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See detailManaging children with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) Recommendations for the management of CML in children and young people up to the age of 18 years
de la Fuente, Josu; Baruchel, André; Biondi, Andrea et al

in British Journal of Haematology (2014), 167

Chronic myeloid leukaemia in children and young people is a relatively rare form of leukaemia that shows increased incidence with age and some evidence suggests that the molecular basis differs from that ... [more ▼]

Chronic myeloid leukaemia in children and young people is a relatively rare form of leukaemia that shows increased incidence with age and some evidence suggests that the molecular basis differs from that in adults. Significant advances in targeted therapy with the development and use in children of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and the ability to monitor and understand the prognostic significance of minimal residual disease by standardized molecular techniques has shifted the management of this condition from bone marrow transplantation as the main therapeutic modality to individualized treatment for each patient based on achieving specific milestones. The physiological changes occurring during childhood, particularly those affecting growth and development and the long-term use of treatment, pose specific challenges in this age group, which we are only beginning to understand. [less ▲]

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See detailManaging Chronic Kidney Disease in Older People--Reply
Glassock, rj; DELANAYE, Pierre ULiege; El-Nahas, M

in JAMA : Journal of the American Medical Association (2016), 315(3),

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See detailManaging climatic risks for enhanced food security : key information capabilities
Balaghi, Riad; Badjeck, M.-C.; Djaby, Bakary ULiege et al

in Procedia Environmental Sciences (2010), 1

Food security is expected to face increasing challenges from climatic risks that are more and more exacerbated by climate change, especially in the developing world. This document lists some of the main ... [more ▼]

Food security is expected to face increasing challenges from climatic risks that are more and more exacerbated by climate change, especially in the developing world. This document lists some of the main capabilities that have been recently developed, especially in the area of operational agroclimatology, for an efficient use of natural resources and a better management of climatic risks. Many countries, including the developing world, now benefit from well-trained staff in the use of climate data, physical and biological information and knowledge to reduce negative climate impacts. A significant volume of data and knowledge about climate–agriculture relationships is now available and used by students, scientists, technicians, agronomists, decision-makers and farmers alike, particularly in the areas of climate characterization, land suitability and agroecological zoning, seasonal climate forecasts, drought early warning systems and operational crop forecasting systems. Climate variability has been extensively modelled, capturing important features of the climate through applied statistical procedures, agroclimatic indices derived from raw climatic data and from remote sensing. Predictions of climate at seasonal to interannual timescales are helping decision-makers in the agricultural sector to deal more effectively with the effects of climate variability. Land suitability and agroclimatic zoning have been used in many countries for agricultural planning, thanks to the availability of new and comprehensive methodologies; developments in climate, soil and remote sensing data collection and analysis; and improved applications in geographic information systems (GIS). Drought early warning systems are available worldwide at both national and international levels. These systems are helping decisionmakers and farmers to take appropriate decisions to adapt to short-term climatic risks. Also, operational crop forecasting systems are now becoming available at the regional and national levels. In some developed countries, several efficient and well tested tools are now available for optimizing on-farm decisions based on the combination of crop simulation models and seasonal forecasts. However, in developing countries few tools have been developed to efficiently manage crops at the farm level to cope with climate variability and climate risks. Climate change impacts on agriculture and food security have been assessed in international studies using specific and efficient methodologies and tools. Adaptation to climate change and variability can also be facilitated through effective planning and implementation of strategies at the political level. The role of technological progress, risk transfer mechanisms and financial instruments and their easy accessibility to rural people are critical elements of climate risk management. [less ▲]

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See detailManaging competing water users in a small watershed using decision support tools - a case study of Burkina Faso
Wellens, Joost ULiege

Conference (2011, September)

The Kou watershed, situated in the Southwestern part of Burkina Faso, has succumbed since a couple of decades in a typical theater play of anarchistic water management. With his 1.800 km², this small ... [more ▼]

