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See detailMurmurs of thought: phenomenology of hallucinatory consciousness in impending psychosis
Raballo, A.; Laroi, Frank ULg

in Psychosis: Psychological, Social and Integrative Approaches (2011), 3

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See detailMurray Bail's Eucalyptus: An Australian Fairy-Tale?
Herbillon, Marie ULg

Scientific conference (2008)

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See detailMurray Bail's Eucalyptus: An Australian Fairy-Tale?
Herbillon, Marie ULg

in Collier, Gordon; Davis, Geoff; Delrez, Marc (Eds.) et al The Invention of Legacy: Essays in Memory of Hena Maes-Jelinek (2016)

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See detailMurs et barbelés. Lectures croisées de Wendy Brown et Olivier Razac
Oulc'hen, Hervé ULg

Scientific conference (2010, February 23)

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See detailMurs, Frontières et Liberté(s) de Circulation
Gemenne, François ULg

Book published by Fayard (in press)

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See detailLe murus gallicus de Pont-de-Bonne (Modave, province de Liège). Campagne de fouilles 2005-2006
Delye, Emmanuel ULg

in Lunula Archaeologia Protohistorica (2007), XV

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See detailLe murus gallicus de Pont-de-Bonne. Campagnes de fouilles 2005-2006
Delye, Emmanuel ULg

in Bulletin de l'Association scientifique liégeoise pour la recherche archéologique (2008), 26

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See detailThe Mus musculus Mx1 gene confers strong protection against highly pathogenic influenzavirus A H5N1
Garigliany, Mutien-Marie ULg; Lambrecht, Bénédicte; Leroy, Michaël et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailMusaespora kalbii (lichenized Ascomycetes: Melanommatales), a new foliicolous lichen with a pantropical distribution
Lücking, Robert; Sérusiaux, Emmanuël ULg

in Nordic Journal of Botany (1997), 16

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See detailLe muscardin (Muscardinus avellanarius)
Libois, Roland ULg

Learning material (1994)

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See detailMuscarinic receptor subtypes in canine trachea.
Brichant, Jean-François ULg; Warner, David O; Gunst, Susan J et al

in American Journal of Physiology (1990), 258(6 Pt 1), 349-54

Prejunctional and postjunctional muscarinic receptor subtypes were characterized in canine trachealis muscle strips. In vitro contractile responses of muscle strips to acetylcholine or electric field ... [more ▼]

Prejunctional and postjunctional muscarinic receptor subtypes were characterized in canine trachealis muscle strips. In vitro contractile responses of muscle strips to acetylcholine or electric field stimulation were determined in the absence and the presence of gallamine, pirenzepine, and 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide (4-DAMP). Gallamine had no effect on the contractile response to acetylcholine but enhanced the contractile response to electric field stimulation. Pirenzepine and 4-DAMP reduced the contractile response to acetylcholine and electric field stimulation. The pA2 value for pirenzepine vs. acetylcholine [7.18 +/- 0.59 (SD)] was consistent with the affinity of pirenzepine for M2 or M3-receptors; whereas the pA2 value for 4-DAMP vs. acetylcholine (8.92 +/- 0.42) and the extremely low affinity of gallamine indicated postjunctional muscarinic receptors of the M3 subtype. The enhancement of the contractile response to electric field stimulation by gallamine suggested the presence of M2-prejunctional receptors. [less ▲]

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See detailMuscle activation after ACL reconstruction: influence of the resistance pad position
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Forthomme, Bénédicte ULg; Baudoin, Hervé et al

in Isokinetics & Exercise Science (2005, March), 13(1), 16-17

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See detailMuscle Characteristics, Meat Tenderness and Nutritional Qualities Traits of Borgou, Lagunaire and Zebu Fulani Bulls Raised on Natural Pasture in Benin
Salifou, C.F.A.; Dahouda, Mahamadou; Houaga, I et al

in International Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances (2013), 5(4), 143-155

This study was carried out to evaluate muscle characteristics, meat ten derness and nutritional qualities of Benin indigenous cattle raised on natural pasture. Thus, 10 Zebu Fulani, 10 Borgou and 5 ... [more ▼]

This study was carried out to evaluate muscle characteristics, meat ten derness and nutritional qualities of Benin indigenous cattle raised on natural pasture. Thus, 10 Zebu Fulani, 10 Borgou and 5 Lagunaire were slaughtered at 5 years old and their Longissimus thoracis muscle samples were collected for analyses. Lactate dehydrogenase activity of Zebu Fulani was higher (p<0.05) than that of Lagunaire (3494 vs 2813 μmol/min/g protein) while that of Borgou was not significantly different from those of the two other breeds (p>0.05). As for isocitrate dehydrogenase, citrate synthase, cytochrome oxidase and phosphofructokinase, no significant difference was observed between the three breeds (p>0.05). By contrast, the total collagen content of Borgou (5.2 mg OH-proline/mg dry matter) was higher (p<0.01) than those of Zebu Fulani (3.1 mg OH-proline/mg dry matter) and Lagunaire (3.2 mg OH-proline/mg dry matter). The myosin heavy chain isoforms I, IIa and IIx were not different between the three breeds. The dry matter, the crude protein and the ether extract percentage were not significantly varied from one breed to another. Branched-chain Fatty Acids and saturated fatty acids contents were identical in Lagunaire and Borgou (p>0.05) while the Zebu Fulani had the highest values (p<0.05). The ratio n-6 to n-3 fatty acids obtained in the Zebu was the lower. In general, according to the fatty acids profile, Borgou and Lagunaire bulls’ meat is better than that of Zebu for heart disease [less ▲]

