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See detailMolecular pathways involved in apoptotic cell death in the injured cochlea: Cues to novel therapeutic strategies
Lallemend, François; Lefèbvre, Philippe ULg; Hans, Grégory ULg et al

in Current Pharmaceutical Design (2005), 11(17), 2257-2275

Most hearing loss results from lesions of the sensory cells and/or neurons of the auditory portion of the inner ear. To date, only the cochlear implantation offers long-term hearing-aid benefit, but still ... [more ▼]

Most hearing loss results from lesions of the sensory cells and/or neurons of the auditory portion of the inner ear. To date, only the cochlear implantation offers long-term hearing-aid benefit, but still with limited performance and expensive cost. While the underlying causes of deafness are not clear, the death or hair cells and/or neurons and the loss of neuronal contacts are key pathological features. Pinpointing molecular events that control cell death in the cochlea is critical for the development of new strategies to prevent and treat deafness, whether in combination or not with cochlear implant therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular pathways of angiogenesis inhibition.
Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg; Griffioen, Arjan W

in Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications (2007), 355(1), 1-5

A large body of evidence now demonstrates that angiostatic therapy represents a promising way to fight cancer. This research recently resulted in the approval of the first angiostatic agent for clinical ... [more ▼]

A large body of evidence now demonstrates that angiostatic therapy represents a promising way to fight cancer. This research recently resulted in the approval of the first angiostatic agent for clinical treatment of cancer. Progress has been achieved in decrypting the cellular signaling in endothelial cells induced by angiostatic agents. These agents predominantly interfere with the molecular pathways involved in migration, proliferation and endothelial cell survival. In the current review, these pathways are discussed. A thorough understanding of the mechanism of action of angiostatic agents is required to develop efficient anti-tumor therapies. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular pathways supporting the proliferation staging of malignant melanoma (review).
Quatresooz, Pascale ULg; Pierard, Gérald ULg; Franchimont, Claudine ULg et al

in International Journal of Molecular Medicine (2009), 24(3), 295-301

The clinical diagnosis of cutaneous melanoma always calls for histological confirmation. In addition to the recognition of the classic aspects of the neoplasm, immunohistochemistry is determinant, in ... [more ▼]

The clinical diagnosis of cutaneous melanoma always calls for histological confirmation. In addition to the recognition of the classic aspects of the neoplasm, immunohistochemistry is determinant, in particular in the assessment of the size of the replicative compartment. Generally, the proliferation rate is indicative of the neoplastic progression and is related to the clinical growth rate of the neoplasm. It allows to distinguish high risk melanomas showing a high growth rate from those of lower malignancy associated with a restricted growth rate. In melanoma, the recruitment and progression of neoplastic cells in the cell cycle of proliferation have lost some of their controls that are normally processed by a series of key regulatory molecules. In addition, the apoptotic pathway counteracting any hyperproliferative activity is released of the dependency of specific regulated molecular mechanisms. This review summarizes the current knowledge on key molecular components involved in the deregulation of the growth fraction, cell proliferation and apoptosis in melanocytic neoplasms. The implication of cyclins and of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways are scrutinized. The involvement of neoplastic stem cells in the metastatic process is also discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular patterns of rhizobacteria involved in plant immunity elicitation.
Mariutto, Martin ULg; Ongena, Marc ULg

in Advances in Botanical Research (2015), 75

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See detailMolecular phylogeny and evolutionary history of Dipodoidea (Rodentia, Mammalia)
Pisano, Julie ULg; Pagès, Marie; Condamine, Fabien et al

Conference (2012, July)

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See detailMolecular phylogeny and systematics of Dipodoidea: a test of morphology-based hypotheses
Lebedev, Vladimir; Bannikova, Anna; Pagès, Marie ULg et al

in Zoologica Scripta (2013), (3),

The superfamily Dipodoidea (Rodentia, Myomorpha) in its current interpretation contains a single family subdivided into six subfamilies. Four of them include morphologically specialized bipedal arid ... [more ▼]

