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See detailMolecular recognition force spectroscopy
Willet, Nicolas ULg; Lamprecht, Constanze; Rankl, Christian et al

in Duwez, Anne-Sophie; Willet, Nicolas (Eds.) Molecular manipulation with atomic force microscopy (2011)

This chapter describes the state of the art in molecular recognition force spectroscopy performed by AFM. The different aspects of the topic are discussed, as the appropriate techniques for the ... [more ▼]

This chapter describes the state of the art in molecular recognition force spectroscopy performed by AFM. The different aspects of the topic are discussed, as the appropriate techniques for the functionalization of cantilever tips and for the preparation of (biological) samples. The principles of single-molecule force spectroscopy are then explained, together with exciting and recent examples on synthetic and biological samples. Finally, the main techniques to map molecular recognition interactions are reviewed and discussed in terms of performances. Novel and interesting applications illustrate the use of these imaging methods. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular requirements for ethanol differential allosteric modulation of glycine receptors based on selective Gbetagamma modulation.
Yevenes, Gonzalo E; Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Avila, Ariel et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2010), 285(39), 30203-13

It is now believed that the allosteric modulation produced by ethanol in glycine receptors (GlyRs) depends on alcohol binding to discrete sites within the protein structure. Thus, the differential ethanol ... [more ▼]

It is now believed that the allosteric modulation produced by ethanol in glycine receptors (GlyRs) depends on alcohol binding to discrete sites within the protein structure. Thus, the differential ethanol sensitivity of diverse GlyR isoforms and mutants was explained by the presence of specific residues in putative alcohol pockets. Here, we demonstrate that ethanol sensitivity in two ligand-gated ion receptor members, the GlyR adult alpha(1) and embryonic alpha(2) subunits, can be modified through selective mutations that rescued or impaired Gbetagamma modulation. Even though both isoforms were able to physically interact with Gbetagamma, only the alpha(1) GlyR was functionally modulated by Gbetagamma and pharmacological ethanol concentrations. Remarkably, the simultaneous switching of two transmembrane and a single extracellular residue in alpha(2) GlyRs was enough to generate GlyRs modulated by Gbetagamma and low ethanol concentrations. Interestingly, although we found that these TM residues were different to those in the alcohol binding site, the extracellular residue was recently implicated in conformational changes important to generate a pre-open-activated state that precedes ion channel gating. Thus, these results support the idea that the differential ethanol sensitivity of these two GlyR isoforms rests on conformational changes in transmembrane and extracellular residues within the ion channel structure rather than in differences in alcohol binding pockets. Our results describe the molecular basis for the differential ethanol sensitivity of two ligand-gated ion receptor members based on selective Gbetagamma modulation and provide a new mechanistic framework for allosteric modulations of abuse drugs. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular sexing of Ursidae: application on extant and extinct brown bears
Pagès, Marie ULg; Maudet, Célia; Bellemain, Eva et al

Poster (2005, September)

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See detailMolecular size and symmetry of Pseudomonas aeruginosa catabolic ornithine carbamoyltransferase. An X-ray crystallography analysis.
Marcq, S.; Diaz-Ruano, A.; Charlier, Paulette ULg et al

in Journal of Molecular Biology (1991), 220(1), 9-12

The catabolic ornithine carbamoyltransferase (EC 2.1.3.3) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, that shows allosteric behaviour, and a mutant version of this enzyme has been crystallized in several different ... [more ▼]

The catabolic ornithine carbamoyltransferase (EC 2.1.3.3) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, that shows allosteric behaviour, and a mutant version of this enzyme has been crystallized in several different crystal forms. All of these have been characterized by X-ray diffraction methods. A 4.5 A resolution data set has been collected on a triclinic crystal. Analysis of the data using the self-rotation function shows that 12 monomers associate to form a particle with cubic 23 point group symmetry. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular Spectra in Cosmic Sources
Swings, Polydore ULg

in Hynek, Joseph Allen (Ed.) Astrophysics; a topical symposium commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the Yerkes Observatory and a half century of progress in astrophysics (1951)