The Kou watershed, situated in the Southwestern part of Burkina Faso, has succumbed since a couple of decades in a typical theater play of anarchistic water management. With his 1.800 km², this small watershed holds the second largest city of Burkina Faso (Bobo-Dioulasso), a former State run irrigated rice scheme and several informal agricultural zones. Nevertheless the abundance on water through sources, an exploitable water table and a perennial water course, most water users find themselves regularly faced to water shortages due to an increase in population, low irrigation efficiencies and lack of mutual respect. Since 1987 the political and administrative authorities have been searching, together with the concerned users, ways to address the threats resulting from this situation through the creation of a Local Water Committee (LWC). Despite the Committee’s will, it was not before 2005 that the LWC started gaining importance through an impetus given by the State within the framework of a decentralised IWRM policy and the invitation of civil society (amongst others the privately run Water Observatory (WO)) to its activities. At the same moment these institutional and organisational changes took place; on demand of the above stated stakeholders (concerned users, public LWC and private WO) decision support tools have been appropriated to guarantee a decent monitoring of the water resources and their exploitation by agriculture. For small irrigated plots throughout the region, efficient irrigation calendars were being proposed using the FAO AquaCrop model. Another FAO tool, SIMIS, has been put in place for the management of an equitable water distribution for the watersheds irrigation scheme. A GIS, based on remote sensing data retrieval and on terrain gauging sites, has been developed for the monitoring of the available water resources and the expansion of the irrigated zones on a watershed level. The WO, aided by the University of Liege, focused on the development and the application of these tools and the appropriation of their derived results by the concerned users. Throughout the different study stages, participatory meetings were organised. Farmers and state agents were heard, and plans and solutions proposed and discussed. These results are periodically presented to the LWC, enabling them to forecast possible hot spots end granting it a judging base. Once decisions are taken, the administration in charge of water and agriculture surveys their application on the field. It is interesting to see how, once competing structures (public vs. private) reinvented their positions and now successfully collaborate, each having their terrain of expertise. The LWC gained in authority now that it finally has got objective data on the intensification of occupied lands and the use of the water resources. Several decisions have been taken and put in place to protect and conserve the water resources; other management scenarios are momentarily being developed and will be presented to the LWC the months to come. The administration in charge of water and agriculture, with its extended network of field agents, continued to play their role on terrain by guiding and popularizing, but as a public representative it’s also the only structure to enforce and maintain the ‘law and order’ of the retained land and water management policies. The private WO concentrated on counselling based on the results of the decision support tools. Being a free market player, it roamed the country to successfully find other parties interested in the developed techniques. After merely five years, improvements on the management of soil and water resources can be recorded thanks to the integration of decision support tools, the WOs counselling and the Ministries field agents. [less ▲]

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See detailManaging CSR in Complex Environments : Stakeholder Theory in Action
Xhauflair, Virginie ULiege; Zune, Marc

in Allouche, José (Ed.) Corporate Social Responsibility : Performances and Stakeholders (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (11 ULiège)
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See detailManaging Diversity: research into reconciliation of economic and social rationales
Cornet, Annie ULiege; Warland, P.; Constantinidis, Christina ULiege

Conference (2007, July)

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See detailManaging Diversity:paradoxes et dilemmes
Cornet, Annie ULiege; Moore, Lynda

Conference (2013, November)

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See detailManaging donor-related variability in cell production by means of data-based modelling
Mehrian, Mohammad ULiege

Scientific conference (2017, May 05)

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See detailManaging Family from Afar: Transnational Practices within Moroccan family networks
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege

Conference (2013, September)

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See detailManaging forest resources to secure wood energy supply for urban centers: the case of Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
Dubiez, Emilien; Vermeulen, Cédric ULiege; Peltier, Régis et al

in Nature et Faune (2012), 26(2), 52-56

The management of wood energy has become a major concern for the international community and is the focus of debates in Central Africa. The Makala Project, funded by the EU, fits within this context with ... [more ▼]

The management of wood energy has become a major concern for the international community and is the focus of debates in Central Africa. The Makala Project, funded by the EU, fits within this context with the objective of securing the supply of wood energy to urban centers. Over the past three years, various forest resources management techniques have been designed and an assessment of the wood energy sector has been conducted in Kinshasa. Various technical itineraries have been proposed for the management of areas dedicated to thesupply of wood energy at various levels, from the farming plot to the village land, and from the individual approach to the collective approach. This article provides a snapshot of the activities developed by the Makala Project to improve the management of periurban forest ecosystems and to secure the supply in wood energy. [less ▲]

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See detailManaging Hybridity: (Inter-)Organizational Strategies in the Fair Trade Field
Huybrechts, Benjamin ULiege

Conference (2011, July 07)

This paper aims to examine the concrete strategies through which organizations may reach compromises between conflicting logics. To reach this goal, this paper tries to capture some of the interactions ... [more ▼]

This paper aims to examine the concrete strategies through which organizations may reach compromises between conflicting logics. To reach this goal, this paper tries to capture some of the interactions between the organizational, inter-organizational and field levels in terms of management and diffusion of plural logics, using the case of social enterprises in the Fair Trade field. [less ▲]

