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See detailLung function and airway inflammation monitoring after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
Moermans, Catherine ULg; Poulet, Christophe ULg; HENKET, Monique ULg et al

in Respiratory Medicine (2013), 107

Background Induced sputum is a non-invasive method to investigate airway inflammation, which has been used to assess pulmonary inflammatory diseases. However, this procedure has not been studied in the ... [more ▼]

Background Induced sputum is a non-invasive method to investigate airway inflammation, which has been used to assess pulmonary inflammatory diseases. However, this procedure has not been studied in the context of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Methods We monitored lung function in 182 patients who underwent HSCT and measured airway inflammation by sputum induction in 80 of them. We prospectively measured FEV1, FVC, DLCO, KCO, TLC, RV, exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) as well as sputum cell counts before and 3, 6, 12, 24 and 36 months after HSCT. Results For the whole cohort there was a progressive decrease in TLC, which was significant after 3 years (p < 0.01). By contrast, there was no change in other lung functions parameters or in FeNO. Baseline sputum analysis revealed increased neutrophil counts in patients {Median (IQR): 63% (38–79)} compared to healthy subjects matched for age {Median (IQR): 49% (17–67), p < 0.001} but there was no significant change in any type of sputum cell counts over the three years. When comparing myeloablative (MA) vs non-myeloablative (NMA) conditioning, falls in FEV1, FVC and DLCO, and rise in RV and sputum neutrophils were more pronounced over the first year of observation in those receiving MA. Conclusions There was a progressive loss in lung function after HSCT, featuring a restrictive pattern. Myeloablative conditioning was associated with early rise of sputum neutrophils and greater alteration in lung function over the first year. [less ▲]

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See detailLung inflammation and thrombogenic responses in a time course study of Csb mice exposed to ozone.
Kooter, Ingeborg M; Frederix, Kim ULg; Spronk, Henri M H et al

in Journal of Applied Toxicology (2008), 28(6), 779-87

Ozone is a well-known oxidant air pollutant, inhalation of which can result in oxidative stress, and lead to pulmonary inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the time-course events after a ... [more ▼]

Ozone is a well-known oxidant air pollutant, inhalation of which can result in oxidative stress, and lead to pulmonary inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the time-course events after a single ozone exposure in transcription-coupled repair defective Csb and wild type mice. Mice were exposed for 3 h to 2 ppm ozone and biological parameters related to oxidative stress and inflammation were examined in the lungs at 0, 4, 9, 24 and 48 h after exposure. In addition the procoagulant and thrombomodulin activities were explored by a combination of assays for tissue factor and thrombin generation.This study revealed a significant biological response to ozone, for both Csb and wild type mice. The onset of inflammation in Csb mice, as indicated by an increase in interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and total cell influx, occurred earlier compared with those seen in wild type mice. On the other hand, Csb mice showed a delayed antioxidant reaction compared with wild type mice. Both genotypes developed a procoagulant reaction characterized by a stably increased tissue factor activity and a progressive increase in thrombin generation after 2 days.These experiments have shown that ozone, a well-known toxic substance from the environment, induces not only inflammation, but also procoagulant reactions in the lungs of mice. These results have implications for understanding the systemic effects induced by oxidant air pollutants. [less ▲]

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See detailLung interstitial macrophages alter dendritic cell functions to prevent airway allergy in mice
Bedoret, Denis ULg; Wallemacq, Hugues ULg; Marichal, Thomas ULg et al

in Journal of Clinical Investigation (2009), 119(12), 3723-38

The respiratory tract is continuously exposed to both innocuous airborne antigens and immunostimulatory molecules of microbial origin, such as LPS. At low concentrations, airborne LPS can induce a lung DC ... [more ▼]

