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See detailMT4-MMP, a potential prognostic factor in triple negative breast cancer
Yip, Cassandre ULg; FOIDART, Pierre ULg; SOMJA, Joan ULg et al

Scientific conference (2015, December 03)

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See detailMT4-MMP, a potential therapeutic target in triple negative breast cancer
Yip, Cassandre ULg; FOIDART, Pierre ULg; SOMJA, Joan ULg et al

Poster (2015, September)

MT4-MMP and EGFR axis may have a significant role in patient outcome and response to EGFR targeted therapy. This axis is clinically relevant in TNBC, the most aggressive breast cancer subtype. TNBC are ... [more ▼]

MT4-MMP and EGFR axis may have a significant role in patient outcome and response to EGFR targeted therapy. This axis is clinically relevant in TNBC, the most aggressive breast cancer subtype. TNBC are known to express high level of EGFR and treatment options are limited due to the non response of to the EGFR targeted therapy. Expression levels of MT4-MMP and EGFR in TNBC may be used as prognosis factor for the selection of patient who may respond or not to EGFR targeted therapy. Also, our data shed light and the potential therapeutic option of targeting both MT4-MMP and EGFR in TNBC. [less ▲]

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See detailMtDNA haplogroups define two phenotypes of osteoarthritis
Rego-Perez, I; Fernandez-Moreno, M; DEBERG, Michelle ULg et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2010), 62

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See detailMTHFR C677T polymorphism and susceptibility to migraine with aura
Magis, Delphine ULg; Coppola, Gianluca; Allena, Marta et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2005, October), 25(10), 863-864

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See detailmTOR inhibitors in advanced breast cancer: ready for prime time?
Martin, Lesley-Ann; Andre, Fabrice; Campone, Mario et al

in Cancer Treatment Reviews (2013), 39(7), 742-52

Current therapeutic approaches for advanced breast cancer frequently target receptors mediating cell survival and proliferation, such as the estrogen receptor and/or progesterone receptor and human ... [more ▼]

Current therapeutic approaches for advanced breast cancer frequently target receptors mediating cell survival and proliferation, such as the estrogen receptor and/or progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2. Although these approaches are effective for many patients, treatment resistance is common. Therefore, new treatment approaches are needed for patients with advanced breast cancer. Mammalian target of rapamycin is a highly conserved serine-threonine kinase that acts as a major signaling hub that integrates and synergizes with cellular proliferation, survival, and/or motility signals mediated by estrogen receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2, and other receptor tyrosine kinases. Dysregulation of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling occurs in various tumor types, including breast cancer, and has been associated with cancer pathogenesis, disease progression, and treatment resistance. Recent clinical trials show that combined inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin and estrogen receptor represents an effective strategy for treating hormone receptor-positive advanced breast cancer progressing on nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor therapy, and data from ongoing trials combining mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition with human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-targeted therapy are awaited. This review focuses on the molecular rationale underlying strategies to enhance sensitivity to treatment in hormone receptor-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive advanced breast cancer, the clinical efficacy of such approaches, and future perspectives. [less ▲]

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See detailA much lower density for the transiting extrasolar planet WASP-7 (Research Note)
Southworth, J.; Dominik, M.; Jorgensen, U~G et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2011), 527

We present the first high-precision photometry of the transiting extrasolar planetary system WASP-7, obtained using telescope defocussing techniques and reaching a scatter of 0.68 mmag per point. We find ... [more ▼]

We present the first high-precision photometry of the transiting extrasolar planetary system WASP-7, obtained using telescope defocussing techniques and reaching a scatter of 0.68 mmag per point. We find that the transit depth is greater and that the host star is more evolved than previously thought. The planet has a significantly larger radius (1.330 +/- 0.093 Rjup versus 0.915 +0.046 -0.040 Rjup) and much lower density (0.41 +/- 0.10 rhojup versus 1.26 +0.25 -0.21 rhojup) and surface gravity (13.4 +/- 2.6 m/s2 versus 26.4 +4.4 -4.0 m/s2) than previous measurements showed. Based on the revised properties it is no longer an outlier in planetary mass--radius and period--gravity diagrams. We also obtain a more precise transit ephemeris for the WASP-7 system. [less ▲]

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See detailA much lower density for the transiting extrasolar planet WASP-7.
Southworth, J.; Dominik, M.; Jorgensen, U~G et al

Textual, factual or bibliographical database (2011)

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See detailMucilage and polysaccharides in the halophyte plant species Kosteletzkya virginica : Localozation and composition in relation to salt stress
Ghanem, Michel Edmond; Han, Rui-Ming; Classen, Birgit et al

in Journal of Plant Physiology (2010), 167

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See detailA mucin-enriched fermentation model to assess prebiotic potential of new indigestible carbohydrates
Boudry, Christelle ULg; Tran, Thi Hanh Tham ULg; Blaise, Yannick ULg et al

in 64th Annual Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science (2013, August 29)

