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See detailProduction of sulfur from gypsum as an industrial by-product.
Hiligsmann, Serge ULg; Taillieu, X.; Deswaef, S. et al

Poster (1995, May)

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See detailProduction of sulfur from gypsum as an industrial byproduct
Hiligsmann, Serge ULg; Deswaef, Sophie; Taillieu, Xavier et al

in Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology (1996), 57-8

Biological sulfate reduction was investigated at the bench and pilot scales in order to determine optimum culture conditions. Efficient strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were selected by ... [more ▼]

Biological sulfate reduction was investigated at the bench and pilot scales in order to determine optimum culture conditions. Efficient strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were selected by classical microbiological methods and by mutagenesis. Improvement factors, including stripping, scale-up, sulfate,and organic substrate concentrations, have been studied in batch bioreactors. Two types of pilot-scale bioreactors have been adopted, the first being completely mixed with free cells and the second having two stages with immobilized cells on a fixed bed. An overall bioconversion capacity of 11 kg/m(3) . d of gypsum and 1.2 kg/m(3) . d of dissolved organic carbon has been achieved in the two-stage bioreactor. [less ▲]

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See detailProduction of sulfuric acid and installation therefor
Arpentinier, Philippe; Dumont, Marie-Noëlle ULg; Kalitventzeff, Boris ULg

Patent (2000)

In the production of sulfuric acid by (a) oxidizing a sulfurous material with an oxidant to obtain sulfur dioxide, (b) catalytically oxidizing this with oxygen to obtain sulfur trioxide and (c) producing ... [more ▼]

In the production of sulfuric acid by (a) oxidizing a sulfurous material with an oxidant to obtain sulfur dioxide, (b) catalytically oxidizing this with oxygen to obtain sulfur trioxide and (c) producing sulfuric acid and a waste gas, at least part of the waste gas is recycled to the first step. The fabrication of sulfuric acid consists of: (a) producing sulfur dioxide from a sulfur based material and an oxidant; (b) converting catalytically the sulfur dioxide into trioxide in a catalytic converter fed with oxygen; and (c) producing sulfuric acid from the sulfur trioxide. In the last step, some other gases are also produced which are (partially) recycled into the oxidant used in step (a). An Independent claim is also included for apparatus for performing the process. The apparatus for H2SO4 production consists of: (a) production unit (10') of SO2 from a sulfurous raw material and an oxidant; (b) catalytic converter (20') of SO2 equipped with means of feeding O2; and (c) preparation unit (30') of H2SO4 from SO3 It comprises also means for recycling waste gases at the outlet of the preparation unit (30') of H2SO4 towards the SO2 production unit (10'). [less ▲]

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See detailProduction of surface-active agents and antioxidants from renewable resources under microwave heating
Richel, Aurore ULg

Conference (2012, November)

The non-energetic valorization of renewable resources using efficient and eco-friendly methodologies is the central axis of the “green chemistry” concept. In particular, the chemical conversion of ... [more ▼]

The non-energetic valorization of renewable resources using efficient and eco-friendly methodologies is the central axis of the “green chemistry” concept. In particular, the chemical conversion of carbohydrates arising from the hydrolysis of non-edible vegetable feedstock (i.e., lignocellulosic biomass and streams) is a widely explored thematic for the production of new high-added value materials. In this context, we report here on the development of a microwave heating methodology for the efficient production of carbohydrate-based and lignin-based chemicals with relevant antioxidant and surface-active properties. New effective synthetic protocols minimizing wastes and energy-consumption are proposed. Enhanced yields and selectivities are achieved after a few minutes of microwave heating using heterogeneous catalysts. The benefits of this microwave approach are highlighted in terms of yields, atom efficiency, environmental factor, and carbon efficiency. Up-scaling assays are also discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailProduction of surfactin and fengycin by Bacillus subtilis in a bubbleless membrane bioreactor.
Coutte, Francois; Lecouturier, Didier; Yahia, Saliha Ait et al

in Applied microbiology and biotechnology (2010), 87(2), 499-507

Surfactin and fengycin are lipopeptide biosurfactants produced by Bacillus subtilis. This work describes for the first time the use of bubbleless bioreactors for the production of these lipopeptides by B ... [more ▼]