The respiratory tract is continuously exposed to both innocuous airborne antigens and immunostimulatory molecules of microbial origin, such as LPS. At low concentrations, airborne LPS can induce a lung DC-driven Th2 cell response to harmless inhaled antigens, thereby promoting allergic asthma. However, only a small fraction of people exposed to environmental LPS develop allergic asthma. What prevents most people from mounting a lung DC-driven Th2 response upon exposure to LPS is not understood. Here we have shown that lung interstitial macrophages (IMs), a cell population with no previously described in vivo function, prevent induction of a Th2 response in mice challenged with LPS and an experimental harmless airborne antigen. IMs, but not alveolar macrophages, were found to produce high levels of IL-10 and to inhibit LPS-induced maturation and migration of DCs loaded with the experimental harmless airborne antigen in an IL-10-dependent manner. We further demonstrated that specific in vivo elimination of IMs led to overt asthmatic reactions to innocuous airborne antigens inhaled with low doses of LPS. This study has revealed a crucial role for IMs in maintaining immune homeostasis in the respiratory tract and provides an explanation for the paradox that although airborne LPS has the ability to promote the induction of Th2 responses by lung DCs, it does not provoke airway allergy under normal conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailLung interstitial macrophages prevent lipopolysaccharide-triggered T helper type 2 responses to harmless inhaled antigens
Bedoret, D.; Wallemacq, Hugues ULg; Marichal, Thomas ULg et al

in Proceedings of the Annual BIS-meeting (2008)

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See detailLung interstitial macrophages prevent the development of respiratory allergy
Bedoret, D.; Wallemacq, Hugues ULg; Marichal, Thomas ULg et al

in Proceedings of The Keystone Symposia: Allergy and Asthma. Keystone, Colorado, USA (2009)

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See detailLung resident eosinophils represent a distinct cell subset with homeostatic functions
Mesnil, Claire ULg; Raulier, Stéfanie ULg; Paulissen, Geneviève et al

Conference (2016, October 21)

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See detailLung scanning in calves using technegas
Votion, Dominique ULg; Coghe, J.; Lekeux, Pierre ULg

in Plügers Archives European Journal of Physiology (1998)

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See detailLung-resident CD4 T cells are sufficient for IL-4Ralpha-dependent recall immunity to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection.
Thawer, S. G.; Horsnell, W. Gc; Darby, M. et al

in Mucosal Immunology (2014), 7(2), 239-248

Immunity to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis reinfection requires pulmonary CD4+ T-cell responses. We examined whether secondary lymphoid recruited or pre-existing lung CD4+ T-cell populations coordinated ... [more ▼]

Immunity to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis reinfection requires pulmonary CD4+ T-cell responses. We examined whether secondary lymphoid recruited or pre-existing lung CD4+ T-cell populations coordinated this immunity. To do this, we blocked T-cell egress from lymph nodes using Fingolimod (FTY720). This impaired host ability to resolve a primary infection but did not change effectiveness of recall immunity. Associated with this effective recall immunity was the expansion and T helper type 2 polarization of a pre-existing pulmonary CD4+ T-cell population. LTbetaR-Ig (lymphotoxin beta-receptor fusion protein)-mediated disruption of stromal cell organization of immune cells did not disrupt this recall immunity, suggesting that protection was mediated by a pulmonary interstitial residing CD4+ T-cell population. Adoptive transfer of N. brasiliensis-experienced pulmonary CD4+ T cells from FTY720-treated wild-type or T-cell interleukin (IL)-4Ralpha-deficient mice demonstrated protection to be IL-4Ralpha dependent. These results show that pre-existing CD4+ T cells can drive effective recall immunity to N. brasiliensis infection independently of T-cell recruitment from secondary lymphoid organs.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication 19 June 2013; doi:10.1038/mi.2013.40. [less ▲]

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See detailLung-resident eosinophils represent a distinct regulatory eosinophil subset
Mesnil, Claire ULg; Raulier, Stéfanie ULg; Paulissen, G et al

in Journal of Clinical Investigation (2016), 126(9), 3275-3295

Increases in eosinophil numbers are associated with infection and allergic diseases, including asthma, but there is also evidence that eosinophils contribute to homeostatic immune processes. In mice, the ... [more ▼]

