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See detailNeural correlates of hypokinetic gait in Parkinson’s disease: An fMRI study
Cremers, Julien ULg; Stamatakis, Julien; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg et al

Poster (2012)

Objective: To investigate the neural correlates of hypokinetic gait in Parkinson’s disease (PD) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Background: Although hypokinetic gait is frequent and ... [more ▼]

Objective: To investigate the neural correlates of hypokinetic gait in Parkinson’s disease (PD) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Background: Although hypokinetic gait is frequent and has a negative impact on quality of life in PD, its underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Assuming that the brain regions recruited during real and imagined gait strongly overlap, mental imagery of brisk gait may be a successful approach to study hypokinetic gait in PD. Methods: Fifteen ‘‘on-drugs’’ PD patients (8 males; mean age 5 65.1 6 9.4 years) and fifteen controls matched for age, gender and mental imagery skills were trained to perform video-taped trials of comfortable and brisk gait on a 25 meter-path. The study was organ- ized as a block-design fMRI experiment where subjects were instructed to rehearse themselves performing comfortable and brisk gait and to press a key to indicate when they completed each 25 meter-imagined gait trial. The imagined speed reserve (ISR) defined as the difference between imagined brisk and comfortable gait speeds was measured as a control of behavioral performance. Imaging data processing and analyses were performed using SPM8. The first-level individual contrast images representing the comparison between brisk and comfortable gait were entered as two separate groups (controls vs patients) in an ANOVA with the corresponding ISRs as correlation regressors. Results: Compared with controls, patients showed hypokinetic gait during real gait training as their increase in speed during brisk relatively to comfortable gait was related to an increase in step ca- dence (r50.87; p<0.001) but not in step length (r50.11). ISRs meas- ured during fMRI and their real counterparts measured offline strongly correlated in patients (r50.88; p<0.001) and controls (r50.59; p50.02). Between-group comparison (p<0.001, uncorrected) of fMRI data showed that increasing imagined gait speed was strongly associated with increased activity of the left posterior parietal cortex in controls and with decreased activity of this region in patients. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that hypokinetic gait in PD is related to the impaired functioning of the left posterior parietal cortex. This area may represent a target for therapeutic interventions aimed at alleviating gait disturbances in PD. [less ▲]

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See detailThe neural correlates of implicit and explicit sequence learning : Interacting networks revealed by the process dissociation procedure
Destrebecqz, Arnaud; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in Learning & Memory (Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.) (2005), 12(5), 480-490

In two (H15O)-O-2 PET scan experiments, we investigated the cerebral correlates of explicit and implicit knowledge in a serial reaction time (SRT) task. To do so, we used a novel application of the ... [more ▼]

In two (H15O)-O-2 PET scan experiments, we investigated the cerebral correlates of explicit and implicit knowledge in a serial reaction time (SRT) task. To do so, we used a novel application of the Process Dissociation Procedure, a behavioral paradigm that makes it possible to separately assess conscious and unconscious contributions to performance during a subsequent sequence generation task. To manipulate the extent to which the repeating sequential pattern was learned explicitly, we varied the pace of the choice reaction time task-a variable that is known to have differential effects on the extent to which sensitivity to sequence structure involves implicit or explicit knowledge. Results showed that activity in the striatum subtends the implicit component of performance during recollection of a learned sequence, whereas the anterior cingulate/mesial prefrontal cortex (ACC/MPFC) supports the explicit component. Most importantly, we found that the ACC/MPFC exerts control on the activity of the striatum during retrieval of the sequence after explicit learning, whereas the activity of these regions is uncoupled when learning had been essentially implicit. These data suggest that implicit learning processes can be successfully controlled by conscious knowledge when learning is essentially explicit. They also supply further evidence for a partial dissociation between the neural substrates supporting conscious and nonconscious components of performance during recollection of a learned sequence. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural Correlates of Ongoing Conscious Experience: Both Task-Unrelatedness and Stimulus-Independence Are Related to Default Network Activity
Stawarczyk, David ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg; Maquet, Pierre ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2011), 6(2), 16997

The default mode network (DMN) is a set of brain regions that consistently shows higher activity at rest compared to tasks requiring sustained focused attention toward externally presented stimuli. The ... [more ▼]

The default mode network (DMN) is a set of brain regions that consistently shows higher activity at rest compared to tasks requiring sustained focused attention toward externally presented stimuli. The cognitive processes that the DMN possibly underlies remain a matter of debate. It has alternately been proposed that DMN activity reflects unfocused attention toward external stimuli or the occurrence of internally generated thoughts. The present study aimed at clarifying this issue by investigating the neural correlates of the various kinds of conscious experiences that can occur during task performance. Four classes of conscious experiences (i.e., being fully focused on the task, distractions by irrelevant sensations/perceptions, interfering thoughts related to the appraisal of the task, and mind-wandering) that varied along two dimensions (“task-relatedness” and “stimulus-dependency”) were sampled using thought-probes while the participants performed a go/no-go task. Analyses performed on the intervals preceding each probe according to the reported subjective experience revealed that both dimensions are relevant to explain activity in several regions of the DMN, namely the medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus, and posterior inferior parietal lobe. Notably, an additive effect of the two dimensions was demonstrated for midline DMN regions. On the other hand, lateral temporal regions (also part of the DMN) were specifically related to stimulus-independent reports. These results suggest that midline DMN regions underlie cognitive processes that are active during both internal thoughts and external unfocused attention. They also strengthen the view that the DMN can be fractionated into different subcomponents and reveal the necessity to consider both the stimulus-dependent and the task-related dimensions of conscious experiences when studying the possible functional roles of the DMN. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural Correlates of Performance Variabilty during Motor Sequence Acquisition
Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Sterpenich, V.; Vandewalle, Gilles ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2012), 60(1), 324-331

