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See detailPsychosomatique
TRIFFAUX, Jean-Marc ULg

Learning material (2012)

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See detailPsychostatistique descriptive et inférentielle Partim 1 - Exercices
Quertemont, Etienne ULg

Learning material (2009)

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See detailPsychostatistique descriptive et inférentielle Partim 1 - Théorie
Quertemont, Etienne ULg

Learning material (2009)

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See detailPsychostatistique descriptive et inférentielle Partim 2 - Exercices
Quertemont, Etienne ULg

Learning material (2009)

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See detailPsychostatistique descriptive et inférentielle Partim 2 - Théorie
Quertemont, Etienne ULg

Learning material (2009)

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See detailThe psychostimulant and rewarding effects of cocaine in histidine decarboxylase knockout mice do not support the hypothesis of an inhibitory function of histamine on reward
Brabant, Christian ULg; Quertemont, Etienne ULg; Anaclet, Christelle et al

in Psychopharmacology (2007), 190(2), 251-263

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Lesion studies have shown that the tuberomammillary nucleus (TM) exerts inhibitory effects on the brain reward system. To determine whether histamine from the TM is involved in ... [more ▼]

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Lesion studies have shown that the tuberomammillary nucleus (TM) exerts inhibitory effects on the brain reward system. To determine whether histamine from the TM is involved in that reward inhibitory function, we assessed the stimulant and rewarding effects of cocaine in knockout mice lacking histidine decarboxylase (HDC KO mice), the histamine-synthesizing enzyme. If histamine actually plays an inhibitory role in reward, then it would be expected that mice lacking histamine would be more sensitive to the behavioral effects of cocaine. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The first experiment characterized spontaneous locomotion and cocaine-induced hyperactivity (0, 8, and 16 mg/kg, i.p.) in wild-type and HDC KO mice. The rewarding effects of cocaine were investigated in a second experiment with the place-conditioning technique. RESULTS: The first experiment demonstrated that histidine decarboxylase mice showed reduced exploratory behaviors but normal habituation to the test chambers. After habituation to the test chambers, HDC KO mice were slightly, but significantly, less stimulated by cocaine than control mice. This finding was replicated in the second experiment, when cocaine-induced activity was monitored with the place-conditioning apparatus. Furthermore, a significant place preference was present in both genotypes for 8 and 16 mg/kg cocaine, but not for 2 and 4 mg/kg. CONCLUSIONS: Our data confirm previous results demonstrating that HDC KO mice show reduced exploratory behaviors. However, contrary to the hypothesis that histamine plays an inhibitory role in reward, histamine-deficient mice were not more responsive to the psychostimulant effects of cocaine. [less ▲]

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See detailLes psychostimulants.
Pinto, Emmanuel ULg; Pitchot, William ULg; Ansseau, Marc ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2008), 63

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See detailLes psychothérapies
Triffaux, Jean-Marc ULg

Learning material (2011)

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See detailLES PSYCHOTHERAPIES-2012
Triffaux, Jean-Marc ULg

Learning material (2012)

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See detailPsychotic reactions to zolpidem.
Ansseau, Marc ULg; Pitchot, William ULg; Hansenne, Michel ULg et al

in Lancet (1992), 339(8796), 809

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See detailLe psychotraumatisme en quête de reconnaissance
Scantamburlo, Gabrielle ULg

Conference (2013)

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See detailPsychotropes au lieu de vie des personnes âgées avec ou sans démence
RICOUR, Céline ULg; Brutsaert, S; Boland, B

in Revue Prescrire (La) (2011), 31(327), 67

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See detailPsychotropes, alcool et sécurité routière en Belgique
Charlier, Corinne ULg

Conference (1998)

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See detailPsychrophiles and their cold-active enzymes
Gerday, Charles ULg; Feller, Georges ULg

Conference (2001)

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See detailPsychrophiles et thermophiles : un problème d’enzyme
Gerday, Charles ULg; Aittaleb, M.; Arpigny, J. L. et al

in Chimie Nouvelle (1997), 15

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See detailPsychrophilic Enzymes: A Thermodynamic Challenge
Gerday, Charles ULg; Aittaleb, Mohamed; Arpigny, Jean Louis et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (1997), 1342(2), 119-31

Psychrophilic microorganisms, hosts of permanently cold habitats, produce enzymes which are adapted to work at low temperatures. When compared to their mesophilic counterparts, these enzymes display a ... [more ▼]

Psychrophilic microorganisms, hosts of permanently cold habitats, produce enzymes which are adapted to work at low temperatures. When compared to their mesophilic counterparts, these enzymes display a higher catalytic efficiency over a temperature range of roughly 0-30 degrees C and a high thermosensitivity. The molecular characteristics of cold enzymes originating from Antarctic bacteria have been approached through protein modelling and X-ray crystallography. The deduced three-dimensional structures of cold alpha-amylase, beta-lactamase, lipase and subtilisin have been compared to their mesophilic homologs. It appears that the molecular adaptation resides in a weakening of the intramolecular interactions, and in some cases in an increase of the interaction with the solvent, leading to more flexible molecular edifices capable of performing catalysis at a lower energy cost. [less ▲]

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See detailPsychrophilic enzymes: cool responses to chilly problems
Roulling, Frédéric ULg; Piette, Florence ULg; Cipolla, Alexandre ULg et al

in Horikoshi, K.; Antranikian, G.; Bull, A. (Eds.) et al Extremophiles Handbook (2011)

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See detailPsychrophilic enzymes: from folding to function and biotechnology
Feller, Georges ULg

in Scientifica (2013), 2013(Article ID 512840), 1-28

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See detailPsychrophilic enzymes: Hot topics in cold adaptation
Feller, Georges ULg; Gerday, Charles ULg

in Nature Reviews Microbiology (2003), 1(3), 200-208

More than three-quarters of the Earth's surface is occupied by cold ecosystems, including the ocean depths, and polar and alpine regions. These permanently cold environments have been successfully ... [more ▼]

More than three-quarters of the Earth's surface is occupied by cold ecosystems, including the ocean depths, and polar and alpine regions. These permanently cold environments have been successfully colonized by a class of extremophilic microorganisms that are known as psychrophiles (which literally means cold-loving). The ability to thrive at temperatures that are close to, or below, the freezing point of water requires a vast array of adaptations to maintain the metabolic rates and sustained growth compatible with life in these severe environmental conditions. [less ▲]

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