Screening the prebiotic potential of novel indigestible carbohydrates (ICH) is a challenge for feed and food industry and in vitro models are increasingly used for such purposes. Recently extracellular ... [more ▼]

Screening the prebiotic potential of novel indigestible carbohydrates (ICH) is a challenge for feed and food industry and in vitro models are increasingly used for such purposes. Recently extracellular binding proteins responsible for the adherence to intestinal mucus were described for several Lactobacillus species. As this genus is known for its beneficial effect on gut health, we enriched the in vitro gas fermentation model with mucin in order to evaluate the prebiotic potential of 5 ICH. Mucin-coated microcosms (MCM) were prepared as described by Van den Abbeele et al. (2012, Microbial Biotechnology, 5, 106-115) and introduced in the fermentation bottles with an inoculum prepared from fresh faeces of 3 sows mixed with a nutritive buffer solution. Fermentation was performed at 39°C, using 200 mg of substrate, 30 ml of inoculum and 6 MCM, yielding approx. 20 mg mucin each, in 140 ml glass bottles. A first study was performed with inulin and cellulose as substrates, with and without mucus in the bottles. A second study was performed with 5 substrates (inulin, IMO, beet pulp POS, cellobiose and gluconate) in presence of mucus. After 8 and 72h, SCFA and the microflora of fermentation broth was analysed as well as the microflora on the MCM. The comparison of the microflora evolution with and without mucus showed a better development of the Lactobacillus in the fermentation broth, mainly in presence of inulin. The development of the Lactobacillus genus allowed the classification of the 5 substrates tested in the second study (Inulin > IMO > Gluconate > Cellobiose > POS)(P < 0.05) which was not possible without mucus (P > 0.05). Inulin and IMO showed also the highest development of Bifidobacteria (P < 0.05) and the highest levels of butyrate production (P < 0.05) compared to the three other substrates, indicating a high prebiotic potential. [less ▲]

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See detailMucoadhesive cellulosic derivative sponges as drug delivery system for vaginal application
Furst, Tania ULg; Piette, Marie ULg; Lechanteur, Anna ULg et al

in European Journal of Pharmaceutics & Biopharmaceutics (2015)

Vaginal delivery of active drugs has been largely studied for local and systemic applications. It is well known that vagina is a complex route, due to physiological and non-physiological changes ... [more ▼]

Vaginal delivery of active drugs has been largely studied for local and systemic applications. It is well known that vagina is a complex route, due to physiological and non-physiological changes. Therefore, in order to achieve a prolonged local effect, these variations have to be considered. The aim of this study was to formulate and to characterize a solid system, called sponges, obtained by lyophilization of cellulosic derivative (HEC 250M) hydrogels. These sponges have to meet particular criteria to be adapted for vaginal application: they have to adhere to the vaginal cavity and to be rehydrated by the small amount of vaginal fluids. Moreover, they have to be easily manipulated and to be stable. Three freezing temperatures have been tested to prepare sponges ( 15 C, 25 C, 35 C). By SE analyzes, it was observed that the pores into the sponges were smaller and numerous as the freezing temperature decreases. However, this temperature did not have any influence on the rehydration speed that was rather influenced by the HEC concentration. Viscosity and mucoadhesive strength of hydrogels and corresponding sponges were also measured. It appeared that these parameters are mainly dépendent on the HEC concentration. These mucoadhesive sponges can be considered as potential drug delivery systems intended for vaginal application. [less ▲]

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See detailMucociliary function testing in dogs.
Peeters, Dominique ULg; Clercx, Cécile ULg; Mc Entee, Kathleen ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 11th Annual Congress of the ESVIM (2001)

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See detailMucormycose invasive du poumon et du rachis dorsal.
De Pasqual, Aurelie ULg; Deprez, Manuel ULg; Ghaye, Benoît ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2008), 63

Nous rapportons le cas d'un patient de 67 ans atteint d'un syndrome myélodysplasique et qui a développé une mucormycose pulmonaire avec extension tout à fait exceptionnelle vers le rachis dorsal ... [more ▼]

Nous rapportons le cas d'un patient de 67 ans atteint d'un syndrome myélodysplasique et qui a développé une mucormycose pulmonaire avec extension tout à fait exceptionnelle vers le rachis dorsal responsable d'un paraplégie aiguë. Après échec d'un traitement probabiliste anti-aspergillaire, c'est finalement l'analyse des prélèvements obtenus lors de la laminectomie décompressive qui a fourni le diagnostic mycologique. En raison d'une altération majeure de l'état général, la lobectomie prévue n'a pu être réalisée et malgré l'adaptation du traitement antifongique (Abelcet, Posaconazole), le patient est décédé. La mucormycose (ou zygomycose) pulmonaire est une infection fongique peu commune qui touche essentiellement les patients immuno-déprimés. Le champignon pathogène fait partie des zygomycètes dont la caractéristique principale est la capacité d'angio-invasion. L'invasion périneurale est une autre voie de propagation récemment mise en évidence. Les difficultés thérapeutiques associées à cette pathologie sont liées au terrain d'immunodépression, aux difficultés d'obtenir rapidement un diagnostic précis ainsi qu'à l'absence de sensibilité du Mucor aux antifongiques récemment introduits (V-Fend, Cancidas). Ceci souligne le risque inhérent à un traitement antifongique empirique par ces agents et la nécessité d'un prélèvement biopsique précoce en cas de non-réponse au traitement. [less ▲]

