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See detailPromenade céleste
Nazé, Yaël ULg

Article for general public (2007)

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See detailLa promenade comme acte esthétique
Szanto, Catherine ULg

in Les Cahiers de la recherche architecturale et urbaine (2012), 26 / 27

La promenade – l’une des multiples manières de marcher – est une attitude de marche particulière, où le promeneur se rend disponible aux sollicitations des qualités spatiales polysensorielles des lieux ... [more ▼]

La promenade – l’une des multiples manières de marcher – est une attitude de marche particulière, où le promeneur se rend disponible aux sollicitations des qualités spatiales polysensorielles des lieux qu’il traverse. Mêlant perception et imagination, la promenade est un « acte de construction de sens », requérant la « compétence de situation » du promeneur. [less ▲]

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See detailPromenade liégeoise dans l'Eighteenth Century Short Title Catalogue
Droixhe, Daniel ULg

in Bulletin de la Société Royale Le Vieux-Liège (1990), 250

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See detailUne promesse difficile à tenir
Rubbers, Benjamin ULg

Article for general public (2006)

Article sur la situation des victimes de l'Opération Départ Volontaire au Katanga, RDC.

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See detailPromesses du politique. Aux fondements de l’agir responsable
Nachi, Mohamed ULg

in Ben Achour, Yadh (Ed.) Droits et culture. Mélanges en l’honneur du Doyen Yadh Ben Achour (2008)

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See detailPromesses et écueils de la collaboration Nord/Sud dans la recherche d'agents biologiquement actifs d'origine végétale
Angenot, Luc ULg

in Ansay, Michel; Thill, G. (Eds.) Pesticides et médicaments en santé Animale (1990)

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See detailA prominent role for amygdaloid complexes in the Variability in Heart Rate (VHR) during Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep relative to wakefulness.
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2006), 32(3), 1008-1015

Rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) is associated with intense neuronal activity, rapid eye movements, muscular atonia and dreaming. Another important feature in REMS is the instability in autonomic ... [more ▼]

Rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) is associated with intense neuronal activity, rapid eye movements, muscular atonia and dreaming. Another important feature in REMS is the instability in autonomic, especially in cardiovascular regulation. The neural mechanisms underpinning the variability in heart rate (VHR) during REMS are not known in detail, especially in humans. During wakefulness, the right insula has frequently been reported as involved in cardiovascular regulation but this might not be the case during REMS. We aimed at characterizing the neural correlates of VHR during REMS as compared to wakefulness and to slow wave sleep (SWS), the other main component of human sleep, in normal young adults, based on the statistical analysis of a set of (H2O)-O-15 positron emission tomography (PET) sleep data acquired during SWS, REMS and wakefulness. The results showed that VHR correlated more tightly during REMS than during wakefulness with the rCBF in the right amygdaloid complex. Moreover, we assessed whether functional relationships between amygdala and any brain area changed depending the state of vigilance. Only the activity within in the insula was found to covary with the amygdala, significantly more tightly during wakefulness than during REMS in relation to the VHR. The functional connectivity between the amygdala and the insular cortex, two brain areas involved in cardiovascular regulation, differs significantly in REMS as compared to wakefulness. This suggests a functional reorganization of central cardiovascular regulation during REMS. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailA Prominent Role for Amygdaloïd Complexes in the Variability of Heart Rate during Rapid Eye Movement (REM) Sleep
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Dang Vu, Thanh; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2005), 26(Suppl. 1),

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See detailThe promise of wearable activity sensors to define patient recovery.
Appelboom, Geoff; Yang, Annie H.; Christophe, Brandon R. et al

in Journal of clinical neuroscience : official journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia (2014), 21

The recent emergence of mobile health - the use of mobile telecommunication and wireless devices to improve health outcomes, services, and research - has inspired a patient-centric approach to monitor ... [more ▼]