Brief Introduction to Molecular Spectroscopy Identification of Molecules in Spectra Excitation and Ionization Phenomena in Molecular Spectra Suggested Astronomical Observations of Importance Suggested ... [more ▼]

Brief Introduction to Molecular Spectroscopy Identification of Molecules in Spectra Excitation and Ionization Phenomena in Molecular Spectra Suggested Astronomical Observations of Importance Suggested Laboratory and Theoretical Investigations Suggestions for Desirable Theoretical Astrophysical Investigations General Conclusion [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular Structure and Surface Order in Monolayers of Alkanethiols Evidenced by HREELS
Duwez, Anne-Sophie ULg; Yu, L.M.; Riga, J. et al

Conference (1997, August 24)

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See detailMolecular Structure and Surface Order in Monolayers of Alkanethiols Evidenced by HREELS
Duwez, Anne-Sophie ULg; Yu, Li-Ming; Riga, Joseph et al

in Thin Solid Films (1998), 327-329

Structural characteristics and order within n-alkanethiols, a,q-alkanedithiols and a-cycloalkyl-q-alkanethiols monolayers self-assembled on gold have been investigated using high resolution electron ... [more ▼]

Structural characteristics and order within n-alkanethiols, a,q-alkanedithiols and a-cycloalkyl-q-alkanethiols monolayers self-assembled on gold have been investigated using high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). The coherent domain sizes have been estimated from the angular distribution of the elastic peak as a function of the nature of the alkane chain and of the immersion time in the thiol solutions. These data have revealed many defects in the organization of the monolayers on evaporated gold substrates. It has been shown that the domains are smaller on Au(100) than on Au(111). [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular Structures of Penicillin-Binding Proteins and Beta-Lactamases
Ghuysen, Jean-Marie ULg

in Trends in Microbiology (1994), 2(10), 372-380

In the past, new antibacterial agents have been selected either from natural sources or by 'trial and error' modification of existing antibacterials. Future therapeutic strategies are likely to depend on ... [more ▼]

In the past, new antibacterial agents have been selected either from natural sources or by 'trial and error' modification of existing antibacterials. Future therapeutic strategies are likely to depend on increased knowledge of existing drug targets and the search for new targets. The machinery for the assembly of bacterial-cell-wall peptidoglycan is an ideal place to look. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular Systematics of Rattini in South East Asia
Pagès, Marie ULg

Conference (2008, October)

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See detailMolecular targeting of antiangiogenic factor 16K hPRL inhibits oxygen-induced retinopathy in mice
Pan, H.; Nguyen, Ngoc-Quynh-Nhu ULg; Yoshida, H. et al

in Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science (2004), 45(7), 2413-2419

PURPOSE. To examine the ability and mechanism of the 16 kDa N-terminal fragment of human prolactin (16K hPRL) in the inhibition of abnormal retinal neovascularization. METHODS. The 16K hPRL-encoding ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE. To examine the ability and mechanism of the 16 kDa N-terminal fragment of human prolactin (16K hPRL) in the inhibition of abnormal retinal neovascularization. METHODS. The 16K hPRL-encoding sequence was inserted into an adenoviral vector (16K-Ad). Western blot analysis verified the expression of 16K hPRL and inhibition of proliferation, confirming functional activity of the 16K hPRL in virus-infected adult bovine aortic endothelial (ABAE) cells. 16K hPRL inhibited retinal neovascularization in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy. The ability of recombinant 16K hPRL expressed in E. coli (r16K hPRL) was compared to that of endostatin in inducing apoptosis of cultured human retinal endothelial cells (HREC). RESULTS. 16K was expressed in virus-infected ABAE cells and resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. Eyes injected with 16K-Ad showed a reduction in preretinal neovascularization of 82.3 +/- 9.3% (P < 0.00001) when compared to uninjected controls. r16K hPRL was 100 times more potent than endostatin in inducing apoptosis in HRECs. CONCLUSIONS. Intravitreal administration of 16K hPRL inhibited neovascularization in the mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy. 16K hPRL stimulated apoptosis in HRECs and inhibited cell proliferation in ABAE cells. These results suggested a potential therapeutic role for 16K hPRL in the treatment of proliferative retinopathies. [less ▲]

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