The superfamily Dipodoidea (Rodentia, Myomorpha) in its current interpretation contains a single family subdivided into six subfamilies. Four of them include morphologically specialized bipedal arid-dwelling jerboas (Dipodinae – three-toed jerboas, Allactaginae – fivetoed jerboas, Cardiocraniinae – pygmy jerboas and Euchoreutinae – long-eared jerboas), the other two are represented by more generalized quadrupedal taxa (Zapodinae – jumping mice and Sminthinae – birch mice). Despite considerable effort from morphologists, the taxonomy as well as the phylogeny of the Dipodoidea remains controversial. Strikingly, molecular approach has never been envisaged to investigate these questions. In this study, the phylogenetic relationships among the main dipodoid lineages were reconstructed for the first time using DNA sequence data from four nuclear genes (IRBP, GHR, BRCA1, RAG1). No evidence of conflict among genes was revealed. The same robustly supported tree topology was inferred from the concatenated alignment whatever the phylogenetic methods used (maximum parsimony, maximum-likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic methods). Sminthinae branches basally within the dipodoids followed by Zapodinae. Monophyletic Cardiocraniinae is sister to all other jerboas. Within the latter, the monophyly of both Dipodinae and Allactaginae is highly supported. The relationships between Dipodinae, Allactaginae and Euchoreutinae should be regarded as unresolved trichotomy. Morphological hypotheses were confronted to findings based on the presented molecular data. As a result, previously proposed sister group relationships between Euchoreutes and Sicista, Paradipus and Cardiocraniinae as well as the monophyly of Cardiocaniinae + Dipodinae were rejected. However, the latter association is consistently supported by most morphological analyses. The basis of the obvious conflict between genes and morphology remains unclear. Suggested modifications to the taxonomy of Dipodoidea imply recognition of three families: Sminthidae, Zapodidae and Dipodidae, the latter including Cardiocraniinae, Euchoreutinae, Allactaginae and Dipodinae as subfamilies. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular phylogeny in the genus Phaseolus.
Fofana, B.; Du Jardin, Patrick ULg; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre ULg

in European conference on grain legumes proceedings (1998)

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See detailMolecular phylogeny of South-East Asian arboreal murine rodents
Pages, Marie; Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Chaval, Yannick et al

in Zoologica Scripta (2015)

Recent phylogenetic studies and taxonomic reviews have led to nearly complete resolution of the phylogenetic divisions within the old world rats and mice (Muridae, Murinae). The Micromys division and ... [more ▼]

Recent phylogenetic studies and taxonomic reviews have led to nearly complete resolution of the phylogenetic divisions within the old world rats and mice (Muridae, Murinae). The Micromys division and Pithecheir division are two notable exceptions where groupings of species into these divisions based on morphology and arboreal lifestyle have not been supported by phylogenetic evidence. Several enigmatic species from these divisions have been missing from molecular studies, preventing a rigorous revision of phylogenetic relationships. In this study, we sequenced for the first time one mitochondrial and three nuclear genes from South-East Asian keystone species of these two arboreal divisions: Hapalomys delacouri (Micromys division), Lenothrix canus and Pithecheir parvus (Pithecheir division). We also complemented the molecular data already available for the two divisions with new data from Sundaic Chiropodomys, Indian Vandeleuria oleracea and the recently described Sulawesian Margaretamys christinae. Using this new phylogenetic framework and molecular dating methodologies, our study allows some more detailed classification of the former Micromys and Pithecheir divisions, while confirming their polyphyletic status. Specifically, the former Micromys division should now be split into four monotypic divisions: Chiropodomys, Hapalomys, Micromys and Vandeleuria divisions. The former Pithecheir division is likely to be refined and restricted to Pithecheir and probably Pithecheirops, whereas Lenothrix and Margaretamys should now be recognized as representatives of the Dacnomys division. Our findings have profound implications with regard to the systematics of Murinae, as well as to the early evolution of murine morphology and dental characters. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular phylogeny of symbiotic pearlfishes
Lanterbcq, D; Parmentier, Eric ULg; Todesco, Maïté et al

Poster (2009)

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See detailMolecular phylogeny of the Cricetinae subfamily based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b and 12S rRNA genes and the nuclear vWF gene
Neumann, K.; Michaux, Johan ULg; Lebedev, V. et al

in Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution (2006), 39(1), 135-148

Despite some popularity of hamsters as pets and laboratory animals there is no reliable phylogeny of the subfamily Cricetinae available so far. Contradicting views exist not only about the actual number ... [more ▼]

