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See detailRegulation of gill prolactin receptors in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) after a change in salinity or hypophysectomy
Auperin, B.; Rentier-Delrue, Françoise ULg; Martial, Joseph ULg et al

in Journal of Endocrinology (1995), 145(2), 213-20

Prolactin (PRL) receptors in gill tissue have been analyzed in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) after transfer from fresh water (FW) to brackish water (BW). This study has indicated the presence of only ... [more ▼]

Prolactin (PRL) receptors in gill tissue have been analyzed in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) after transfer from fresh water (FW) to brackish water (BW). This study has indicated the presence of only one class of tilapia PRL (tiPRL) receptor whatever the salinity. After transfer, however, the percentage of specific binding of the two forms of tiPRL (tiPRLI and tiPRLII) increased significantly. Scatchard analysis of tiPRLI binding indicated an increase in receptor affinity, an effect which was not accompanied by any change in receptor specificity. Transfer to BW also caused the number of tiPRL receptors to increase rapidly, remaining high in fish adapted to BW for 28 days. Based on the sharp reduction in plasma tiPRLI and tiPRLII levels after transfer to BW, one possible explanation may be that tiPRL itself is an important factor regulating the number of free receptors. This hypothesis finds support in the fact that the number of tiPRL receptors also increased in hypophysectomized fish reared in FW. However, the absence of change in receptor affinity after hypophysectomy suggested that yet other factors are involved in tiPRL receptor regulation during the transfer from FW to BW. The paradoxically high numbers of tiPRL receptors in the gills of BW-adapted tilapia, even though PRL is known to be a FW-adapting hormone, is discussed with regard to the environment in which tilapia live. [less ▲]

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See detailRegulation of growth hormone gene expression: synergistic effects of thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones
Martial, Joseph ULg; Seeburg, Peter H; Guenzi, Doris et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (1977), 74(10), 4293-4295

Cultured rat pituitary cells (GC) respond to thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones by increases in growth hormone production and growth hormone mRNA. When these cells are transferred from medium containing ... [more ▼]

Cultured rat pituitary cells (GC) respond to thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones by increases in growth hormone production and growth hormone mRNA. When these cells are transferred from medium containing normal animal serum (with 1.8 mug of thyroxine per dl) to a medium containing serum from a thyroidectomized calf, "hypothyroid medium" (with no detectable thyroid hormone), growth hormone production decreases markedly. In cells maintained for 5 days in hypothyroid medium, triiodothyronine induces within 50 hr a 17-fold increase in growth hormone production whereas glucocorticoids, during the same time, produce a negligible (3-fold or less) stimulation. In combination, the two hormones promote a 45-fold stimulation. In all instances the changes in growth hormone production are paralleled by changes in the levels of growth hormone mRNA as measured by cell-free translation. The transfer to hypothyroid medium and the hormonal induction do not affect the relative activities of other mRNAs whose products are detectable on polyacrylamide gels. These studies indicate that thyroid hormone can be an activator of the expression of the growth hormone gene. The results also show that triiodothyronine controls the magnitude of the effect of glucocorticoids on growth hormone mRNA, and provide a model for "permissive" triiodothyronine action. The synergistic effect of these two classes of hormone suggests that they increase levels of growth hormone mRNA by different mechanisms. [less ▲]

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See detailRegulation of growth hormone messenger RNA
Martial, Joseph ULg; Seeburg, P. H.; Matulich, D. T. et al

in Monographs on Endocrinology (1979), 12

In cultured rat pituitary cells, glucocorticoids regulate growth hormone production by modulating the number of growth hormone messenger RNA molecules. The effect is quite specific, since only a few other ... [more ▼]

In cultured rat pituitary cells, glucocorticoids regulate growth hormone production by modulating the number of growth hormone messenger RNA molecules. The effect is quite specific, since only a few other mRNAs are affected by the hormones. This response is demonstrated by assays involving cell-free mRNA translation and cDNA-RNA hybridization. Furthermore, the inducibility by the glucocorticoids is regulated by at least one other class of hormones, thyroid hormone. Thus, this system serves as a model for studying not only the glucocorticoid regulation of specific mRNA, but also the control of this regulation by other factors in the target tissue. [less ▲]

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See detailRegulation of growth hormone messenger RNA by thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones
Martial, Joseph ULg; Baxter, John D; Goodman, Howard M et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (1977), 74(5), 1816-20

Thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones stimulate growth hormone synthesis in cultured rat pituitary cells (GC). We have compared changes in growth hormone production and mRNA in these cells. Triiodothyronine ... [more ▼]

Thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones stimulate growth hormone synthesis in cultured rat pituitary cells (GC). We have compared changes in growth hormone production and mRNA in these cells. Triiodothyronine (10 nM) and dexamethasone (1 micron) stimulated increases in growth hormone production by 2.5- and 3.8-fold, respectively. There were corresponding increases in the capacity of RNA from hormone-treated cells to direct synthesis of pregrowth hormone in a wheat germ cell-free translation system, suggesting hormone-regulated increases in growth hormone mRNA. Hormone-induced changes in mRNA were also demonstrated by determining the kinetics of hybridization of a cDNA probe prepared from RNA enriched (about 70%) for growth hormone translational activity with RNA from control and hormone-treated cells. These results suggest that thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones can regulate growth hormone production by influencing the levels of its mRNA. [less ▲]

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See detailRegulation of growth hormone secretion in human trophoblastic cells in culture
Evain-Brion, Danielle; Alsat, Eliane; Mirlesse, Valérie et al

in Hormone Research (1990), 33(6), 256-259

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See detailRegulation of HER-2 oncogene expression by cyclooxygenase-2 and prostaglandin E2
Benoit, Valérie; Relic, Biserka ULg; de Leval, Laurence ULg et al

in Oncogene (2004), 23(8), 1631-1635

The oncoprotein HER-2/neu is a prosurvival factor and its overexpression has been correlated with adverse prognosis in breast cancers. High levels of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a proinflammatory and ... [more ▼]

The oncoprotein HER-2/neu is a prosurvival factor and its overexpression has been correlated with adverse prognosis in breast cancers. High levels of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a proinflammatory and antiapoptotic enzyme, were detected in HER-2-positive tumors and this observation was linked to an HER-2-mediated induction of COX-2 gene transcription. Here, we report that COX-2 expression, and synthesis of its major enzymatic product, PGE2, leads in turn to an enhanced HER-2 expression. Moreover, COX-2 enzymatic inhibition dramatically reduced HER-2 protein levels, efficiently increased the cancer cells sensitility to chemotherapeutic treatment and acted in synergy with HER-2 inhibitor, trastuzumab. Therefore, we propose an original model where HER-2 and COX-2 transcriptionally regulate each other in a positive loop. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (7 ULg)
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See detailRegulation of Histamine Release from Human Bronchoalveolar Lavage Mast Cells by Stem Cell Factor in Several Respiratory Diseases
Louis, Renaud ULg; Tilkin, P.; Poncelet, M. et al

in Allergy (1995), 50(4), 340-8

We investigated the effects of stem cell factor (SCF) on histamine release (HR) from human bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) mast cells. BAL cells were recovered from lavage performed in patients undergoing ... [more ▼]

We investigated the effects of stem cell factor (SCF) on histamine release (HR) from human bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) mast cells. BAL cells were recovered from lavage performed in patients undergoing clinical bronchoscopy. SCF (0.02-20 ng/ml), which is by itself a poor secretagogue (mean +/- SEM HR: 3.7 +/- 0.9%; n = 27), strongly enhanced HR induced by anti-IgE in a concentration-related manner. Significant potentiation began at 0.2 ng/ml (30 +/- 10%; p < 0.05; n = 12) and reached a plateau at 2 ng/ml (40 +/- 10%; P < 0.01 at 2 ng/ml and 45 +/- 10%; P < 0.01 at 20 ng/ml; n = 12). In contrast, SCF failed to enhance HR induced by calcium ionophore A23187. Among the BAL cell samples initially unresponsive to anti-IgE (55% of samples), 36% (10/28) were converted to responders if the cells were shortly preincubated with SCF. In 25% of samples (7/27), SCF (20 ng/ml) caused direct HR of 10 +/- 2.1%. The mast cells which released histamine when challenged with SCF also secreted higher levels of histamine in response to anti-IgE and calcium ionophore than those nonresponsive to SCF. While interleukin (IL)-3 and IL-5 (20 ng/ml) were unable to modulate immunologic HR, GM-CSF (20 ng/ml) produced significant potentiation (P < 0.05), which was, however, smaller than that observed with SCF.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) [less ▲]

