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See detailPrevention of bacterial biofilms by covalent immobilization of peptides onto plasma polymer functionalized substrates
Vreuls, Christelle ULg; Zocchi, Germaine ULg; Thierry, Benjamin et al

in Journal of Materials Chemistry (2010), 20

In this study, robust antibacterial coatings were created on stainless steel through the covalent grafting of antibacterial peptides onto an organic-polymeric interlayer deposited by RF-glow discharge ... [more ▼]

In this study, robust antibacterial coatings were created on stainless steel through the covalent grafting of antibacterial peptides onto an organic-polymeric interlayer deposited by RF-glow discharge plasma. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize and optimize the two steps of the coating process. The biocidal activity of these surfaces was demonstrated against both Gram+ and Gram- bacteria using ISO tests. 3 to 6 log10 reductions of both Gram+ and Gram- bacterial strains were obtained compared to uncoated stainless steel and depending on the particular antibacterial peptide immobilized. Importantly the antibacterial surfaces were resistant to several cleaning conditions. The latter is significant as the stability of such antibacterial surfaces in close to real life conditions is a major concern and leaching, de-lamination, rearrangement and ageing of the coating can lead to insufficient long term biofilm resistance of the surface. [less ▲]

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See detailPrevention of bacterial biofilms onto stainless steel substrates by immobilization of antimicrobial and anti-biofilm biomolecules
Vreuls, Christelle ULg; Zocchi, Germaine ULg; Faure, Emilie ULg et al

Conference (2011)

Stainless steel is widely used in the daily life in building and food industries as well as in the medical field. However, at long term, bacteria succeed in adhering, proliferating and forming a resistant ... [more ▼]

Stainless steel is widely used in the daily life in building and food industries as well as in the medical field. However, at long term, bacteria succeed in adhering, proliferating and forming a resistant biofilm on stainless steel. Therefore, surface modification is needed providing metal surface with antibacterial, anti-adhesion and easy cleaning properties. Several biomolecules (antimicrobial peptides, antiadhesion biomolecules and anti-biofilm enzymes) were immobilized on stainless steel thanks to different immobilization techniques. In a first approach, cationic peptides have been embedded in a LBL architecture comprising anti-adhesion biomolecules. In a second approach, small inorganic-binding peptides isolated by phage display technology and recognizing specifically the steel surface were used as linker for antimicrobial peptide immobilization. Finally, antibacterial peptides were covalently grafted onto an organic-polymeric interlayer deposited by plasma. Resulting antibacterial, antiadhesion and anti-biofilm properties were characterized and the advantages of each immobilization technique were documented. The biocidal effect of these surfaces was demonstrated against Gram+/- bacteria. Coated stainless steel surfaces led to 95% reduction of S. epidermidis adhesion vs bare substrate. By combining both antibacterial and anti-adhesion biomolecules, we produced stainless steel surfaces with better cleanability. A biofilm-releasing glycoside hydrolase was also immobilized on the surface and showed to confer anti-biofilm properties to stainless steel. Moreover, we provide valuable insight about the resistance of the coating to close to real life cleaning conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailPrevention of cardiovascular disease: plea for a rationale use of diet and lipid-lowering drugs.
Scheen, André ULg

in Acta Clinica Belgica (2003), 58(3), 149-51

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See detailprevention of delirium in perioperatie cares in old persons
Petermans, Jean ULg

Conference (2012, November 10)

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See detailPrevention of early postmenopausal bone loss by intranasal calcitonin - a controlled, randomised study lasting one year in normal women
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Denis, D; Albert, Adelin ULg et al

in Gynecological Endocrinology : The Official Journal of the International Society of Gynecological Endocrinology (1988), 2

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See detailPrevention of early postmenopausal bone loss by strontium ranelate : a randomised, two-year, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; DEROISY, Rita ULg; Tsouderos, Y et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (2001), 16(S1), 219

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See detailPrevention of early postmenopausal bone loss by strontium ranelate: The randomized, two-year, double-masked, dose-ranging, placebo-controlled PREVOS trial
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Deroisy, Rita ULg; Dougados, M. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2002), 13(12), 925-931

Early postmenopausal women (n = 160) were randomised to receive placebo or strontium ranelate (SR) 125 mg/day, 500 mg/day or 1 g/day for 2 years (40 participants per group). All participants received ... [more ▼]

Early postmenopausal women (n = 160) were randomised to receive placebo or strontium ranelate (SR) 125 mg/day, 500 mg/day or 1 g/day for 2 years (40 participants per group). All participants received calcium 500 mg/day. The primary efficacy parameter was the percent variation in lumbar bone mineral density (BMD), measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Secondary efficacy criteria included hip BMD and biochemical markers of bone turnover. At month 24, SR I g/day significantly increased lumbar BMD compared with placebo [mean (SD) +5.53% (5.12); p < 0.001] for measured values and [mean (SD) + 1.41% (5.33%); p < 0.05] for values adjusted for bone strontium content. The annual increase for adjusted values was +0.66% compared with -0.5% with placebo, with an overall beneficial effect after 2 years of about 2.4% with SR I g/day relative to placebo. There were no other significant between-group differences in adjusted lumbar BMD. Femoral neck and total hip BMD were also significantly increased at month 24 with SR I g/day compared with placebo [mean (SD): +2.46% (4.78) and +3.21% (4.68), respectively; both p < 0.001)]. SR 1 g/day significantly increased bone alkaline phosphatase at all time points (p < 0.05) compared with baseline and between-group analysis showed a significant increase, compared with placebo, at month 18 (p = 0.048). No effect on markers of bone resorption was observed. SR was as well tolerated as placebo. The minimum does at which SR is effective in preventing bone loss in early postmenopausal non-osteoporotic women is therefore 1 g/day. [less ▲]