Surfactin and fengycin are lipopeptide biosurfactants produced by Bacillus subtilis. This work describes for the first time the use of bubbleless bioreactors for the production of these lipopeptides by B. subtilis ATCC 21332 with aeration by a hollow fiber membrane air-liquid contactor to prevent foam formation. Three different configurations were tested: external aeration module made from either polyethersulfone (reactor BB1) or polypropylene (reactor BB2) and a submerged module in polypropylene (reactor BB3). Bacterial growth, glucose consumption, lipopeptide production, and oxygen uptake rate were monitored during the culture in the bioreactors. For all the tested membranes, the bioreactors were of satisfactory bacterial growth and lipopeptide production. In the three configurations, surfactin production related to the culture volume was in the same range: 242, 230, and 188 mg l(-1) for BB1, BB2, and BB3, respectively. Interestingly, high differences were observed for fengycin production: 47 mg l(-1) for BB1, 207 mg l(-1) for BB2, and 393 mg l(-1) for BB3. A significant proportion of surfactin was adsorbed on the membranes and reduced the volumetric oxygen mass transfer coefficient. The degree of adsorption depended on both the material and the structure of the membrane and was higher with the submerged polypropylene membrane. [less ▲]

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See detailProduction of three anti-listerial peptides by Lactobacillus curvatus in MRS broth.
Ghalfi, H.; Benkerroum, N.; Ongena, Marc ULg et al

in Food Research International (2010), (43), 33-39

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See detailThe Production of Titan's Ultraviolet Nitrogen Airglow
Stevens, Michael H.; Gustin, Jacques ULg; Ajello, J. M. et al

in AAS/Division for Planetary Sciences Meeting Abstracts #42 (2010, October 01)

The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed Titan's dayside limb on 22 June, 2009, obtaining high quality extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and far ultraviolet (FUV) spectra from a distance of ... [more ▼]

The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed Titan's dayside limb on 22 June, 2009, obtaining high quality extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and far ultraviolet (FUV) spectra from a distance of only 60,000 km (23 Titan radii). The observations reveal the same EUV and FUV emissions arising from photoelectron excitation and photofragmentation of molecular nitrogen (N[SUB]2[/SUB]) on Earth but with the altitude of peak emission much higher on Titan near 1000 km altitude. In the EUV, emission bands from the photoelectron excited N[SUB]2[/SUB] Carroll-Yoshino c[SUB]4[/SUB]'-X system and N I and N II multiplets arising from photofragmentation of N[SUB]2[/SUB] dominate, with no detectable c[SUB]4[/SUB]'(0,0) emission near 958 Å, contrary to many interpretations of the lower resolution Voyager 1 Ultraviolet Spectrometer data. The FUV is dominated by emission bands from the N[SUB]2[/SUB] Lyman-Birge-Hopfield a-X system and additional N I multiplets. We also identify several N[SUB]2[/SUB] Vegard-Kaplan A-X bands between 1500-1900 Å, two of which are located near 1561 and 1657 Å where C I multiplets were previously identified from a separate UVIS disk observation. We compare these limb emissions to predictions from a terrestrial airglow model adapted to Titan that uses a solar spectrum appropriate for these June, 2009 observations. Volume production rates and limb radiances are calculated, including extinction by methane and allowance for multiple scattering within the readily excited c[SUB]4[/SUB]'(0,v') system, and compared to UVIS observations. We find that for these airglow data only emissions arising from processes involving N[SUB]2[/SUB] are present. [less ▲]

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See detailThe production of Titan's ultraviolet nitrogen airglow
Stevens, Michael H; Gustin, Jacques ULg; Ajello, Joseph M et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2011), 116

The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed Titan's dayside limb in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and far ultraviolet (FUV) on 22 June 2009 from a mean distance of 23 Titan radii. These ... [more ▼]