Despite some popularity of hamsters as pets and laboratory animals there is no reliable phylogeny of the subfamily Cricetinae available so far. Contradicting views exist not only about the actual number of species but also concerning the validity of several genera. We used partial DNA sequences of two mitochondrial (cytochrome b, 12S rRNA) and one partial nuclear gene (von Willebrand Factor exon 28) to provide a first gene tree of the Cricetinae based on 15 taxa comprising six genera: According to our data, Palaearctic hamsters fall into three distinct phylogenetic groups: Phodopits, Mesocricetus, and Cricetus-related species which evolved during the late Miocene about 7-12 MY ago. Surprisingly, the genus Phodopus, which was previously thought to have appeared during the Pleistocene, forms the oldest clade. The largest number of extant hamster genera is found in a group of Cricetus-related hamsters. The genus Cricetulus itself proved to be not truly monophyletic with Cricetulus migratorius appearing more closely related to Tscherskia, Cricetus, and Allocricetulus. We propose to place the species within a new monotypic genus. Molecular clock calculations are not always in line with the dating of fossil records. DNA based divergence time estimates as well as taxonomic relationships demand a reevaluation of morphological characters previously used to identify fossils and extant hamsters. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular phylogeographt of the common dormouse
mouton, alice; Grill, andrea; Sara, Maurizio et al

in Abstract book of the 13th Rodens & Spatium conference (2013)

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See detailMolecular phylogeography of the common dormouse, Muscardinus avellanarius
Mouton, Alice ULg; Grill, Andrea; Sarà, Maurizio et al

Conference (2011)

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See detailMolecular phylogeography of the common dormouse, Muscardinus avellanarius, in Europe
Mouton, Alice ULg; Grill, Andrea; Krystufek, Boris et al

Conference (2009, September)

The common dormouse, Muscardinus avellanarius is naturally rare in Europe. Recently, natural scarcity has been exacerbated by anthropogenic environmental damages. This specie is now regarded as rare or ... [more ▼]

The common dormouse, Muscardinus avellanarius is naturally rare in Europe. Recently, natural scarcity has been exacerbated by anthropogenic environmental damages. This specie is now regarded as rare or endangered, attracting conservation related research and active habitat management to assist its survival. Furthermore, obligatory thermophilous species are probably more affected by cold phases than cold-tolerant organisms. The evolutionary history of the common dormouse would therefore show significant differences compared to other species. To better understand the genetic variation and structure of this species, we developed a phylogeographic study based on sequences of 700 base pairs of the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b gene from 102 specimens collected throughout its palearctic distribution. The obtained dataset was analysed using different phylogenetic reconstruction as well as other methods adapted to phylogeography. The analysis of the mtDNA reveals a number of surprises. The results show two major genetic lineages: the first corresponding to the Western and Italian populations; the second comprising the Balkan and the Northern populations. Furthermore, the analyses tend to propose a scenario of multiple refugia in the Italian peninsula. This pattern of ‘refugia within-refugia’ has important implications in interpreting the distribution patterns of genetic diversity within the southern peninsulas. The Calabria region and Sicily could be “hot spots” of intraspecific biodiversity of Muscardinus avellanarius. These regions would thus deserve attention when deciding Evolutionary Significant Units (“ESU) for conservation of this species. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular phylogeography of the common dormouse, Muscardinus avellanarius.
Mouton, Alice ULg; Grill, Andrea; Sarà, Maurizio et al

Conference (2012)

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See detailMolecular Polymorphisms in Tunisian Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) as Revealed by RAPD Fingerprints
Hasnaoui, Nejib ULg; Mars, Messaoud; Chibani, Jemni et al

in Diversity (2010), 2(1), 107-114

The genetic diversity among Tunisian pomegranate cultivars has been investigated. Using universal primers, the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method was used to generate banding profiles from a ... [more ▼]

The genetic diversity among Tunisian pomegranate cultivars has been investigated. Using universal primers, the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method was used to generate banding profiles from a set of twelve cultivars. Data was then computed with appropriate programs to construct a dendrogram illustrating the relationships between the studied cultivars. Our data proved the efficiency of the designed method to examine the DNA polymorphism in this crop since the tested primers are characterized by a collective resolving power of 12.83. In addition, the cluster analysis has exhibited a parsimonious tree branching independent from the geographic origin of the cultivars. In spite of the relatively low number of primers and cultivars, RAPD constitutes an appropriate procedure to assess the genetic diversity and to survey the phylogenetic relationships in this crop. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular profiling of 16K PRL treated tumours by an antibody-array approach
Cornet, Anne ULg; Nguyen, Ngoc-Quynh-Nhu ULg; Lion, Michelle ULg et al