The recent emergence of mobile health - the use of mobile telecommunication and wireless devices to improve health outcomes, services, and research - has inspired a patient-centric approach to monitor health metrics. Sensors embedded in wearable devices are utilized to acquire greater self-knowledge by tracking basic parameters such as blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature as well as data related to exercise, diet, and psychological state. To that end, recent studies on utilizing wireless fitness activity trackers to monitor and promote functional recovery in patients suggest that collecting up-to-date performance data could help patients regain functional independence and help hospitals determine the appropriate length of stay for a patient. This manuscript examines existing functional assessment scales, discusses the use of activity tracking sensors in evaluating functional independence, and explores the growing application of wireless technology in measuring and promoting functional recovery. [less ▲]

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See detailPromising New Agents in Osteoporosis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Henrotin, Yves ULg; Gosset, Christiane ULg

in Drugs in R&D (1999), 1(3), 195-201

Currently marketed inhibitors of bone resorption or stimulators of bone formation have significantly contributed to a better preventive and therapeutic approach to postmenopausal and senile osteoporosis ... [more ▼]

Currently marketed inhibitors of bone resorption or stimulators of bone formation have significantly contributed to a better preventive and therapeutic approach to postmenopausal and senile osteoporosis. However, none of the available compounds has unequivocally demonstrated an ability to fully prevent the occurrence of new vertebral or peripheral osteoporotic fractures once the disease is established. Therefore, several new medications are being developed, with the aim of providing a better risk-benefit profile and/or a more favourable cost-utility assessment than available drugs. Potential inhibitors of bone resorption include specific inhibitors of the osteoclast's proton pump, inhibitors of prostaglandins or nitric oxide donors. Stimulators of osteoblastic activity and subsequent bone formation might be obtained by strontium salts, peptides of the parathyroid hormone family, growth hormone and insulin-like growth factors or bone morphogenetic proteins. Most of these compounds are now undergoing phase II/III development programmes, and results evaluating their potential benefit should be available within 1 to 5 years. [less ▲]

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See detailA Promising Perspective for Pathologies Diagnosis by MALDI In-Source Decay Imaging with a FTMS System.
Calligaris, David ULg; Debois, Delphine ULg; Turtoi, Andrei ULg et al

Poster (2012, May 23)

Introduction MALDI imaging mass spectrometry has proven to be effective for the discovery and the monitoring of disease-related proteins. With this technique a molecular diagnosis could be done directly ... [more ▼]

Introduction MALDI imaging mass spectrometry has proven to be effective for the discovery and the monitoring of disease-related proteins. With this technique a molecular diagnosis could be done directly on tissue sections in the environment of the diseased area. The use of in-source decay (ISD), that does allow fast and reliable sequences assignments of proteins termini, is a crucial tool for the identification of known biomarkers during MALDI imaging experiments. Combined with ultra-high mass resolution and high mass measurement accuracy of Fourier transform ion-cyclotron (FTICR) mass spectrometry, it is possible to unambiguously assign sequences of proteins present in tissue slices. In this study, we have shown that FTICR mass spectrometry could be a powerful tool to diagnose pathologies by MALDI-ISD imaging. Methods All measurements were carried out on a SolariX FTMS (9.4 tesla) equipped with a Dual Source including smartbeamTMII laser which includes a robust solid state 1 kHz laser with advanced optics for molecular imaging (Bruker Daltonics). Lysozyme (14.3-kDa) or Human Serum Albumin (66.3-kDa) solution (1 mg/ml in 0.1 % TFA) was mixed with 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (DAN) and analyzed by MALDI-ISD and MALDI-ISD imaging. Mouse brain and rabbit eye tissue slices were washed (fixed) to obtain optimal sensitivity and high-quality ion. Before DAN application with an ImagePrep (Bruker Daltonics) and MALDI-ISD imaging analyzes, spots of myelin and crystalline were deposited near mouse brain or rabbit eye tissues, respectively. Results were interpreted using BioToolsTM 3.2 in combination with MascotTM (Matrix Science) for ISD spectra and FlexImagingTM 2.1 for MALDI-ISD imaging experiments. α Preliminary data The studies were carried out by MALDI-ISD and MALDI-ISD imaging analyses to evidence the interest on FTICR mass spectrometer for proteins identification in the field of biomarkers characterization. It is demonstrated that protein ISD leads to the same pattern of fragmentation observed during MALDI-TOF analyzes. Fragmentation generates cn- and zn-series ions of lysozyme and HSA in presence of DAN. Supplementary an-, bn-, xn- and yn-series ions can also be observed. The internal calibration of all the data provides a mass accuracy neighboring 2.5 ppm over the m/z range of interest (300-2500 Da) and a mass resolution of 70000 at m/z 400 Da. It allows the assignment of ISD fragments of proteins, in the low mass range (m/z between 300 and 900), whether from pure solutions or included in tissue slices. Moreover, spots of pure proteins solution (myelin or crystalline) near tissue slices allows to unambiguously validate the proteins identification during MALDI ISD imaging experiments. Novel aspect This study evidences the main input of FTICR mass spectrometer for pathologies diagnosis based on biomarkers localization and identification by MALDI-ISD imaging. [less ▲]

