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See detailLong-Term Care and Myopic Couples
Klimaviciute, Justina ULiege

Conference (2015)

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See detailLong-Term Care and Myopic Couples
Klimaviciute, Justina ULiege

Conference (2015)

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See detailLong-Term Care Insurance and Family
Pestieau, Pierre ULiege; Canta, Chiara

in B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy (2014)

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See detailLong-Term Care Insurance and Family Norms
Pestieau, Pierre ULiege; Canta, Chiara

in The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy (2013), 14(1), 1-28

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See detailLong-Term Care Insurance and Intra-family Moral Hazard: Fixed vs Proportional Insurance Benefits
Klimaviciute, Justina ULiege

in GENEVA Risk & Insurance Review (2017)

Pauly (1990) argues that an explanation for the low long-term care (LTC) insurance demand could be intra-family moral hazard: parents might refuse to buy insurance since it reduces children’s incentives ... [more ▼]

Pauly (1990) argues that an explanation for the low long-term care (LTC) insurance demand could be intra-family moral hazard: parents might refuse to buy insurance since it reduces children’s incentives to provide care. This paper raises and explores the idea that the extent of intra-family moral hazard and non-purchase of LTC insurance might differ when insurance benefits are fixed and when they are proportional to LTC expenditures. It shows that fixed benefits limit and might even eliminate intra-family moral hazard, while the effect of proportional benefits is at best ambiguous. Consequently, non-purchase of insurance is less likely with fixed benefits. [less ▲]

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See detailLong-term care insurance and optimal taxation for altruistic children
Jousten, Alain ULiege; Lipszyc, B.; Marchand, Maurice et al

in Finanzarchiv (2005), 61(1), 1-18

We model long-term care insurance in an optimal taxation framework. Every adult decides upon the amount and type of care he purchases for his dependent parent. We consider two alternatives: nursing-home ... [more ▼]

We model long-term care insurance in an optimal taxation framework. Every adult decides upon the amount and type of care he purchases for his dependent parent. We consider two alternatives: nursing-home care provided by the government, and home care paid by the child with some lump-sum subsidy by the government. The only source of information asymmetry is the government's inability to observe the degree of altruism of the adult child for his/her parent. Further tax collection entails some social costs. In such a second-best setting, we show that the quality of institutional care has to be kept relatively low and that compared to altruistic children, nonaltruistic ones enjoy a high level of consumption. [less ▲]

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See detailLong-term care insurance and the family: does the availability of potential caregivers substitute for long-term care insurance?
Bonsang, Eric; Schoenmaeckers, Jérome ULiege

in Ageing in Europe - Supporting Policies for an Inclusive Society (2015)

The needs for long-term care (LTC) are expected to increase gradually due to population ageing in Europe. The population aged 65 or older, which is more at risk of dependency, will more than double by ... [more ▼]

The needs for long-term care (LTC) are expected to increase gradually due to population ageing in Europe. The population aged 65 or older, which is more at risk of dependency, will more than double by 2050 according to the forecasts of the European Union (Pestieau & Ponthière 2010). It is however unclear if the population in need for care will increase in the same proportion due to compression of morbidity (potential increase of life expectancy in good health). In assessing the adequacy of the financing and provision of long-term care, it is important to take into account the abilities of the countries to rely on the informal provision of care to older individuals in the future. Recent studies, using inter alia SHARE data (e.g. Bolin et al. 2008), showed that long-term care is mainly provided by informal caregivers. In this paper, we show that children and especially daughters play an important role in the supply of informal care. Then we prove that the availability of potential informal caregivers, i.e. the children, decreases the probability of purchasing private voluntary long-term care insurance. Future research on long-term care should focus on characteristics of potential substitutes for insurance policies (children and partner). [less ▲]

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See detailLong-term care social insurance. How to avoid big losses?
Klimaviciute, Justina ULiege; Pestieau, Pierre ULiege

E-print/Working paper (2016)

Long-term care (LTC) needs are expected to rapidly increase in the next decades and at the same time the main provider of LTC, namely the family is stalling. This calls for more involvement of the state ... [more ▼]

Long-term care (LTC) needs are expected to rapidly increase in the next decades and at the same time the main provider of LTC, namely the family is stalling. This calls for more involvement of the state that today covers less than 20% of these needs and most often in an inconsistent way. Besides the need to help the poor dependent, there is a mounting concern in the middlec lass that a number of dependent people are incurring costs that could force them to sell all their assets. In this paper we study the design of a social insurance that meets this concern. Following Arrow (1963), we suggest a policy that is characterized by complete insurance above a deductible amount. [less ▲]

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See detailLong-term care social insurance. How to avoid big losses?
Klimaviciute, Justina ULiege; Pestieau, Pierre ULiege

Scientific conference (2017, February 10)

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See detailLong-term care social insurance. How to avoid big losses?
Klimaviciute, Justina ULiege; Pestieau, Pierre ULiege

Scientific conference (2016, November 15)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (1 ULiège)
See detailLong-term care social insurance. How to avoid big losses?
Klimaviciute, Justina ULiege; Pestieau, Pierre ULiege

Scientific conference (2016, November 10)

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See detailLong-term care social insurance. How to avoid big losses?
Klimaviciute, Justina ULiege; Pestieau, Pierre ULiege

