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See detailLong-term biogeochemical effects of adding alkalinity into the ocean
Ilyina, Tatiana; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter; Munhoven, Guy ULiege et al

Conference (2011, June 20)

Large-scale perturbations in seawater chemistry brought about by the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2 will go on long after emissions decline or stop. Several geo-engineering approaches have been ... [more ▼]

Large-scale perturbations in seawater chemistry brought about by the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2 will go on long after emissions decline or stop. Several geo-engineering approaches have been suggested to reduce atmospheric CO2 concentrations and ocean acidification. One of them is to enhance weathering processes to remove atmospheric CO2. This method involves dissolving rocks (i.e. limestone, olivine) or adding strong bases (i.e. calcium hydroxide) to the upper ocean. The net effect of these two approaches is to increase ocean alkalinity, thereby increasing the oceanic capacity to take up and store anthropogenic CO2. Another effect of adding alkalinity would be to drive seawater to higher pH values and thus counteract the ongoing ocean acidification. However, whereas adding bases initially only alters alkalinity of seawater, dissolution of carbonates perturbs both, alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon budgets. Thus, on longer time scales, these two methods will likely have different biogeochemical effects in the ocean. Here we test enduring implications of the two approaches for the marine carbon cycle using the global ocean biogeochemical model HAMOCC which also includes marine sediments. In our model scenarios we add alkalinity in amounts proportional to fossil fuel emissions. We compare the long-term effectiveness of the two geo-engineering approaches to decrease atmospheric CO2. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (1 ULiège)
See detailLong-term biogeochemical impacts of liming the ocean
Ilyina, Tatiana; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter; Munhoven, Guy ULiege et al

Conference (2011, December 08)

Fossil fuel CO2 emissions result in large-scale long-term perturbations in seawater chemistry. Oceans take up atmospheric CO2, and several geo-engineering approaches have been suggested to mitigate ... [more ▼]

Fossil fuel CO2 emissions result in large-scale long-term perturbations in seawater chemistry. Oceans take up atmospheric CO2, and several geo-engineering approaches have been suggested to mitigate impacts of CO2 emissions and resulting ocean acidification that are based on this property. One of them is to enhance weathering processes to remove atmospheric CO2. This method involves dissolving rocks (i.e. limestone) or adding strong bases (i.e. calcium hydroxide) in the upper ocean and is termed as liming the oceans. The net effect of this approach is to increase ocean alkalinity, thereby increasing the oceanic capacity to store anthropogenic CO2. Another effect of adding alkalinity would be to drive seawater to higher pH values and thus counteract the ongoing ocean acidification. However, whereas adding bases only alter alkalinity of seawater, dissolution of carbonates perturb both, alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon budgets. Thus, on longer time scales, these two methods will likely have different biogeochemical effects in the ocean. Here we test enduring implications of the two approaches for marine carbon cycle using the global ocean biogeochemical model HAMOCC. In our model scenarios we add alkalinity in the amounts proportional to fossil fuel emissions. We compare the longterm effectiveness of the two geo-engineering approaches to decrease atmospheric CO2. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 137 (6 ULiège)
See detailLong-term Brightness Variations of the Io UV Footprint
Bonfond, Bertrand ULiege; Grodent, Denis ULiege; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULiege et al

Conference (2008, December 01)

Since the finding of the UV Io footprint in 1996, the successive UV instruments on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) allowed us to considerably improve the understanding of the Io-Jupiter electro ... [more ▼]