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See detailPromoter analysis of the three HMA4 copies in the zinc hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri
Nouet, Cécile ULg; Cebula, Justyna; Motte, Patrick ULg et al

Poster (2011, August)

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See detailPromoter analysis of three HMA4 gene copies in the zinc hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri
Nouet, Cécile ULg; Cebula, Justyna; Motte, Patrick ULg et al

Poster (2012, September 20)

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See detailPromoter characterization of the mouse melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1
Lakaye, Bernard ULg; Adamantidis, Antoine ULg; Coumans, Bernard ULg et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta-Gene Structure and Expression (2004), 1678(1), 1-6

The gene encoding the mouse melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 was isolated and its structural organization and flanking regions were characterized. The 3' flanking region is marked by the presence ... [more ▼]

The gene encoding the mouse melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 was isolated and its structural organization and flanking regions were characterized. The 3' flanking region is marked by the presence of two polyadenylation signals but used with different frequencies. RNase protection and 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) identified multiple transcription initiation sites between -150 and -203 bp upstream of the ATG initiation codon. Functional analysis of deletion mutants reveals a cell independent transcriptional activity localized between nucleotide -305 and -589. The proximal 1.5 kb region does not possess consensus TATA or CAAT boxes but has several consensus sequences for regulatory elements including USF, GATA, AP1, AP4, MyoD, GKLF and Ikaros that could explain the broad expression of the receptor. [less ▲]

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See detailA promoter element active in run-off transcription controls the expression of two cistrons of nad and rps genes in Nicotiana sylvestris mitochondria
Lelandais, C.; Gutierres, S.; Mathieu, C. et al

in Nucleic Acids Research (1996), 24(23), 4798-4804

The expression of two mitochondrial gene clusters (orf87-nad3-nad1/A and orf87-nad3-rps 12) was studied in Nicotiana sylvestris. 5' and 3' termini of transcripts were mapped by primer extension and ... [more ▼]

The expression of two mitochondrial gene clusters (orf87-nad3-nad1/A and orf87-nad3-rps 12) was studied in Nicotiana sylvestris. 5' and 3' termini of transcripts were mapped by primer extension and nuclease S1 protection. Processing and transcription initiation sites were differentiated by in vitro phosphorylation and capping experiments. A transcription initiation site, present in both gene clusters, was found 213 nucleotides upstream of orf87. This promoter element matches the consensus motif for dicotyledonous mitochondrial promoters and initiates run-off transcription in a pea mitochondrial purified protein fraction, Processing sites were identified 5' of nad3, nad1/A and rps12 respectively. These results suggest that (i) the expression of the two cistrons is only controlled by one duplicated promoter element, and (ii) multiple processing events are required to produce monocistronic nad3, nad1/A and rps12 transcripts. [less ▲]

