from inflamed and control hindlimbs and applied to rat anterior pituitary cell cultures. Pituitary release of iB-END due to administration of perfusate from inflamed paws was significantly greater than iB-END release due to perfusate from saline-injected paws or to basal release. The releasing activity in the perfusates was blocked in calcium-free medium and was not due to a direct action of carrageenan, bradykinin, substance P or calcitonin gene-related peptide. The results indicate that inflamed tissue releases a CRF-like factor which stimulates iB-END release both in the denervated rat and cultured pituitary cells. [less ▲]

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See detailRelease of 7-alkylguanines from haloethylnitrosourea-treated DNA by E. coli 3-methyladenine-DNA glycosylase II.
Carter, C. A.; Habraken, Yvette ULg; Ludlum, David

in Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications (1988), 155(3), 1261-5

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See detailRelease of 7-alkylguanines from N-(2-chloroethyl)-N'-cyclohexyl-N-nitrosourea-modified DNA by 3 methyladenine DNA glycosylase
Habraken, Yvette ULg; Carter, C.; Kirk, M. et al

in Cancer Research (1991), 51

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See detailRelease of cardiac biomarkers after an intense physical exercise: preliminary results
Le Goff, Caroline ULg; Laurent, Terry; Chapelle, Jean-Paul ULg et al

Poster (2010, March 20)

Background: Over the past 2 decades, there has been a large interest in cardiac markers elevations, which are often seen following endurance sport events. These elevations were transient, with levels ... [more ▼]

Background: Over the past 2 decades, there has been a large interest in cardiac markers elevations, which are often seen following endurance sport events. These elevations were transient, with levels decreasing to pre-event concentrations within 24-48 hours. This might be explained by the relatively short half-life of studied markers, or water imbalance during and after the event. Therefore, the present preliminary study aimed to examine the increase in N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), highly sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hsTnT) and I (TnI II), myoglobin, creatine kinase muscle – brain (CK-MB), myeloperoxydase (MPO) and Highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) elevations after prolonged strenuous exercise . Materials and methods: Blood samples (EDTA plasma and heparinised plasma) were drawn at baseline, after 45, 90, 105, 165, 225, 285, 345, 690 and 1440 minutes in two healthy persons (29 year, trained 6 hours per week; 23 year, untrained). Each subjects runs at the maximal possibility during 2 hours. Results: For the untrained person, level of NT-proBNP exceeded the upper reference limits 12 hours after exercise but increased in all times. HsTnT and TnI II levels were upper the reference limit respectively 45 minutes and directly after exercise and increased up to 4 hours after exercise. We reported a decrease of these concentrations above the reference limits after 24 hours. Myoglobin increased after 45 minutes until 5 hours after exercises. It decreased after the 5th hour to be normalized 24 hours after exercise. CK-MB increased directly after the exercise and was upper the reference limits 165 minutes after the exercise. Level of MPO was very high just after exercise and decreased quickly in the following hours to be just upper the limit references 24 hours after exercise. HsCRP levels increased after 105 minutes and continued to increase after 24 hours. For the trained subject, we noted the same profile of increase of cardiac markers levels stayed but in the range of reference. Conclusion: These cases are extremely interesting. Indeed, this observation suggested a physiological counter regulatory process rather a simple increase of myocardial damage related to the intensity of exercise. In fact, for this moment, we do not know if the release of cardiac markers is physiological or pathological thus it must be studied. This preliminary study on endurance training suggested that intensively is determinants of the rate and the magnitude of subsequent cardiac marker release. These results suggested that an adaptation mechanism could exist. Benefits and possible long-term negative aspects of prolonged exercise should be evaluated with a more important population of athletes. [less ▲]

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Peer Reviewed
See detailRelease of human neurophysin I during insulin-induced hypoglycemia is abolished after recovery with clomipramine treatment
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Langer, Gerhard; Koïnig, G. et al