Since the finding of the UV Io footprint in 1996, the successive UV instruments on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) allowed us to considerably improve the understanding of the Io-Jupiter electro-magnetic interaction and its auroral counterpart. It has been shown that the Io footprint is generally formed by one bright spot preceded or followed by secondary spots whose relative positions are linked to the location of Io in the plasma torus. We also know that these spots experience brightness variations from minutes to hours. The Io footprint brightness varies over hours with the longitude of Io in the Jovian magnetic field (System III longitude) but until recently, huge gaps existed in the longitude coverage. Part of these gaps has now been filled during the latest HST imaging campaign and a more complete spot brightness versus Io System III longitude diagram emerges. Additionally, we compare spot brightness between images obtained a few minutes apart but from opposite hemispheres. Based on images gathered from 1997 to 2007 with the STIS and the ACS cameras, we also show that the footprint morphology and the spots brightness, including their relative brightness, can vary significantly from one year to another. Finally, we discuss the brightness variations from hours to years in terms of plasma torus density and position of Io in the plasma torus as well as in Jovian magnetic field. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (5 ULiège)
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See detailLong-term care and births timing
Pestieau, Pierre ULiege; Ponthiere, Grégory

in Journal of Health Economics (2016), 50

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULiège)
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See detailLong-term care and capital accumulation: the impact of the State, the market and the family
Pestieau, Pierre ULiege; Canta, Chiara; Thibault, Emmanuel

in Economic Theory (2016), 61

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (0 ULiège)
See detailLong-Term Care and Myopic Couples
Klimaviciute, Justina ULiege

Conference (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (9 ULiège)
See detailLong-Term Care and Myopic Couples
Klimaviciute, Justina ULiege

Conference (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (6 ULiège)
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See detailLong-Term Care Insurance and Family
Pestieau, Pierre ULiege; Canta, Chiara

in B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (2 ULiège)
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See detailLong-Term Care Insurance and Family Norms
Pestieau, Pierre ULiege; Canta, Chiara

in The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy (2013), 14(1), 1-28

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (3 ULiège)
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See detailLong-Term Care Insurance and Intra-family Moral Hazard: Fixed vs Proportional Insurance Benefits
Klimaviciute, Justina ULiege

in GENEVA Risk & Insurance Review (2017)

Pauly (1990) argues that an explanation for the low long-term care (LTC) insurance demand could be intra-family moral hazard: parents might refuse to buy insurance since it reduces children’s incentives ... [more ▼]

Pauly (1990) argues that an explanation for the low long-term care (LTC) insurance demand could be intra-family moral hazard: parents might refuse to buy insurance since it reduces children’s incentives to provide care. This paper raises and explores the idea that the extent of intra-family moral hazard and non-purchase of LTC insurance might differ when insurance benefits are fixed and when they are proportional to LTC expenditures. It shows that fixed benefits limit and might even eliminate intra-family moral hazard, while the effect of proportional benefits is at best ambiguous. Consequently, non-purchase of insurance is less likely with fixed benefits. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (7 ULiège)
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See detailLong-term care insurance and optimal taxation for altruistic children
Jousten, Alain ULiege; Lipszyc, B.; Marchand, Maurice et al

in Finanzarchiv (2005), 61(1), 1-18

We model long-term care insurance in an optimal taxation framework. Every adult decides upon the amount and type of care he purchases for his dependent parent. We consider two alternatives: nursing-home ... [more ▼]

We model long-term care insurance in an optimal taxation framework. Every adult decides upon the amount and type of care he purchases for his dependent parent. We consider two alternatives: nursing-home care provided by the government, and home care paid by the child with some lump-sum subsidy by the government. The only source of information asymmetry is the government's inability to observe the degree of altruism of the adult child for his/her parent. Further tax collection entails some social costs. In such a second-best setting, we show that the quality of institutional care has to be kept relatively low and that compared to altruistic children, nonaltruistic ones enjoy a high level of consumption. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (10 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailLong-term care insurance and the family: does the availability of potential caregivers substitute for long-term care insurance?
Bonsang, Eric; Schoenmaeckers, Jérome ULiege

in Ageing in Europe - Supporting Policies for an Inclusive Society (2015)

The needs for long-term care (LTC) are expected to increase gradually due to population ageing in Europe. The population aged 65 or older, which is more at risk of dependency, will more than double by ... [more ▼]