Poster (2006, May)

Tumour development is often accompanied by the formation of new blood vessels from existing vasculature. This new intratumoral blood network is driven by the process of angiogenesis, providing the ... [more ▼]

Tumour development is often accompanied by the formation of new blood vessels from existing vasculature. This new intratumoral blood network is driven by the process of angiogenesis, providing the essential nutrients for growth, invasion and metastasis. At the present time, it is well established that inhibitors of angiogenesis prevent the growth and progression of tumours, offering a new therapeutic approach for treatment of cancer. Several studies have already showed that the N-terminal fragment of the human prolactin, 16k-Da PRL, has a potent anti-angiogenic activity. Recently, research groups have demonstrated that the 16k-Da PRL inhibits tumour development in animal models. Despite the fact that several studies leading to improve our knowledge of 16k-Da PRL action were performed, little is known about its role played to prevent tumour growth in vivo. In this study, we first tested the ability of the 16k-Da PRL to inhibit the growth of established HCT116 tumours in nude mice, using an adenovirus approach. As expected, we found that the tumour progression was tightly reduced by the expression of the 16k-Da PRL into the tumours. This antitumour activity was also associated with a slight tumour vascularization. To discover biomarkers that contribute in 16k-Da PRL tumour suppressive effects, we used one of the most powerful multiplexed detection techonologies: the antibody-microarray proposed by Eurogentec. These protein-chips allow to identify multiple proteins from small amounts of samples within a single experiment. Three independent sets of antibody array from samples of 16k-Da PRL treated tumours and controls were analysed. Experimental and analysis optimisations were applied to ensure the correct interpretation of the fluorescent signals from the antibody arrays. In addition, significant results were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Our study allowed to identify several proteins which could be implicated in the tumour dormancy induced by 16k-Da PRL treatment. Additional analysis will provide important biological information for discovering of the new cancer biomarkers and their relationship with the 16k-Da PRL effects on cancer development. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular properties of cinchona alkaloids: a theoretical approach
Oleksyn, Barbara; Suszko-Purzycka, Alina; Dive, Georges ULg et al

in Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences (1992), 81(2), 122-127

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See detailMolecular Reclassification of Crohn’s Disease by cluster analysis of genetic variants
Cleynen, I.; Mahachie John, Jestinah ULg; Henkaerts, L. et al

in Gut (2009)

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See detailMolecular Reclassification of Crohn's Disease by Cluster Analysis of Genetic Variants
Cleynen, Isabelle; Mahachie John, Jestinah ULg; Henckaerts, Liesbet et al

in PLoS ONE (2010), 5(9), 12952

<sec> <title>Background</title> <p>Crohn's Disease (CD) has a heterogeneous presentation, and is typically classified according to extent and location of disease. The genetic susceptibility to CD is well ... [more ▼]

<sec> <title>Background</title> <p>Crohn's Disease (CD) has a heterogeneous presentation, and is typically classified according to extent and location of disease. The genetic susceptibility to CD is well known and genome-wide association scans (GWAS) and meta-analysis thereof have identified over 30 susceptibility loci. Except for the association between ileal CD and <italic>NOD2</italic> mutations, efforts in trying to link CD genetics to clinical subphenotypes have not been very successful. We hypothesized that the large number of confirmed genetic variants enables (better) classification of CD patients.</p> </sec><sec> <title>Methodology/Principal Findings</title> <p>To look for genetic-based subgroups, genotyping results of 46 SNPs identified from CD GWAS were analyzed by Latent Class Analysis (LCA) in CD patients and in healthy controls. Six genetic-based subgroups were identified in CD patients, which were significantly different from the five subgroups found in healthy controls. The identified CD-specific clusters are therefore likely to contribute to disease behavior. We then looked at whether we could relate the genetic-based subgroups to the currently used clinical parameters. Although modest differences in prevalence of disease location and behavior could be observed among the CD clusters, Random Forest analysis showed that patients could not be allocated to one of the 6 genetic-based subgroups based on the typically used clinical parameters alone. This points to a poor relationship between the genetic-based subgroups and the used clinical subphenotypes.</p> </sec><sec> <title>Conclusions/Significance</title> <p>This approach serves as a first step to reclassify Crohn's disease. The used technique can be applied to other common complex diseases as well, and will help to complete patient characterization, in order to evolve towards personalized medicine.</p> </sec> [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (8 ULg)