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See detailMucosal Gene Expression of Antimicrobial Peptides in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Before and After First Infliximab Treatment
Arijs, I.; De Hertogh, G.; Lemaire, K. et al

in PLoS ONE (2009), 4(11), 7984

Background: Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) protect the host intestinal mucosa against microorganisms. Abnormal expression of defensins was shown in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but it is not clear ... [more ▼]

Background: Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) protect the host intestinal mucosa against microorganisms. Abnormal expression of defensins was shown in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but it is not clear whether this is a primary defect. We investigated the impact of anti-inflammatory therapy with infliximab on the mucosal gene expression of AMPs in IBD. Methodology/Principal Findings: Mucosal gene expression of 81 AMPs was assessed in 61 IBD patients before and 4-6 weeks after their first infliximab infusion and in 12 control patients, using Affymetrix arrays. Quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to confirm microarray data. The dysregulation of many AMPs in colonic IBD in comparison with control colons was widely restored by infliximab therapy, and only DEFB1 expression remained significantly decreased after therapy in the colonic mucosa of IBD responders to infliximab. In ileal Crohn's disease (CD), expression of two neuropeptides with antimicrobial activity, PYY and CHGB, was significantly decreased before therapy compared to control ileums, and ileal PYY expression remained significantly decreased after therapy in CD responders. Expression of the downregulated AMPs before and after treatment (DEFB1 and PYY) correlated with villin 1 expression, a gut epithelial cell marker, indicating that the decrease is a consequence of epithelial damage. Conclusions/Significance: Our study shows that the dysregulation of AMPs in IBD mucosa is the consequence of inflammation, but may be responsible for perpetuation of inflammation due to ineffective clearance of microorganisms. [less ▲]

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See detailMucosal gene expression of cell adhesion molecules, chemokines, and chemokine receptors in patients with inflammatory bowel disease before and after infliximab treatment.
Arijs, Ingrid; De Hertogh, Gert; Machiels, Kathleen et al

in American Journal of Gastroenterology (2011), 106(4), 748-61

OBJECTIVES: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by a continuous influx of leukocytes into the gut wall. This migration is regulated by cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and selective ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by a continuous influx of leukocytes into the gut wall. This migration is regulated by cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and selective antimigration therapies have been developed. This study investigated the effect of infliximab therapy on the mucosal gene expression of CAMs in IBD. METHODS: Mucosal gene expression of 69 leukocyte/endothelial CAMs and E-cadherin was investigated in 61 IBD patients before and after first infliximab infusion and in 12 normal controls, using Affymetrix gene expression microarrays. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR (qRT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, and western blotting were used to confirm the microarray data. RESULTS: When compared with control colons, the colonic mucosal gene expression of most leukocyte/endothelial adhesion molecules was upregulated and E-cadherin gene expression was downregulated in active colonic IBD (IBDc) before therapy, with no significant colonic gene expression differences between ulcerative colitis and colonic Crohn's disease. Infliximab therapy restored the upregulations of leukocyte CAMs in IBDc responders to infliximab that paralleled the disappearance of the inflammatory cells from the colonic lamina propria. Also, the colonic gene expression of endothelial CAMs and of most chemokines/chemokine receptors returned to normal after therapy in IBDc responders, and only CCL20 and CXCL1-2 expression remained increased after therapy in IBDc responders vs. control colons. When compared with control ileums, the ileal gene expression of MADCAM1, THY1, PECAM1, CCL28, CXCL1, -2, -5, -6, and -11, and IL8 was increased and CD58 expression was decreased in active ileal Crohn's disease (CDi) before therapy, and none of the genes remained dysregulated after therapy in CDi responders vs. control ileums. This microarray study identified a number of interesting targets for antiadhesion therapy including PECAM1, IL8, and CCL20, besides the currently studied alpha4beta7 integrin-MADCAM1 axis. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that many leukocyte/endothelial CAMs and chemokines/chemokine receptors are upregulated in inflamed IBD mucosa. Controlling the inflammation with infliximab restores most of these dysregulations in IBD. These results show that at least part of the mechanism of anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha therapy goes through downregulation of certain adhesion molecules. [less ▲]

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