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See detailNeural correlates of personal goal processing during episodic future thinking and mind-wandering: an ALE meta-analysis
Stawarczyk, David ULg; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg

in Human Brain Mapping (2015), 36(8), 2928-2947

The ability to imagine the future is a complex mental faculty that depends on an ensemble of cognitive processes supported by an extended set of brain regions. Our aim here was to shed light on one key ... [more ▼]

The ability to imagine the future is a complex mental faculty that depends on an ensemble of cognitive processes supported by an extended set of brain regions. Our aim here was to shed light on one key component of future thinking—personal goal processing—and to determine its neural correlates during both directed and spontaneous forms of thoughts. To address this question, we performed separate ALE meta-analyses of neuroimaging studies of episodic future thinking, mind-wandering, and personal goal processing, and then investigated the commonalities and differences in brain activity between these three domains. The results showed that the three domains activated a common set of brain regions within the default network and, most notably, the medial prefrontal cortex. This finding suggests that the medial prefrontal cortex mediates the processing of personal goals during both episodic future thinking and mind-wandering. Differences in activation were also observed, and notably regions supporting cognitive control processes (the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) were recruited to a lesser extent during mind-wandering than experimentally directed future thinking, suggesting that different kinds of self-generated thoughts may recruit varying levels of attentional control abilities. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural correlates of personal goal processing when envisioning future events
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg

Conference (2009, December 10)

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See detailThe Neural Correlates of Re-cancellation Behaviors in Unilateral Neglect: A Neuropsychological Approach
Wansard, Murielle ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; Meulemans, Thierry ULg

Poster (2014, April)

The present study focused on re-cancellation behaviors in unilateral neglect (i.e., the tendency to search repeatedly items located on the right side in visual search tasks), and used a neuropsychological ... [more ▼]

The present study focused on re-cancellation behaviors in unilateral neglect (i.e., the tendency to search repeatedly items located on the right side in visual search tasks), and used a neuropsychological approach to identify the cerebral correlates of this deficit. Fourteen patients suffering from left neglect and 14 elderly age-matched controls performed a cancellation task without visual feedback. Neglect patients cancelled fewer targets than controls, and re-cancelled an abnormally high number of targets. Lesion maps were used to compare the location of brain damage in neglect patients with the highest versus the lowest percentage of re-cancellations. Anatomical data revealed that the right insula is commonly damaged in 5 out of 6 patients with the highest re-cancellation percentage, but is spared in the subgroup of patients with the lowest re-cancellation percentage. These results suggest that damage to the right insula may contribute to pathological visual search in spatial neglect, possibly by reducing interaction between the ventral and dorsal attention network (the latter being more directly involved in spatial processes). [less ▲]

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See detailThe neural correlates of recollection and familiarity during aging
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

in Journal of Psychophysiology (2013), 27(Suppl 1), 48

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See detailThe neural correlates of recollection and familiarity during aging
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailThe neural correlates of recollection and familiarity during aging
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

in Proceedings of the XII Colloque International sur le Vieillissement Cognitif (2012)

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See detailThe neural correlates of recollection and familiarity during aging
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (3 ULg)
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See detailThe neural correlates of recollection and familiarity during aging
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

Poster (2012, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (7 ULg)
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See detailNeural correlates of sleep spindles as revealed by simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI)
Schabus, M.; Dang-Vu, T.; Balteau, Evelyne ULg et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2006, September), 15(Suppl. 1), 50-51

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (1 ULg)
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See detailNeural correlates of tDCS & repeated stimulations
Thibaut, Aurore ULg

Scientific conference (2015, July 05)

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See detailNeural correlates of tic generation in Tourette syndrome: an event-related functional MRI study.
Bohlhalter, Stephan; Goldfine, Andrew; Matteson, S. et al

in Brain : A Journal of Neurology (2006), 129(Pt 8), 2029-37

Little is known about the neural correlates of tics and associated urges. In the present study, we aimed to explore the neural basis of tics in patients with Tourette syndrome by using event-related ... [more ▼]

Little is known about the neural correlates of tics and associated urges. In the present study, we aimed to explore the neural basis of tics in patients with Tourette syndrome by using event-related functional MRI (fMRI). Ten patients (6 women, 4 men; age: mean +/- SD = 31 +/- 11.2) were studied while spontaneously exhibiting a variety of motor and vocal tics. On the basis of synchronized video/audio recordings, fMRI activities were analysed 2 s before and at tic onset irrespective of the clinical phenomenology. We identified a brain network of paralimbic areas such as anterior cingulate and insular cortex, supplementary motor area (SMA) and parietal operculum (PO) predominantly activated before tic onset (P < 0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons). In contrast, at the beginning of tic action, significant fMRI activities were found in sensorimotor areas including superior parietal lobule bilaterally and cerebellum. The results of this study indicate that paralimbic and sensory association areas are critically implicated in tic generation, similar to movements triggered internally by unpleasant sensations, as has been shown for pain or itching. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (1 ULg)