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See detail‐ Managing Labour Immigration at the EU level
Gsir, Sonia ULiege

Scientific conference (2012)

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See detailManaging Migration for the Benefit of Europe
Martiniello, Marco ULiege

Scientific conference (2003, May 15)

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See detailManaging Pests : consumers and commitments: The case of apple and pear growers in Belgium's Lower Meuse Region
Collet, Eric; Mormont, Marc ULiege

in Environment & Planning A (2003), 35(3), 413-427

The authors analyse the construction of a seed fruit market. The conventional market had led to the 'anonymousness' of the fruit and to disconnected temporalities. The process needs new types of ... [more ▼]

The authors analyse the construction of a seed fruit market. The conventional market had led to the 'anonymousness' of the fruit and to disconnected temporalities. The process needs new types of coordination and components within the common information channels and actors' network. It also needs the construction of a new contract between producers and consumers, that the conventional market is unable to allow. Producers are experimenting with direct contact with the final consumer to find ways of allowing it. The fruit is replaced in the subject's experience of the final consumer and in the grower's story. The grower's story deals with managing pests, consumers, and commitments through a harmless action: eating a pear or an apple. [less ▲]

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See detailMANAGING PUBLIC ORDER DURING
Schoenaers, Frédéric ULiege; Vincent, Jeffrey; Easton, Marleen et al

Conference (2012, September)

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See detailManaging Research at the University
Grandjean, Geoffrey ULiege

Scientific conference (2011, September 28)

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See detailManaging Rhinophyma: an important lesson.
Takhar, Arun; Stephens, Joanna; POIRRIER, Anne-Lise ULiege et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailManaging the 'Overall Integrated Security Policy' at the local level: An Analysis of inter-institutional Dialogue
Croquet, Alice ULiege; Schoenaers, Frédéric ULiege

in Hondeghem, Annie; Rousseaux, Xavier; Schoenaers, Frédéric (Eds.) Modernization of the Criminal Justice Chain and the Judicial System. New Insights on Trust, Cooperation and Human Capital (2016)

Building on the heuristic principles of Sociology of Organised Action, this chapter aims to analyse the inter-institutional conception of Area Security Plans in Belgium. This collective decision takes the ... [more ▼]

Building on the heuristic principles of Sociology of Organised Action, this chapter aims to analyse the inter-institutional conception of Area Security Plans in Belgium. This collective decision takes the form of successive informal dialogue steps, culminating in ratification at the legal body originally instituted for the purpose of dialogue. Considering the concept of ‘apparent consensus’ and its conditions of implementation allows us to reveal the plural nature of collective decision-making when realised in practice. [less ▲]

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See detailManaging the carnivore comeback: assessing the adaptive capacity of the Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) to cohabit with humans in shared landscapes
Bouyer, Yaëlle ULiege

Doctoral thesis (2015)

Conflicts between humans and large carnivores are one of the most visible examples of the challenges that arise when seeking to achieve coexistence between humans and wildlife. With their large spatial ... [more ▼]