Conference (2016, June 13)

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See detailLong-term care social insurance. How to avoid big losses?
Klimaviciute, Justina ULiege; Pestieau, Pierre ULiege

Scientific conference (2015)

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See detailLong-term care social insurance: How to avoid big losses?
Klimaviciute, Justina ULiege; Pestieau, Pierre ULiege

in International Tax and Public Finance (2017)

Long-term care (LTC) needs are expected to rapidly increase in the next decades, and at the same time, the main provider of LTC, namely the family, is stalling. This calls for more involvement of the ... [more ▼]

Long-term care (LTC) needs are expected to rapidly increase in the next decades, and at the same time, the main provider of LTC, namely the family, is stalling. This calls for more involvement of the state that today covers <20% of these needs and most often in an inconsistent way. Besides the need to help the dependent poor, there is a mounting concern in the middle class that a number of dependent people are incurring costs that could force them to sell all their assets. In this paper, we study the design of a social insurance program that meets this concern. Following Arrow (Am Econ Rev 53:941–973, 1963), we suggest a policy that is characterized by complete insurance above a deductible amount. [less ▲]

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See detailLong-Term Care: the State, the Market and the Family
Motohiro, Sato; Pestieau, Pierre ULiege

in Economica (2008), (75), 435-454

In this paper we study the optimal design of a long term care policy in a setting that includes three types of care to dependent parents: public nursing, private nursing and assistance in time by children ... [more ▼]

In this paper we study the optimal design of a long term care policy in a setting that includes three types of care to dependent parents: public nursing, private nursing and assistance in time by children. Private nursing can be financed either by financial aid from children or by private insurance. The social planner can use a number of instruments: public nursing, subsidy to aiding children, subsidy to private insurance premiums, all financed by a flat tax on earnings. [less ▲]

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See detailLong-term climate commitments projected with climate-carbon cycle models
Plattner, G. K.; Knutti, R.; Joos, F. et al

in Journal of Climate (2008), 21(12), 2721-2751

Eight earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) are used to project climate change commitments for the recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC's) Fourth Assessment Report ... [more ▼]

Eight earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) are used to project climate change commitments for the recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC's) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4). Simulations are run until the year 3000 A. D. and extend substantially farther into the future than conceptually similar simulations with atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) coupled to carbon cycle models. In this paper the following are investigated: 1) the climate change commitment in response to stabilized greenhouse gases and stabilized total radiative forcing, 2) the climate change commitment in response to earlier CO2 emissions, and 3) emission trajectories for profiles leading to the stabilization of atmospheric CO2 and their uncertainties due to carbon cycle processes. Results over the twenty-first century compare reasonably well with results from AOGCMs, and the suite of EMICs proves well suited to complement more complex models. Substantial climate change commitments for sea level rise and global mean surface temperature increase after a stabilization of atmospheric greenhouse gases and radiative forcing in the year 2100 are identified. The additional warming by the year 3000 is 0.6-1.6 K for the low-CO2 IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) B1 scenario and 1.3-2.2 K for the high-CO2 SRES A2 scenario. Correspondingly, the post-2100 thermal expansion commitment is 0.3-1.1 m for SRES B1 and 0.5-2.2 m for SRES A2. Sea level continues to rise due to thermal expansion for several centuries after CO2 stabilization. In contrast, surface temperature changes slow down after a century. The meridional overturning circulation is weakened in all EMICs, but recovers to nearly initial values in all but one of the models after centuries for the scenarios considered. Emissions during the twenty-first century continue to impact atmospheric CO2 and climate even at year 3000. All models find that most of the anthropogenic carbon emissions are eventually taken up by the ocean (49%-62%) in year 3000, and that a substantial fraction (15%-28%) is still airborne even 900 yr after carbon emissions have ceased. Future stabilization of atmospheric CO2 and climate change requires a substantial reduction of CO2 emissions below present levels in all EMICs. This reduction needs to be substantially larger if carbon cycle-climate feedbacks are accounted for or if terrestrial CO2 fertilization is not operating. Large differences among EMICs are identified in both the response to increasing atmospheric CO2 and the response to climate change. This highlights the need for improved representations of carbon cycle processes in these models apart from the sensitivity to climate change. Sensitivity simulations with one single EMIC indicate that both carbon cycle and climate sensitivity related uncertainties on projected allowable emissions are substantial. [less ▲]

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See detailLong-term cold therapy to treat knee osteoarthritis: proof-of-concept.
Henrotin, Yves ULiege

in Hospital Health Care (2009)

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See detailLong-term consistency of spatial patterns of primate seed dispersal
Heymann, E. W.; Culot, Laurence ULiege; Knogge, Christoph et al

in Ecology and Evolution (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (2 ULiège)
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See detailThe long-term cytoskeletal rearrangement induced by rabbit enteropathogenic Escherichia coli is Esp-dependent but intimin-independent
Nougayrède, J. P.; Marchès, O.; Boury, M. et al

in Molecular Microbiology (1999), 31

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See detailLong-term denosuamab treatment in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis : results from the first two years of the FREEDOM trial extension
Bone, H.; Chapurlat, R.; Brandi, M. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2011), 22(S4), 527-528

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (1 ULiège)