Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA randomized, open-label, multicenter study evaluating the efficacy of peginterferon alfa-2a versus interferon alfa-2a, in combination with ribavirin, in naïve and relapsed chronic hepatitis C patients.
Nevens, F.; Van Vlierberghe, H.; D'Heygere, F. et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2010), 73

Background/Aims : A large multicenter trial to compare the efficacy of peginterferon alfa-2a with interferon alfa-2a, in combination with ribavirin, in chronic hepatitis C patients. Efficacy data for ... [more ▼]

Background/Aims : A large multicenter trial to compare the efficacy of peginterferon alfa-2a with interferon alfa-2a, in combination with ribavirin, in chronic hepatitis C patients. Efficacy data for prior relapsers are reported because treatment recommendations for this patient population are not well defined. Patients and methods : This study was a multicenter, prospective, randomized clinical trial. The primary efficacy endpoint was sustained virologic response in naïve patients (n = 348) and relapsers (n = 95). Results : Sustained virologic response rates were similar in naïve patients and relapsers, both for non-pegylated and pegylated interferon (respectively 27 and 26% and 54 and 43%). Pegylated interferon given for 48 weeks did not improved the relapse rate : 15.9 and 27.3% for non-pegylated and 16.7 and 30.4% for pegylated interferon, naïve vs relapsers respectively. Stepwise logistic regression analysis revealed a significant association between slow response (detectable HCV RNA at week 12 and undetectable at week 24) and relapse in patients with an end-of-treatment response (55% versus 13% respectively ; p = 0.02 ; odds ratio = 6.07). Conclusions : This trial confirms the value of using peginter - feron alfa-2a in both naïve and relapsed patients and provides support for a more tailored approach to treatment for relapsers and particulary for patients with a slow viral response. (Acta gastro enterol. belg., 2010, 73, 223-228). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA randomized, placebo-controlled study of the effects of denosumab for the treatment of men with low bone mineral density
Orwoll, E.; Teglbjærg, C. S.; Langdahl, B. L. et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (2012), 97(9), 3161-3169

Context: Men with low bone mineral density (BMD) were treated with denosumab. Objective: Our objective was to investigate the effects of denosumab compared with placebo in men with low BMD after 1 yr of ... [more ▼]

Context: Men with low bone mineral density (BMD) were treated with denosumab. Objective: Our objective was to investigate the effects of denosumab compared with placebo in men with low BMD after 1 yr of treatment. Design, Subjects, and Intervention: This was a placebo-controlled, phase 3 study to investigate the efficacy and safety of denosumab 60 mg every 6 months vs. placebo in men with low BMD. Main Outcome Measure: The primary endpoint was the percent change from baseline in lumbar spine (LS) BMD at month 12. Results: Of the 242 randomized subjects (mean age 65 yr), 228 (94.2%) completed 1 yr of denosumab therapy. After 12 months, denosumab resulted in BMD increases of 5.7% at the LS, 2.4% at the total hip, 2.1% at the femoral neck, 3.1% at the trochanter, and 0.6% at the one third radius (adjusted P≥0.0144 for BMD percent differences at all sites compared with placebo). Sensitivity analyses done by controlling for baseline covariates (such as baseline testosterone levels, BMD T-scores, and 10-yr osteoporotic fracture risk) demonstrated that the results of the primary endpoint were robust. Subgroup analyses indicate that treatment with denosumab was effective across a spectrum of clinical situations. Treatment with denosumab significantly reduced serum CTX levels at d 15 (adjusted P < 0.0001). The incidence of adverse events was similar between groups. Conclusions: One year of denosumab therapy in men with low BMD was well tolerated and resulted in a reduction in bone resorption and significant increases in BMD at all skeletal sites assessed. Copyright © 2012 by The Endocrine Society. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRandomized, placebo-controlled trial of the anti-tumor necrosis factor antibody fragment afelimomab in hyperinflammatory response during severe sepsis: The RAMSES Study
Reinhart, Konrad; Menges, Thilo; Gardlund, Bengt et al

in Critical Care Medicine (2001), 29(4), 765-769

Objective: This study investigated whether treatment with the anti-tumor necrosis factor-a monoclonal antibody afelimomab would improve survival in septic patients with serum interleukin (IL)-6 ... [more ▼]

Objective: This study investigated whether treatment with the anti-tumor necrosis factor-a monoclonal antibody afelimomab would improve survival in septic patients with serum interleukin (IL)-6 concentrations of >1000 pg/mL. Design: Multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Setting: Eighty-four intensive care units in academic medical centers in Europe and Israel. Patients: A total of 944 septic patients were screened and stratified by the results of a rapid qualitative immunostrip test for serum IL-6 concentrations. Patients with a positive test kit result indicating IL-6 concentrations of >1000 pg/mL were randomized to receive either afelimomab (n 5 224) or placebo (n 5 222). Patients with a negative IL-6 test (n 5 498) were not randomized and were followed up for 28 days. Interventions: Treatment consisted of 15-min infusions of 1 mg/kg afelimomab or matching placebo every 8 hrs for 3 days. Standard surgical and intensive care therapy was otherwise delivered. Measurements and Main Results: The study was terminated prematurely after an interim analysis estimated that the primary efficacy end points would not be met. The 28-day mortality rate in the nonrandomized patients (39.6%, 197 of 498) was significantly lower (p < .001) than that found in the randomized patients (55.8%, 249 of 446). The mortality rates in the IL-6 test kit positive patients randomized to afelimomab and placebo were similar, 54.0% (121 of 224) vs. 57.7% (128 of 222), respectively. Treatment with afelimomab was not associated with any particular adverse events. Conclusions: The IL-6 immunostrip test identified two distinct sepsis populations with significantly different mortality rates. A small (3.7%) absolute reduction in mortality rate was found in the afelimomab-treated patients. The treatment difference did not reach statistical significance. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLe ranelate de strontium (Protelos)
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2007), 62(11), 685-7