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See detailPrevention of early postmenopausal bone loss with oral tiludronate
Roux, C; DEROISY, Rita ULg; Basse-Cathalinat, B et al

in Osteoporosis International (1996), 6(S1), 249

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See detailPrevention of falls, bone loss and fractures : D-hormone analogs or native vitamin D? a meta-perspective
Richy, Florent; Dukas, L.; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2009, March), 20(Suppl.1), 90

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See detailPrevention of GBS perinatal infections: guidelines and update
Melin, Pierrette ULg

Conference (2007, September 27)

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See detailPrevention of group B streptococcal neonatal disease revisited. The DEVANI European project
Rodriguez-Granger, J.; Alvargonzales, J. C.; Berardi, A. et al

in European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases : Official Publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology (2012)

The purpose of this paper was to present the current knowledge on the prevention of group B streptococcus (GBS)neonatal infections and the status of prevention policies in European countries and to ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this paper was to present the current knowledge on the prevention of group B streptococcus (GBS)neonatal infections and the status of prevention policies in European countries and to present the DEVANI pan-European program, launched in 2008. The aim of this program was to assess the GBS neonatal infection burden in Europe, to design a new vaccine to immunize neonates against GBS infections, to improve the laboratory performance for the diagnosis of GBS colonization and infection, and to improve the methods for the typing of GBS strains. The current guidelines for GBS prevention in different countries were ascertained and a picture of the burden before and after the instauration of prevention policies has been drawn. After the issue of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines, many European countries have adopted universal screening for the GBS colonization of pregnant women and intrapartum prophylaxis to colonized mothers. Nevertheless, some European countries continue advocating the risk factor approach to GBS prevention. Most European countries have implemented policies to prevent GBS neonatal infections and the burden of the disease has decreased during the last several years. Nevertheless, further steps are necessary in order to develop new strategies of prevention, to improve microbiological techniques to detect GBS colonization and infection, and to coordinate the prevention policies in the EU. [less ▲]

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See detailPrevention of hamstring injuries in football players
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg

in Congress book of Brucosport – 23rd Congress of Sports Medicine of the AZ Sint-Jan AV (2004, October 15)

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See detailPrevention of hip fractures in osteoporosis
Neuprez, Audrey ULg; Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Minerva Ortopedica e Traumatologica (2007), 58(5), 423-437

Hip fracture is the major clinical consequence of osteoporosis. It is linked with decreased life expectancy and quality of life, placing an ever increasing burden on health services. Few medications have ... [more ▼]

Hip fracture is the major clinical consequence of osteoporosis. It is linked with decreased life expectancy and quality of life, placing an ever increasing burden on health services. Few medications have unequivocally demonstrated their ability to reduce hip fracture risk in osteoporotic subjects. Daily alendronate and risedronate reduce hip fracture in patients with low bone mineral density and prevalent vertebral fractures. Intravenous bisphosphonates have been developed, in response to long-term poor adherence to oral anti-osteoporotic treatments. Once-yearly zoledronic acid reduces fracture rates at the spine, non-spine and hip locations. Strontium ranelate, the first drug to uncouple bone formation from bone resorption has also demonstrated its ability to reduce hip fractures in patients above 74 years old, with prevalent low bone mineral density. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation are prerequisite for the management of elderly subjects and should always been associated to anti-resorptive or bone forming agents. Non-pharmacological management of osteoporosis is recommended cannot be considered a substitute for pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis, not even in old age. [less ▲]

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See detailPrevention of human errors
Nyssen, Anne-Sophie ULg

Conference (2003, September)

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See detailPrevention of human errors in the frame of the activity theory
Nyssen, Anne-Sophie ULg; De Keyser, Véronique ULg

in Anderson, N.; Sinangil, H.; Viswesvaran, C. (Eds.) et al International handbook of work and organizational psychology. Vol. 1 (2001)

In this chapter, we will discuss error prevention tools in the frame of the Russian Activity theory, concentrating on three tools : error reporting systems, training simulators and operator aids.