The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed Titan's dayside limb in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and far ultraviolet (FUV) on 22 June 2009 from a mean distance of 23 Titan radii. These high-quality observations reveal the same EUV and FUV emissions arising from photoelectron excitation and photofragmentation of molecular nitrogen (N[SUB]2[/SUB]) as found on Earth. We investigate both of these solar driven processes with a terrestrial airglow model adapted to Titan and find that total predicted radiances for the two brightest N[SUB]2[/SUB] band systems agree with the observed peak radiances to within 5%. Using N[SUB]2[/SUB] densities constrained from in situ observations by the Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer on Cassini, the altitude of the observed limb peak of the EUV and FUV emission bands is between 840 and 1060 km and generally consistent with model predictions. We find no evidence for carbon emissions in Titan's FUV airglow in contrast to previous Titan airglow studies using UVIS data. In their place, we identify several vibrational bands from the N[SUB]2[/SUB] Vegard-Kaplan system arising from photoelectron impact with predicted peak radiances in agreement with observations. These Titan UV airglow observations are therefore comprised of emissions arising only from solar processes on N[SUB]2[/SUB] with no detectable magnetospheric contribution. Weaker EUV Carroll-Yoshino N[SUB]2[/SUB] bands within the v′ = 3, 4, and 6 progressions between 870 and 1020 Å are underpredicted by about a factor of five while the (0,1) band near 980 Å is overpredicted by about a factor of three. [less ▲]

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See detailProduction of tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-gamma and interleukin-2 by peripheral blood mononuclear cells of subjects suffering from rheumatoid arthritis
Franchimont, P.; Reuter, A.; Vrindts-Gevaert, Y. et al

in Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology (1988), 17(3), 203-212

Using radio-immunoassay methods, the production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) released by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC ... [more ▼]

Using radio-immunoassay methods, the production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) released by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), maintained in culture and stimulated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA), was measured in normal subjects and patients with active or inactive rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Results indicated a dissociation between mitogenic response and secretion of mediators by PBMC under the influence of PHA in both normal controls and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). While [3H]thymidine incorporation was characterized by a rather bell-shaped curve with increasing concentrations of PHA, IL-2 and TNF-alpha displayed a linear dose-dependent increase. [3H]thymidine uptake by PBMC was in the same range in normal subjects as in patients with active and inactive RA, although cytokine secretion differed. The PBMC of patients with active RA produced less TNF-alpha, IL-2, and IFN-gamma than did those of the controls. In cases of inactive RA, the secretory response varied from subject to subject; mean values did not differ from those of normal subjects, except for those of IL-2 (p less than 0.01). The significance and the clinical relevance of these findings are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailPRODUCTION OF XANTHAN GUM FROM XANTHOMONAS CAMPESTRIS NRRL B-1459 BY FERMENTATION OF DATE JUICE PALM BY-PRODUCTS (PHOENIX DACTYLIFERA L.)
Ben Salah, Riadh; Chaari, Kacem; Besbes, Souhail et al

in Journal of Food Process Engineering (2011), 34(2), 457-474

In this work, we studied the possibility to use date juice for xanthan gum production by Xanthomonas campestris NRRL B-1459. The results showed that this strain has a high ability to metabolize date juice ... [more ▼]

In this work, we studied the possibility to use date juice for xanthan gum production by Xanthomonas campestris NRRL B-1459. The results showed that this strain has a high ability to metabolize date juice. The data on optimization of physiological conditions of fermentation, pH, temperature, inoculum's size, glucose and nitrogen concentration showed that the maximum xanthan yield of 24.5 g/L was obtained from 60 g/L glucose, 3 g/L ammonium sulphate when batch fermentation was carried with 5% inoculum's size at pH 7, 28C, 48 h, on a rotary orbital shaker at 180 rpm. The polysaccharide purified by high performance liquid chromatography and analyzed by thin layer chromatography contained glucose, glucoronic acid and mannose. PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS Agri-food by-products rich in sugars may be used to produce high added value food ingredients such as xanthan gum. No work has studied the production of this polysaccharide from date. This study is focused on given value addition to date by-product (hard texture) by production of xanthan gum. The effect of several parameters (pH, temperature, inoculum's size, agitation speed, nitrogen source and carbon concentration) on production yield was investigated. [less ▲]

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See detailProduction of ß-galactosidase from a thermotolerant yeast strain.
Thonart, Philippe ULg; Baijot, B.; Crahay, V.