Strontium ranelate, with its unique mode of action combining inhibition of bone resorption and stimulation of bone formation is characterized by a wide scatter of activity, both in terms of skeletal sites ... [more ▼]

Strontium ranelate, with its unique mode of action combining inhibition of bone resorption and stimulation of bone formation is characterized by a wide scatter of activity, both in terms of skeletal sites positively affected and of patients experiencing benefits of its administration. It is currently reimbursed, in Belgium, in osteoporotic patients aged 80 years and older. In this group, it is the only drug which has shown an extensive range of anti-fracture efficacy. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 169 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRanélate de strontium : efficacité à long terme sur 10 ans chez les femmes ménopausées ostéoporotiques
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Goemaere, S. et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2010, November), 77(Suppl.3), 99-100

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLe ranélate de strontium augmente la viabilité de chondrocytes humains stimulés par IL-1 bêta
Merville, Marie-Paule ULg; Deroyer, Céline ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2010, November), 77(Suppl.3), 222

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLe ranélate de strontium diminue la proportion de patients progressant rapidement dès la première année : une analyse post hoc de l'étude SEKOIA
Chevalier, X; Richette, P; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2013), 80(S1), 59-60

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLe ranélate de strontium diminue le nombre de progresseurs radiologiques ou radiocliniques chez les patients ayant une arthrose primaire du genou
Chevalier, X; Chapurlat, R; Cooper, C et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2012), 79(S1), 270

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRanelato de estroncio : Um tratamentao de primeira linha para a osteoporose pos-menopausica
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Expert Approaches in Osteoporosis (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (6 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailRange dependence compensation in STAP for arbitrary engagement geometries and receiver antenna arrays
Ries, Philippe; De Grève, Sébastien; Neyt, Xavier et al

Conference (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 1 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe range-dependance problem of clutter spectrum for non-sidelooking monostatic STAP radars
Lapierre, Fabian D.; Verly, Jacques ULg

Conference (2002, March)

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailRange-dependence compensation in airborne bistatic STAP radar for partially-calibrated conformal antenna arrays
Ries, Philippe; Lapierre, Fabian D.; Lesturgie, Marc et al

Conference (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailRange-dependence compensation in bistatic radar STAP
Lapierre, Fabian D.; Verly, Jacques ULg

Conference (2004)

Detailed reference viewed: 1 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailRange-dependence Issues in Multistatic STAP-based Radar
Neyt, Xavier; Acheroy, Marc; Verly, Jacques ULg

Conference (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRange90 as indicator for ventilator output versus patients demand: NAVA and pressure support for non-invasively ventilated patients
Chiew, YS; Piquilloud, L.; LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULg et al

in Proceedings of the World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering 2012 (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (2 ULg)
See detailRanging behaviour and sleeping sites in Macaca fascicularis at Bali Barat National Park, Indonesia
Brotcorne, Fany ULg; Maslarov, Cindy; Dosogne, Thibaut et al

Conference (2011, October 26)

Ranging behaviour and sleeping site selection are important aspects of primate ecology in their adaptation to the environment. Several non-exclusive factors have been suggested to explain sleeping site ... [more ▼]

Ranging behaviour and sleeping site selection are important aspects of primate ecology in their adaptation to the environment. Several non-exclusive factors have been suggested to explain sleeping site selection in primates: predation avoidance, food resources proximity, interactions with conspecifics, physical comfort, and parasite avoidance. We tested the role of some factors in a group of Macaca fascicularis living in a human-modified landscape in Bali Barat National Park, during 3 months from April-June 2011. Despite the large area of available forest, the group’s home range was centred around human-settlements (park headquarters). The home range size, as well as the average daily range and daily travel, decreased over the study months. These results correlated with the increase of human presence inside the park over the corresponding months. Regarding sleeping sites, the use pattern also seemed to be influenced by the attraction to human settlements. Indeed, macaques slept more than expected close to human-settlements and this tendency increased over the months. 75% of the 56 observed nights were spent inside the core area, an argument for the role of intergroup competition avoidance. In contradiction with the predation avoidance assumption, the DBH and the height of sleeping trees were not significantly greater than those of control trees. On the other hand, most of sleeping trees had no liana on the trunk and a high arboreal connectivity with surrounding trees. Also, the rate of consecutive sleeping site reuse was very low (12%), minimizing the detection by predators. We conclude that the main strategy of this M. fascicularis group could be sleeping not too far from humans because it is advantageous for predator avoidance and proximity to human food, but that additional influences should not be neglected. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)