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See detailRegulation of HIV late phase transcription by CTIP2
Cherrier, Thomas ULg; Rohr, Olivier

Poster (2008)

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See detailRegulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha protein level during hypoxic conditions by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/glycogen synthase kinase 3beta pathway in HepG2 cells.
Mottet, Denis ULg; Dumont, Valery; Deccache, Yann et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2003), 278(33), 31277-85

Hypoxia initiates an intracellular signaling pathway leading to the activation of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). HIF-1 activity is regulated through different mechanisms ... [more ▼]

Hypoxia initiates an intracellular signaling pathway leading to the activation of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). HIF-1 activity is regulated through different mechanisms involving stabilization of HIF-1alpha, phosphorylations, modifications of redox conditions, and interactions with coactivators. However, it appears that some of these steps can be cell type-specific. Among them, the involvement of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway in the regulation of HIF-1 by hypoxia remains controversial. Here, we investigated the activation state of PI3K/Akt/glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta) in HepG2 cells. Increasing incubation times in hypoxia dramatically decreased both the phosphorylation of Akt and the inhibiting phosphorylation of GSK3beta. The PI3K/Akt pathway was necessary for HIF-1alpha stabilization early during hypoxia. Indeed, its inhibition was sufficient to decrease HIF-1alpha protein level after 5-h incubation in hypoxia. However, longer exposure (16 h) in hypoxia resulted in a decreased HIF-1alpha protein level compared with early exposure (5 h). At that time, Akt was no longer present or active, which resulted in a decrease in the inhibiting phosphorylation of GSK3beta on Ser-9 and hence in an increased GSK3beta activity. GSK3 inhibition reverted the effect of prolonged hypoxia on HIF-1alpha protein level; more stabilized HIF-1alpha was observed as well as increased HIF-1 transcriptional activity. Thus, a prolonged hypoxia activates GSK3beta, which results in decreased HIF-1alpha accumulation. In conclusion, hypoxia induced a biphasic effect on HIF-1alpha stabilization with accumulation in early hypoxia, which depends on an active PI3K/Akt pathway and an inactive GSK3beta, whereas prolonged hypoxia results in the inactivation of Akt and activation of GSK3beta, which then down-regulates the HIF-1 activity through down-regulation of HIF-1alpha accumulation. [less ▲]

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See detailRegulation of innate immunity by inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate
Jia, Y.; Schurmans, Stéphane ULg; Luo, H. R.

in Cell Cycle (Georgetown, Tex.) (2008), 7

Many neutrophil functions are mediated by PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 that exerts its role by mediating protein translocation via binding to their PH-domains. Inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate (Ins(1,3,4,5) P4 ... [more ▼]

Many neutrophil functions are mediated by PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 that exerts its role by mediating protein translocation via binding to their PH-domains. Inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate (Ins(1,3,4,5) P4) binds the same PH domain, competes for its binding to PtdIns(3,4,5)P3, and thus negatively regulates PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 signaling. In neutrophils, chemoattractant stimulation triggers rapid elevation in Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 level. Depletion of Ins(1,3,4,5) P4 by deleting InsP3KB, the major enzyme producing Ins(1,3,4,5) P4 in neutrophils, augments PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 downstream signals, leading to enhanced sensitivity to chemoattractant stimulation, elevated superoxide production, and enhanced neutrophil recruitment to inflamed peritoneal cavity. nsP3KB gene is also expressed in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. In InsP3KB null mice, the bone marrow granulocyte monocyte progenitor (GMP) population is expanded and the proliferation of GMP cells is accelerated. As results, neutrophil production in the bone marrow is enhanced and peripheral blood neutrophil count is elevated. Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 also plays a role in maintaining neutrophil survival. Depletion of Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 leads to accelerated neutrophil spontaneous death. Finally, InsP3KB and Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 are essential components in bacterial killing by neutrophils. Despite of the augmented neutrophil recruitment, the clearance of bacteria in the InsP3KB knockout mice is significantly impaired. Collectively, these findings establish InsP3KB and its product Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 as essential modulators of neutrophil function and innate immunity [less ▲]

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See detailRegulation of insulin secretion by SIRT4, a mitochondrial ADP-ribosyltransferase
Ahuja, Nidhi; Schwer, Bjoern; Carobbio, Stefania et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2007), 282(46),