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (1985), 10

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See detailRelease of immunoreactive oxytocin and neurophysin I by cultured luteinizing bovine granulosa cells
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg; Hagelstein, Marie-Thérèse ULg et al

in Acta Endocrinologica (1985), 110

We investigated the production of oxytocin (OT) and oxytocin-neurophysin (bNpI) by bovine granulosa cells cultured in presence of 10% foetal calf serum, a condition known to induce spontaneous ... [more ▼]

We investigated the production of oxytocin (OT) and oxytocin-neurophysin (bNpI) by bovine granulosa cells cultured in presence of 10% foetal calf serum, a condition known to induce spontaneous luteinization of these cells. The production of immunoreactive (ir) OT was significantly higher in the cultures harvested from large follicles than in those derived from small follicles. Chromatography on Sephadex G-25 showed similar elution sites of ovarian and synthetic OT, while HPLC revealed two peaks of irOT, one of which (±65%) coincided with synthetic OT. In another experiment, we could observe a gradual increase of OT, bNpI, and progesterone production by granulosa cells derived from large follicles, in relation with the incubation time. These data show that bovine granulosa cells are able to produce OT and bNpI, probably by an active biosynthesis as observed in the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system and that the granulosa productions of OT, bNpI and progesterone are closely related. [less ▲]

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See detailRelease of N2,3-ethanoguanine from haloethylnitrosourea-treated DNA by Escherichia coli 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II
Habraken, Yvette ULg; Carter, C.; Sekiguchi, M. et al

in Carcinogenesis (1991), 12(10), 1971-1973

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See detailRelease of the chloroethyl ethyl sulfide-modified DNA bases by bacterial 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase I and II
Habraken, Yvette ULg; Ludlum, David

in Carcinogenesis (1989), 10(3), 489-492

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See detailRelease of thromboxane B2 during adult respiratory distress syndrome and its inhibition by non steroidal anti-inflammatory substances in man
Deby, Ginette ULg; Radoux, L.; Haas, M. et al

in Archives Internationales de Pharmacodynamie et de Thérapie (1982), 259

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See detailUne relecture de la tombe de Nakht (Cheikh ‘Abd el-Gourna, TT 52)
Laboury, Dimitri ULg

in Tefnin, Roland (Ed.) La peinture égyptienne ancienne. Un monde de signes à préserver. Actes du Colloque international de Bruxelles, avril 1994 (1997)

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See detailThe relevance of a nonword repetition task to assess phonological short-term memory in individuals with Down syndrome
Comblain, Annick ULg

in Down's Syndrome, Research and Practice : The Journal of the Sarah Duffen Centre (1999), 6(2), 76-84

Phonological short-term memory capacity is generally measured with a word span task or a digit span task. Another way to measure it is to use a nonword repetition task. Gathercole and Adams (1993) claimed ... [more ▼]

Phonological short-term memory capacity is generally measured with a word span task or a digit span task. Another way to measure it is to use a nonword repetition task. Gathercole and Adams (1993) claimed that this procedure can be used with children as young as two-years old. It seems that in normally developing children the quality of nonword repetition is influenced both by the length of nonwords and by the degree of wordlikeness. Can the phonological short-term memory of individuals with Down syndrome be assessed with a nonword repetition task? In order to answer this question, we decided to replicate Gathercole and collaborators' experiments (1991,1993) but with individuals with Down syndrome. The quality of nonword repetition in individuals with Down syndrome is, as in normally developing children, influenced both by the length of nonwords and by their degree of wordlikeness. Furthermore, our results seem to confirm the hypothesis which states that nonwords are temporarily stored in the phonological short-term memory system. As this system has a limited capacity, both normally developing children and people with Down syndrome recall more short nonwords than long nonwords. In conclusion, nonword repetition is a reliable task with which to assess phonological short-term memory in individuals with Down syndrome as well as in normally developing children. [less ▲]

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