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See detailMuscle damage and delayed muscular soreness induced by eccentric isokinetic exercise
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Camus, Gérard; Deby-Dupont, C. et al

in Pflügers Archiv : European Journal of Physiology (1995), 429

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See detailMuscle damage induced by concentric fatigue protocol. Comparative study between males and females
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Maquet, Didier ULg; Camus, Gérard et al

in Proceedings of the 5th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science (2000, July)

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See detailMuscle energetics in exercising horses
Votion, Dominique ULg; Navet, Rachel ULg; Lacombe, A. et al

in Equine & Comparative Exercise Physiology (2007), 4

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See detailMuscle energetics in fibromyalgia patients explored by magnetic resonance imaging and 31P-spectroscopy
Maquet, Didier ULg; Vanderthommen, Marc ULg; Demoulin, Christophe ULg et al

in Pederson, John-A. (Ed.) New Research in Fibromyalgia (2006)

Objectives: The aim of this study was to use magnetic resonance imaging and 31P spectroscopy in order to explore muscle metabolism during exercise in fibromyalgia patients. Methods: Eight women with ... [more ▼]

Objectives: The aim of this study was to use magnetic resonance imaging and 31P spectroscopy in order to explore muscle metabolism during exercise in fibromyalgia patients. Methods: Eight women with fibromyalgia (FM) and 30 healthy volunteers were included in this study. Magnetic resonance imaging of the dominant leg was acquired in order to determine the maximal transverse section (MTS) of calf muscles and thus to calculate the different loads of exercise (dynamic plantar flexions). Subjects performed 3-6 bouts of 2 minutes with workload increments until exhaustion. Spectra were acquired continuously at rest, during the exercise and recovery periods. The analysis concerned the -, - and - ATP, Pi, PCr peaks, and intracellular pH. At the end of the exercise, a muscular efficacy index and the PCr re-phosphorylation time constant were calculated. Results: The MTS of the ankle plantar flexors reached respectively 43  7 cm² and 36.7  5 cm² in control and FM groups (p > 0.05). No significant difference (p > 0.05) was observed between both groups in spectroscopic data registered at rest [10.7 (control) vs 9.1 (FM) for PCr/Pirest ; 7.01 (control) vs 6.99 (FM) for pHrest] and at the end of exercise [1.18 (control) vs 0.68 (FM) for PCr/Piend ; 6.89 (control) vs 6.81 (FM) for pHend]. The muscular efficacy index was significantly reduced in FM patients (1.25) in comparison with control group (2.46) (p < 0.05). The PCr time constant was not different between control subjects (27.7 s) and FM patients (25.6 s) (p > 0.05). Conclusions: This study did not indicate any abnormalities in glycolytic and oxydative pathways in FM patients. We demonstrated a low efficiency of chemical to mechanical energy shift in FM patients. These results suggested a deconditioning syndrome without primitive muscular abnormalities in FM patients and displayed the importance of aerobic muscular rehabilitation. [less ▲]

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See detailMuscle fatigue experienced during maximal eccentric exercise is predictive of the plasma creatine kinase (CK) response
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Rogister, Bernard ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Meeusen, R.; Duchateau, J.; Roelands, B. (Eds.) et al Book of Abstracts of the 17th annual Congress of the ECSS (2012, July)

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See detailMuscle fatigue experienced during maximal eccentric exercise is predictive of the plasma creatine kinase (CK) response
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Rogister, Bernard ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports (2013), 23(4), 501-7

Unaccustomed eccentric exercise may cause skeletal muscle damage with an increase in plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity. Although the wide variability among individuals in CK response to standardized ... [more ▼]

Unaccustomed eccentric exercise may cause skeletal muscle damage with an increase in plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity. Although the wide variability among individuals in CK response to standardized lengthening contractions has been well described, the reasons underlying this phenomenon have not yet been understood. Therefore, this study investigated a possible correlation of the changes in muscle damage indirect markers after an eccentric exercise with the decline in muscle performance during the exercise. Twenty-seven healthy untrained male subjects performed three sets of 30 maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions of the knee extensors. The muscular work was recorded using an isokinetic dynamometer to assess muscle fatigue by means of various fatigue indices. Plasma CK activity, muscle soreness, and stiffness were measured before (pre) and one day after (post) exercise. The eccentric exercise bout induced significant changes of the three muscle damage indirect markers. Large intersubject variability was observed for all criteria measured. More interestingly, the log (CKpost/CKpre) and muscle stiffness appeared to be closely correlated with the relative work decrease (r = 0.84, r2 = 0.70 and r = 0.75, r2 = 0.56, respectively). This is the first study to propose that the muscle fatigue profile during maximal eccentric protocol could predict the magnitude of the symptoms associated with muscle damage in humans. [less ▲]

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