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See detailPromoter swapping between the genes for a novel zinc finger protein and beta-catenin in pleiomorphic adenomas with t(3;8)(p21;q12) translocations.
Kas, K.; Voz, Marianne ULg; Roijer, E. et al

in Nature Genetics (1997), 15(2), 170-4

Pleiomorphic adenoma of the salivary glands is a benign epithelial tumour occurring primarily in the major and minor salivary glands. It is by far the most common type of salivary gland tumour ... [more ▼]

Pleiomorphic adenoma of the salivary glands is a benign epithelial tumour occurring primarily in the major and minor salivary glands. It is by far the most common type of salivary gland tumour. Microscopically, pleiomorphic adenomas show a marked histological diversity with epithelial, myoepithelial and mesenchymal components in a variety of patterns. In addition to a cytogenetic subgroup with normal karyotypes, pleiomorphic adenomas are characterized by recurrent chromosome rearrangements, particularly reciprocal translocations, with breakpoints at 8q12, 3p21, and 12q13-15, in that order of frequency. The most common abnormality is a reciprocal t(3;8)(p21;q12). We here demonstrate that the t(3;8)(p21;q12) results in promoter swapping between PLAG1, a novel, developmentally regulated zinc finger gene at 8q12, and the constitutively expressed gene for beta-catenin (CTNNB1), a protein interface functioning in the WG/WNT signalling pathway and specification of cell fate during embryogenesis. Fusions occur in the 5'-non-coding regions of both genes, exchanging regulatory control elements while preserving the coding sequences. Due to the t(3;8)(p21;q12), PLAG1 is activated and expression levels of CTNNB1 are reduced. Activation of PLAG1 was also observed in an adenoma with a variant translocation t(8;15)(q12;q14). Our results indicate that PLAG1 activation due to promoter swapping is a crucial event in salivary gland tumourigenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailPromoter-dependent effect of IKK alpha on NF-kappa B/p65 DNA binding
Gloire, Geoffrey ULg; Horion, Julie; El Mjiyad, Nadia ULg et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2007), 282(29), 21308-21318

IKK alpha regulates many chromatin events in the nuclear phase of the NF-kappa B program, including phosphorylation of histone H3 and removal of co-repressors from NF-kappa B-dependent promoters. However ... [more ▼]

IKK alpha regulates many chromatin events in the nuclear phase of the NF-kappa B program, including phosphorylation of histone H3 and removal of co-repressors from NF-kappa B-dependent promoters. However, all of the nuclear functions of IKK alpha are not understood. In this study, using mouse embryonic fibroblasts IKK alpha knock-out and reexpressing IKK alpha after retroviral transduction, we demonstrate that IKK alpha contributes to NF-kappa B/p65 DNA binding activity on an exogenous kappa B element and on some, but not all, endogenous NF-kappa B-target promoters. Indeed, p65 chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that IKK alpha is crucial for p65 binding on kappa B sites of icam-1 and mcp-1 promoters but not on i kappa b alpha promoter. The mutation of IKK alpha putative nuclear localization sequence, which prevents its nuclear translocation, or of crucial serines in the IKK alpha activation loop completely inhibits p65 binding on icam-1 and mcp-1 promoters and rather enhances p65 binding on the i kappa b alpha promoter. Further molecular studies demonstrated that the removal of chromatin-bound HDAC3, a histone deacetylase inhibiting p65 DNA binding, is differentially regulated by IKK alpha in a promoter-specific manner. Indeed, whereas the absence of IKK alpha induces HDAC3 recruitment and repression on the icam-1 promoter, it has an opposite effect on the i kappa b alpha promoter, where a better p65 binding occurs. We conclude that nuclear IKK alpha is required for p65 DNA binding in a gene-specific manner. [less ▲]

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