Conflicts between humans and large carnivores are one of the most visible examples of the challenges that arise when seeking to achieve coexistence between humans and wildlife. With their large spatial requirements and predatory behavior, large carnivores are among the most difficult species to preserve in our modern day landscapes. Although large carnivores are usually considered as the epitomes of wilderness, because of human population growth and habitat fragmentation they are inexorably and increasingly faced with the need to live in human-modified landscapes. As a direct consequence, conflicts over depredation on livestock, competition for game species and sometimes over human injury or death will only increase if clear management measures are not taken. This is particularly true in Europe, where, after many decades of absence, large carnivores are recolonizing areas where millions of people are present and where landscapes have been drastically modified. Two approaches to integrating wildlife into a human-dominated world have been proposed at an international scale. The first solution is called land sparing, in which wildlife lives exclusively in protected or wilderness areas where contact between animals and humans will be reduced to the minimum. The second solution, called land sharing, proposes to integrate human activities and wildlife in the same landscapes in non-protected interface zones in what is often called a coexistence approach. In a context of scarce true wilderness areas and a continuum of human-modified habitats, land sharing (i.e. the coexistence approach) is seen as the only possible approach valid for Europe. While a coexistence approach can be readily implemented with smaller species, it can represent a major challenge for species with large space requirements and with predatory behavior. To help manage these species in a long-term conservation vision and to predict where potential conflicts could arise between humans and carnivores, information on large carnivores and their habitat use in anthropogenic landscapes is a pre-requisite. With the return of Eurasian lynx Lynx lynx in Western Europe, the most densely populated areas of the continent_ information on the species tolerance to human land use will help predict where it is likely to occur in anthropogenic landscapes. Data collected in Scandinavia over 15 years were used to assess the use of landscape by lynx. In this study, we explored the effect of anthropogenic and environmental factors on Eurasian lynx habitat use in Scandinavia. The work was developed along two main axes. The first axis aims to explore large scale potential patterns of lynx distribution through transferability of results obtained from habitat modelling to geographically different areas. Transferability of results was tested in two steps. Firstly, transferability success (i.e. predictive ability of the map) was tested at a regional scale using data on roe-deer, the main prey of lynx, to create a map of relative distribution and abundance of prey in southeastern Norway (Chapter 1). Secondly, transferability success was assessed at a larger extent and using data obtained from different sampling method (Chapter 2). A habitat suitability map for Eurasian lynx was produced to be used in management planning in geographically differentiated lynx management zones in Scandinavia. The results indicated that transferability of results from one region to an ecologically different region must be taken with caution. Nevertheless, the habitat suitability maps we constructed on the basis of extrapolation are a valuable asset to help management of the Scandinavian lynx population. The second axis deals with lynx habitat use in relation to anthropogenic and environmental predictors. Lynx tolerance to human presence was first explored by looking at the orientation of home range in the landscape, taking into account proxies of human presence (Chapter 3). Values of these proxies were compared both inside home ranges and within a buffer surrounding the home ranges for several lynx inhabiting an anthropogenic gradient going from near-wilderness to urban periphery. Results showed a high diversity in the extent to which individual lynx are exposed to human influence, indicating that lynx are highly adaptable in terms of living space. Lynx seemed to be able to orientate their home range in order to avoid highest human impacts and select for areas of medium human impacts. Building on these results, finer scale information on lynx habitat use in an anthropogenic landscape were obtained taking into consideration different types of behavior (day-beds, moving and killing) displayed by adult lynx, as well as the effect of cumulative anthropogenic pressures on habitat selection (Chapter 4). Our results showed that lynx select for areas with medium levels of human modification, avoiding both the areas with highest and least modification. Females in general appear to be less tolerant to human modification than males, especially for day-beds. Our study shows that Eurasian lynx can be considered as a species that is adaptable to human- induced changes in landscape even if its motivation to tolerate human presence is clearly linked to the presence and density level of its main prey, the roe deer. Our work shows that, contrary to much of the public and many conservation professionals’ opinions, land sharing with large carnivores in Europe may be possible – even in the immediate proximity to urban centers. However, it is important to bear in mind that these results were obtained from countries with a relatively low human population density; even though some individuals observed lived in the periphery of large cities, the level of habitat fragmentation is less severe than in most of Western Europe. In order to properly assess the capacity of Eurasian lynx to live in highly populated areas, such as the Benelux, more detailed information on lynx distribution from continental European will be needed. However, our results underline the value of combining both correlational and mechanistic studies, and the need for caution in extrapolating data too far from its original context. As large carnivore recovery continues to progress in Europe we may not yet have seen the limits of these species' abilities to adapt. [less ▲]

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See detailManaging the osteoporotic patient today
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege

in BONE (2007), 40(5, Suppl. 1), 12-18

as reduced pain and disability. The unique mechanism of action of strontium ranelate corrects bone turnover so that it is rebalanced in favor of bone formation. Double-blind, placebo-controlled studies in ... [more ▼]

as reduced pain and disability. The unique mechanism of action of strontium ranelate corrects bone turnover so that it is rebalanced in favor of bone formation. Double-blind, placebo-controlled studies in postmenopausal osteoporosis show it to be effective in reducing vertebral and hip fracture risks. Treatment efficacy has been documented across a wide range of patient profiles and appears to be independent of all the major determinants of fracture risk, including the severity of the disease at baseline, the number of prevalent fractures, and the age of the patient. This antifracture efficacy translates into clinical benefits, including a reduction in the rate of height loss and an increase in the number of patients free of back pain. Strontium ranelate is also one of the few anti osteoporotic drugs with data to demonstrate an improvement in quality of life indices. The rates of compliance with treatment were over 80% in phase 3 studies, reflecting the tolerability and safety profile and the ease of administration of this agent. Strontium ranelate thus offers significant clinical benefits in terms of efficacy, tolerability, and ease of administration in the treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis fractures. (c) 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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