Sirtuins are homologues of the yeast transcriptional repressor Sir2p and are conserved from bacteria to humans. We report that human SIRT4 is localized to the mitochondria. SIRT4 is a matrix protein and ... [more ▼]

Sirtuins are homologues of the yeast transcriptional repressor Sir2p and are conserved from bacteria to humans. We report that human SIRT4 is localized to the mitochondria. SIRT4 is a matrix protein and becomes cleaved at amino acid 28 after import into mitochondria. Mass spectrometry analysis of proteins that coimmunoprecipitate with SIRT4 identified insulin degrading enzyme and the ADP/ATP carrier proteins, ANT2 and ANT3. SIRT4 exhibits no histone deacetylase activity but functions as an efficient ADP-ribosyltransferase on histones and bovine serum albumin. SIRT4 is expressed in islets of Langerhans and colocalizes with insulin-expressing beta cells. Depletion of SIRT4 from insulin-producing INS-1E cells results in increased insulin secretion in response to glucose. These observations define a new role for mitochondrial SIRT4 in the regulation of insulin secretion. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (3 ULg)
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See detailRegulation of Ion Uptake in Membrane Vesicles from Rat Brain by Thiamine Compounds
Bettendorff, Lucien ULg; Wins, Pierre; Schoffeniels, Ernest

in Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications (1990), 171(3), 1137-1144

We examined the effects of thiamine derivatives on ion uptake in rat brain membrane vesicles. Thiamine triphosphate (1 mM) and pyrithiamine (0.1 mM) increase chloride uptake. Preincubation of crude ... [more ▼]

We examined the effects of thiamine derivatives on ion uptake in rat brain membrane vesicles. Thiamine triphosphate (1 mM) and pyrithiamine (0.1 mM) increase chloride uptake. Preincubation of crude homogenate with thiamine or pyrithiamine increases chloride uptake while oxythiamine has the reverse effect. Thiamine and oxythiamine also affect 22Na+ and 86Rb+ uptake in the same way as for 36Cl- but to a lesser extent. Thiamine-dependent 36Cl- uptake is activated by sodium bicarbonate (10 mM) and partially inhibited by bumetanide (0.1 mM) and 2,4-dinitrophenol (0.1 mM). Preincubation with thiamine increases the thiamine triphosphate content of the vesicles. The hypothesis that TTP is the activator of a particular chloride uptake mechanism is discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailThe regulation of liver iron metabolism
Beguin, Yves ULg; Huebers, H.; Finch, C. A. et al

in Bratter, P.; Schramel, P. (Eds.) Trace element analytical chemistry in medicine and biology, Vol. 5 (1988)

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See detailRegulation of major histocompatibility complex class I expression by NF-kB-related proteins in breast cancer cells
Dejardin, Emmanuel ULg; Deregowski, Valérie; GREIMERS, Roland ULg et al

in Oncogene (1998)

Downregulation of MHC Class I antigens has been observed in many cancers and usually results from a decreased gene transcription. A reporter CAT gene dependent on the MHC Class I kB site or on a longer ... [more ▼]

Downregulation of MHC Class I antigens has been observed in many cancers and usually results from a decreased gene transcription. A reporter CAT gene dependent on the MHC Class I kB site or on a longer promoter is transactivated by NF-kB complexes contain- ing p65 or RelB. p100 as well as IkB-a are potent inhibitors of this transcription and p100 sequesters RelB and p65 complexes in the cytoplasm of breast cancer cells. However, although p100 is highly expressed in a number of breast cancer cell lines, MHC Class I antigen expression was observed on all the cell lines we analysed and could be further induced by stimulation with the cytokines IFN-g or TNF-a. Stable transfection of a unresponsive mutated IkB-a Ser 32-36 expression vector showed that TNF-a induced MHC Cl I expression in an NF-kB-dependent way while IFN-g did it independently of any NF-kB activation. [less ▲]

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See detailRegulation of MAP kinases by the VHR dual-specific phosphatase: implications for cell growth and differentiation.
Cerignoli, Fabio; Rahmouni, Souad ULg; Ronai, Ze'ev et al

in Cell Cycle (Georgetown, Tex.) (2006), 5(19), 2210-5

Although it is well established that a transient activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases Erk and Jnk is a crucial step in most growth promoting signaling pathways, it has also been ... [more ▼]