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See detailPREVENTION OF INCISIONAL HERNIA AFTER MIDLINE LAPAROTOMY FOR ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM TREATMENT: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Muysoms, F; Vierendeels, T; Huyghe, M et al

Conference (2014, September 11)

Background: The incidence of incisional hernias (IH) after open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair is high. Prophylactic mesh augmentation (PMA) during laparotomy closure has been proposed in high ... [more ▼]

Background: The incidence of incisional hernias (IH) after open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair is high. Prophylactic mesh augmentation (PMA) during laparotomy closure has been proposed in high-risk patients. Methods: A multicenter prospective randomized controlled study was conducted on patients undergoing elective repair of AAA through midline laparotomy (Clinical.Trials.gov: NCT00757133). In the study group a retro-muscular PMA was performed with a large-pore polypropylene mesh (Ultrapro™, width 7.5 cm). The primary endpoint was the incidence of IH at 24 months. Results: Between February 2009 and January 2013, 120 patients were recruited at 8 Belgian centers. Patients' characteristics at baseline were similar between the groups. Operative and postoperative characteristics showed no difference in morbidity or mortality. A highly significant reduction of IH incidence was found after PMA compared to conventional closure, respectively 0% (CI: 0 % - 5.5%) versus 27.6% (CI: 16.7% - 40.9%) (P<0.0001; Fisher's exact test). The estimated "freedom of IH" curves (Kaplan-Meier estimate) were significantly different across study arms (X2=18.93, P<0.0001; Mantel-Cox test). No adverse effects were observed, apart from an increased mean (SD) time to close the abdominal wall for PMA: 46.2 min (18.6) versus 29.6 min (18.5) (P<0.001; Mann-Whitney U test). Conclusion: Prophylactic retro-muscular mesh augmentation of a midline laparotomy in AAA patients is safe and effectively prevents the development of IH, with an extra time investment of 17 minutes. [less ▲]

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See detailPrevention of low back injuries in sports
Vanderthommen, Marc ULg

in Isokinetics & Exercise Science (2008), 16(3), 171

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See detailPrevention of malnutrition in older people during and after hospitalisation: results from a randomised controlled clinical trial
Gazzotti, C.; Arnaud-Battandier, F.; Parello, M. et al

in Age & Ageing (2003), 32(3), 321-325

Objective: to prevent the occurrence of weight loss during hospitalisation and following discharge by daily oral supplementation. Design: in a prospective, randomised, controlled study of 80 patients aged ... [more ▼]

Objective: to prevent the occurrence of weight loss during hospitalisation and following discharge by daily oral supplementation. Design: in a prospective, randomised, controlled study of 80 patients aged 75 or more, and at risk of undernutrition based on their initial Mini Nutritional Assessment score, patients were randomised into a control group or one receiving oral supplementation. The intervention was a prescription of 200 ml sweet or salty sip feed twice daily (500 kcal, 21 g protein per day) throughout hospitalisation and convalescence. Nutritional status was assessed at baseline and after 2 months using Mini Nutritional Assessment and body weight record. Results: compliance with oral supplementation was good and daily extra energy intake was 407+/-184 kcal. On day 60, significant weight loss from upon admission was observed in the control group (-1.23+/-2.5 kg; P=0.01), but not in the supplemented group (0.28+/-3.8 kg; NS). At the end of the study, Mini Nutritional Assessment scores were higher in the supplemented group than in the control group (23.5+/-3.9 versus 20.8+/-3.6; P<0.01). Conclusion: use of daily oral supplementation during and after hospitalisation maintains body weight and increases Mini Nutritional Assessment score in patients at risk of undernutrition. [less ▲]

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See detailPrevention of metabolic alterations by insulin supplements administered either before or after 2-h nocturnal interruption of CSII.
Scheen, André ULg; Henrivaux, P.; Jandrain, Bernard ULg et al

in Diabetes Care (1987), 10(5), 567-72

To evaluate the efficacy of a bolus insulin injection to prevent the metabolic alterations induced by a 2-h nocturnal interruption of a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), nine type I ... [more ▼]

To evaluate the efficacy of a bolus insulin injection to prevent the metabolic alterations induced by a 2-h nocturnal interruption of a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), nine type I (insulin-dependent) C-peptide-negative diabetic patients were studied from 2200 to 0800 h during two randomized tests. An insulin bolus (2.1 +/- 0.2 U) was administered via the pump either at 2300 h, just before CSII interruption, or at 0100 h, after reactivating the pump at its usual basal rate (1.05 +/- 0.11 U/h). The insulin bolus at 2300 h induced a significant rise in plasma free-insulin levels at 2400 h (+6.9 +/- 1.8 mU/L, P less than .01), resulting in an early and marked fall in blood glucose concentrations between 2300 and 0100 h (-2.7 +/- 0.5 mM, P less than .001), with hypoglycemic values in five patients. The insulin bolus at 0100 h counteracted the fall in plasma free-insulin levels observed between 2300 and 0100 h and significantly increased plasma insulin at 0200 h (+3.2 +/- 0.8 mU/L, P less than .01). Blood glucose concentrations that remained stable during the 2-h arrest of the pump fell significantly between 0100 and 0400 h (-2.1 +/- 0.5 mM, P less than .005). This fall rate was significantly lower than that measured within the 3 h after the insulin bolus given before CSII interruption but significantly higher than that observed in a reference control group of patients whose pump was functioning normally throughout the night.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) [less ▲]

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