Poster (1984, September)

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See detailProduction of γ-Decalactone by a Psychrophilic and a Mesophilic Strain of the Yeast
Alchihab, Mohamed ULg; Destain, Jacqueline ULg; Aguedo, Mario ULg et al

in Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology (2009), 158

Among 18 psychrophilic strains isolated near the Antarctic Station, the psychrophilic <br />strain Rhodotorula aurantiaca A19 was selected for its ability of growth and γ- <br />decalactone production at ... [more ▼]

Among 18 psychrophilic strains isolated near the Antarctic Station, the psychrophilic <br />strain Rhodotorula aurantiaca A19 was selected for its ability of growth and γ- <br />decalactone production at low temperatures. The effects of temperature, initial pH, and castor <br />oil concentration on the growth and γ-decalactone production by a psychrophilic and a <br />mesophilic strain of R. aurantiaca were investigated. The highest γ-decalactone production <br />in flasks (5.8 g/l) was obtained with the strain A19 at 14 °C and initial pH 7.0 in medium <br />containing 20 g/l castor oil. On the other hand, these factors did not affect the production of <br />γ-decalactone by the mesophilic strain. In fermentor, a γ-decalactone concentration of 6.6 g/l <br />was reached with the strain A19, whereas a maximum of 0.1 g/l was obtained with the <br />mesophilic strain. Our results suggest that the ability to synthesize γ-decalactone is a <br />particularity of the strain A19, since the mesophilic strain (no. 30645) produced small amounts, <br />and the other (no. 31354) did not exhibit this property. It is, to our knowledge, the first report of γ-decalactone production by R. aurantiaca and furthermore by a psychrophilic yeast strain. <br />Moreover, the amount of γ-decalactone obtained in fermentor with the strain 19 was on the <br />order of concentrations usually described in patents. [less ▲]

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See detailProduction of γ-decalactoned by the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica using different ricinoleic acid sources: comparison of different start-up strategies
Gomes, N.; Aguedo, Mario ULg; Teixeira, J.A. et al

in CONGRESSO NACIONAL MICRO'07 BIOTEC'07-XXXIII JPG (2007, November)

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See detailLa production photosynthétique d'oxygène
Franck, Fabrice ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2010)

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See detailProduction Planning in Automated Manufacturing
Crama, Yves ULg; Oerlemans, Alwin; Spieksma, Frits

Book published by Springer-Verlag - première édition (1994)

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See detailProduction planning problems in printed circuit board assembly
Crama, Yves ULg; van de Klundert, Joris; Spieksma, Frits CR

in Discrete Applied Mathematics (2002), 123(1-3), 339-361

This survey describes some of the main optimization problems arising in the context of production planning for the assembly of printed circuit boards. The discussion is structured around a hierarchical ... [more ▼]

This survey describes some of the main optimization problems arising in the context of production planning for the assembly of printed circuit boards. The discussion is structured around a hierarchical decomposition of the planning process into distinct optimization subproblems, addressing issues such as the assignment of board types to machine groups, the allocation of component feeders to individual machines, the determination of optimal production sequences, etc, The paper reviews the literature on this topic with an emphasis on the most recent developments, on the fundamental structure of the mathematical models and on the relation between these models and some 'environmental' variables such as the layout of the shop or the product mix. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V, All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailProduction porcine et environnement
Debouche, Charles ULg

Scientific conference (2001, September 19)

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See detailProduction potentielle de bioéthanol, de biométhane et de pellets à partir des déchets de biomasse lignocellulosique du bananier (Musa spp.) au Cameroun
Kamdem, Irenée ULg; Tomekpe, Kodjo; Thonart, Philippe ULg

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2011), 15(3), 471-483

Like most African countries who are producers and exporters of banana, Cameroon is facing a major energy deficit. Yet, the country is generating annually about 4,500,000 tons of fresh banana plant ... [more ▼]

Like most African countries who are producers and exporters of banana, Cameroon is facing a major energy deficit. Yet, the country is generating annually about 4,500,000 tons of fresh banana plant lignocellulosic waste biomass matter equivalent to 402,750 tons of dry matter. The dry matter contained about 80,57% organic matter which are not exploited. Under the sustainable development, which is linked to environmental protection, the biotransformation of these residues can potentially produce about 93,800; 92,133; 447,500 tons of bioethanol, biomethane and pellets respectively. The waste transformation could reduce the energy deficit and create jobs opportunities. Productions of this renewable energy or biofuel also constitute a new area which could assure an important source of income for the banana cultivators and the entire country. [less ▲]

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