Although it is well established that a transient activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases Erk and Jnk is a crucial step in most growth promoting signaling pathways, it has also been demonstrated that a prolonged activation of these kinases can induce differentiation, cell cycle arrest, and cell senescence. We recently found that the expression of the 21-kDa human Vaccinia H1-related (VHR) dual-specific phosphatase fluctuates during cell cycle progression and affects Erk and Jnk activity in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Cells lacking VHR arrested at the G(1)/S and G(2)/M transitions of the cell cycle and exhibited senescence phenotypes. Cells lacking VHR upregulated p21(Cip/Waf1) and downregulated many genes for cell cycle regulators, DNA replication, transcription, and mRNA processing. In the absence of VHR, the serum-induced activation of Jnk and Erk was further elevated and was required for the G(1)/S and G(2)/M blocks, which were attenuated upon Jnk and Erk inhibition. Collectively, VHR provides a long sought layer in the regulation of Jnk and Erk during cell cycle progression thereby contributing to cell cycle arrest, differentiation or senescence. [less ▲]

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See detailRegulation of membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase activity by vacuolar H+-ATPases
Maquoi, Erik ULg; Peyrollier, K.; Noël, Agnès ULg et al

in Biochemical Journal (2003), 373(Pt 1), 19-24

Membrane-type I matrix metalloprotemase (MT1-MMP) is a key enzyme in normal development and malignant processes. The regulation of MT1-MMP activity on the cell surface is a complex process involving ... [more ▼]

Membrane-type I matrix metalloprotemase (MT1-MMP) is a key enzyme in normal development and malignant processes. The regulation of MT1-MMP activity on the cell surface is a complex process involving autocatalytic processing, tissue inhibitor of MMPs (TIMP) binding and constitutive internalization. However, the fate of internalized MT1-MMP is not known. Acidification of intracellular vacuolar compartments is essential for membrane trafficking, protein sorting and degradation. This acidification is controlled by vacuolar H+-ATPases, which can be selectively inhibited by bafilomycin-A(1). Here, we treated human tumour cell lines expressing MT1-MMP with bafilomycin-A(1), and analysed its effects on MT1-MMP activity, internalization and processing. We show that the activity of MT1-MMP on the cell surface is constitutively down-regulated through a vacuolar HI-ATPase-dependent degradation process. Blockade of this degradation caused the accumulation of TIMP-free active MT1-MMP molecules on the cell surface, although internalization was not affected. As a consequence of this impaired degradation, pro-MMP-2 activation was strongly enhanced. This study demonstrates that the catalytic activity of MT1-MMP on the cell surface is regulated through a vacuolar H+-ATPase-dependent degradation process. [less ▲]

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See detailRegulation of membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase expression by zonula occludens-2 in human lung cancer cells.
Luczka, E.; Syne, Laïdya ULg; Nawrocki-Raby, B. et al

in Clinical & Experimental Metastasis (2013)

During tumor invasion, tumor epithelial cells acquire migratory and invasive properties involving important phenotypic alterations. Among these changes, one can observe reorganization or a loss of cell ... [more ▼]

During tumor invasion, tumor epithelial cells acquire migratory and invasive properties involving important phenotypic alterations. Among these changes, one can observe reorganization or a loss of cell-cell adhesion complexes such as tight junctions (TJs). TJs are composed of transmembrane proteins (occludin, claudins) linked to the actin cytoskeleton through cytoplasmic adaptor molecules including those of the zonula occludens family (ZO-1, -2, -3). We here evaluated the potential role of ZO-2 in the acquisition of invasive properties by tumor cells. In vivo, we showed a decrease of ZO-2 expression in bronchopulmonary cancers, with a preferential localization in the cytoplasm. In addition, in vitro, the localization of ZO-2 varied according to invasive properties of tumor cells, with a cytoplasmic localization correlating with invasion. In addition, we demonstrated that ZO-2 inhibition increases invasive and migrative capacities of invasive tumor cells. This was associated with an increase of MT1-MMP. These results suggest that ZO-2, besides its structural role in tight junction assembly, can act also as a repressor of tumor progression through its ability to reduce the expression of tumor-promoting genes in invasive tumor cells. [less ▲]

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See detailRegulation of metal homeostasis genes in Arabidopsis halleri
Hanikenne, Marc ULg

Conference (2006, October 19)

Detailed reference viewed: 2 (0 ULg)