Increases in eosinophil numbers are associated with infection and allergic diseases, including asthma, but there is also evidence that eosinophils contribute to homeostatic immune processes. In mice, the normal lung contains resident eosinophils (rEos), but their function has not been characterized. Here, we have reported that steady-state pulmonary rEos are IL-5–independent parenchymal Siglec-FintCD62L+CD101lo cells with a ring-shaped nucleus. During house dust mite–induced airway allergy, rEos features remained unchanged, and rEos were accompanied by recruited inflammatory eosinophils (iEos), which were defined as IL-5–dependent peribronchial Siglec-FhiCD62L–CD101hi cells with a segmented nucleus. Gene expression analyses revealed a more regulatory profile for rEos than for iEos, and correspondingly, mice lacking lung rEos showed an increase in Th2 cell responses to inhaled allergens. Such elevation of Th2 responses was linked to the ability of rEos, but not iEos, to inhibit the maturation, and therefore the pro-Th2 function, of allergen-loaded DCs. Finally, we determined that the parenchymal rEos found in nonasthmatic human lungs (Siglec-8+CD62L+IL-3Rlo cells) were phenotypically distinct from the iEos isolated from the sputa of eosinophilic asthmatic patients (Siglec-8+CD62LloIL-3Rhi cells), suggesting that our findings in mice are relevant to humans. In conclusion, our data define lung rEos as a distinct eosinophil subset with key homeostatic functions. [less ▲]

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See detailLungenfibrose
Clercx, Cécile ULg

in Proceedings of the 34. Internationaler Fortbildungskurs Kleintierkrankheiten : “Thorax – Herz- und Lungenerkrankungen" - Flims -Switzerland (2013, February)

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See detailLungworm disease in cats : ABCD guidelines on prevention and management
Pennisi, M.G.; Hartmann, K.; Addie, D.D. et al

in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2015), 17

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See detailLUPA: a European initiative taking advantage of the canine genome architecture for unravelling complex disorders in both human and dogs.
Lequarré, Anne-Sophie ULg; Andersson, Leif; Andre, Catherine et al

in Veterinary Journal (2011), 189(2), 155-9

The domestic dog offers a unique opportunity to explore the genetic basis of disease, morphology and behaviour. Humans share many diseases with our canine companions, making dogs an ideal model organism ... [more ▼]

The domestic dog offers a unique opportunity to explore the genetic basis of disease, morphology and behaviour. Humans share many diseases with our canine companions, making dogs an ideal model organism for comparative disease genetics. Using newly developed resources, genome-wide association studies in dog breeds are proving to be exceptionally powerful. Towards this aim, veterinarians and geneticists from 12 European countries are collaborating to collect and analyse the DNA from large cohorts of dogs suffering from a range of carefully defined diseases of relevance to human health. This project, named LUPA, has already delivered considerable results. The consortium has collaborated to develop a new high density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. Mutations for four monogenic diseases have been identified and the information has been utilised to find mutations in human patients. Several complex diseases have been mapped and fine mapping is underway. These findings should ultimately lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying complex diseases in both humans and their best friend. [less ▲]

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See detailLe lupin : ses aspects nutritionnels et son intégration dans les rations des ruminants
Beckers, Yves ULg; Froidmont, Eric

Conference given outside the academic context (2009)

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See detailLupin seeds as a substitute to soybean in broiler chiken feeding : incorporation level and enzyme preparation effects on performances, digestibility and meat composition.
Froidmont, Eric; Beckers, Yves ULg; Dehareng, frédéric et al

in 55th Meeting of European Association of Animal Production (2004, September)

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See detailLe lupus érythémateux systémique
Malaise, Michel ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1992), 47(10), 481-501

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See detailLupus-TR-3b: A Low-Mass Transiting Hot Jupiter in the Galactic Plane?
Weldrake, David T F; Bayliss, Daniel D R; Sackett, Penny D et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2008), 675