The needs for long-term care (LTC) are expected to increase gradually due to population ageing in Europe. The population aged 65 or older, which is more at risk of dependency, will more than double by 2050 according to the forecasts of the European Union (Pestieau & Ponthière 2010). It is however unclear if the population in need for care will increase in the same proportion due to compression of morbidity (potential increase of life expectancy in good health). In assessing the adequacy of the financing and provision of long-term care, it is important to take into account the abilities of the countries to rely on the informal provision of care to older individuals in the future. Recent studies, using inter alia SHARE data (e.g. Bolin et al. 2008), showed that long-term care is mainly provided by informal caregivers. In this paper, we show that children and especially daughters play an important role in the supply of informal care. Then we prove that the availability of potential informal caregivers, i.e. the children, decreases the probability of purchasing private voluntary long-term care insurance. Future research on long-term care should focus on characteristics of potential substitutes for insurance policies (children and partner). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (0 ULiège)
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See detailLong-term care social insurance. How to avoid big losses?
Klimaviciute, Justina ULiege; Pestieau, Pierre ULiege

E-print/Working paper (2016)

Long-term care (LTC) needs are expected to rapidly increase in the next decades and at the same time the main provider of LTC, namely the family is stalling. This calls for more involvement of the state ... [more ▼]

Long-term care (LTC) needs are expected to rapidly increase in the next decades and at the same time the main provider of LTC, namely the family is stalling. This calls for more involvement of the state that today covers less than 20% of these needs and most often in an inconsistent way. Besides the need to help the poor dependent, there is a mounting concern in the middlec lass that a number of dependent people are incurring costs that could force them to sell all their assets. In this paper we study the design of a social insurance that meets this concern. Following Arrow (1963), we suggest a policy that is characterized by complete insurance above a deductible amount. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (0 ULiège)
See detailLong-term care social insurance. How to avoid big losses?
Klimaviciute, Justina ULiege; Pestieau, Pierre ULiege

Scientific conference (2017, February 10)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (3 ULiège)
See detailLong-term care social insurance. How to avoid big losses?
Klimaviciute, Justina ULiege; Pestieau, Pierre ULiege

Scientific conference (2016, November 15)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (1 ULiège)
See detailLong-term care social insurance. How to avoid big losses?
Klimaviciute, Justina ULiege; Pestieau, Pierre ULiege

Scientific conference (2016, November 10)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (2 ULiège)
See detailLong-term care social insurance. How to avoid big losses?
Klimaviciute, Justina ULiege; Pestieau, Pierre ULiege

Conference (2016, June 13)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (3 ULiège)
See detailLong-term care social insurance. How to avoid big losses?
Klimaviciute, Justina ULiege; Pestieau, Pierre ULiege

Scientific conference (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (14 ULiège)
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See detailLong-term care social insurance: How to avoid big losses?
Klimaviciute, Justina ULiege; Pestieau, Pierre ULiege

in International Tax and Public Finance (2017)

Long-term care (LTC) needs are expected to rapidly increase in the next decades, and at the same time, the main provider of LTC, namely the family, is stalling. This calls for more involvement of the ... [more ▼]

Long-term care (LTC) needs are expected to rapidly increase in the next decades, and at the same time, the main provider of LTC, namely the family, is stalling. This calls for more involvement of the state that today covers <20% of these needs and most often in an inconsistent way. Besides the need to help the dependent poor, there is a mounting concern in the middle class that a number of dependent people are incurring costs that could force them to sell all their assets. In this paper, we study the design of a social insurance program that meets this concern. Following Arrow (Am Econ Rev 53:941–973, 1963), we suggest a policy that is characterized by complete insurance above a deductible amount. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (1 ULiège)
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See detailLong-Term Care: the State, the Market and the Family
Motohiro, Sato; Pestieau, Pierre ULiege

in Economica (2008), (75), 435-454

In this paper we study the optimal design of a long term care policy in a setting that includes three types of care to dependent parents: public nursing, private nursing and assistance in time by children ... [more ▼]

In this paper we study the optimal design of a long term care policy in a setting that includes three types of care to dependent parents: public nursing, private nursing and assistance in time by children. Private nursing can be financed either by financial aid from children or by private insurance. The social planner can use a number of instruments: public nursing, subsidy to aiding children, subsidy to private insurance premiums, all financed by a flat tax on earnings. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (2 ULiège)