We present a strong case for a transiting hot Jupiter planet identified during a single-field transit survey toward the Lupus Galactic plane. The object, Lupus-TR-3b, transits a V=17.4 K1 V host star ... [more ▼]

We present a strong case for a transiting hot Jupiter planet identified during a single-field transit survey toward the Lupus Galactic plane. The object, Lupus-TR-3b, transits a V=17.4 K1 V host star every 3.91405 days. Spectroscopy and stellar colors indicate a host star with effective temperature 5000 +/- 150 K, with a stellar mass and radius of 0.87 +/- 0.04 M[SUB]solar[/SUB] and 0.82 +/- 0.05 R[SUB]solar[/SUB], respectively. Limb-darkened transit fitting yields a companion radius of 0.89+/-0.07 R[SUB]J[/SUB] and an orbital inclination of 88.3[SUP]+1.3[/SUP][SUB]-0.8[/SUB] deg. Magellan 6.5 m MIKE radial velocity measurements reveal a 2.4 sigma K = 114 +/- 25 m s[SUP]-1[/SUP] sinusoidal variation in phase with the transit ephemeris. The resulting mass is 0.81 +/- 0.18 M[SUB]J[/SUB] and density 1.4 +/- 0.4 g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP]. Y-band PANIC image deconvolution reveals a V>=21 red neighbor 0.4[SUP]''[/SUP] away which, although highly unlikely, we cannot conclusively rule out as a blended binary with current data. However, blend simulations show that only the most unusual binary system can reproduce our observations. This object is very likely a planet, detected from a highly efficient observational strategy. Lupus-TR-3b constitutes the faintest ground-based detection to date, and one of the lowest mass hot Jupiters known. [less ▲]

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See detailThe lure of pedogenesis. An anthropological foray into making urban soils in contemporary France
Meulemans, Germain ULg

Doctoral thesis (2017)

This thesis is an anthropological inquiry into the emergence of urban soils as matters of concern in the worlds of soil scientists and other fields more traditionally involved with cities. City soils have ... [more ▼]

This thesis is an anthropological inquiry into the emergence of urban soils as matters of concern in the worlds of soil scientists and other fields more traditionally involved with cities. City soils have typically been neglected in modern thinking about nature and urbanism. They have long been framed solely as a technical question which seemed to require no further pondering until – in the last two decades – they entered the scope of the soil sciences. This thesis draws on over 13 months of multi-locale fieldwork conducted in Paris and Lorraine with soil scientists, gardeners and foundation builders. Through the lens of soil-making practices, it seeks to elucidate the specificity of new forms of urban pedogenesis, including the growth of soils and the lives of the humans associated with them. Building on scholarship in anthropology, the soil sciences, science studies, and speculative philosophy, it follows how these actors learn to be affected in the material performance of different relations between people and soils. Occasionally turning to narrative to complement analysis and more traditional ethnography, each chapter pulls a different diffractive string from the mesh of urban soil matters, and follows where it leads in what Deleuze and Guattari call an ‘itinerant’ mode of research. As ways of knowing that emerge from soil construction are described, the question of what making soils does to knowing them becomes a central thread of the thesis. In this, it looks at how soils participate in apparatuses where they become ‘lures for feelings’ – affective interweavings in which worlds are experienced. The introduction sets the stage for the thesis, and explains how the fieldwork was conducted. It sets pointers for the rest of the work by explaining the attentive, yet critical posture it adopts towards scientific theories of soils. The thesis is then divided into two parts: the first part (chapters 1-4) presents a detailed consideration of the world being newly explored by urban soil scientists, and showcases key points of encounter between pedology, the environmental sciences and themes such as urban sprawl, ‘peak soil’, and ‘the Anthropocene’. It starts by problematizing the movement by which, in the 19th century, urban soils became ‘blackboxed’ when their hard sealing initiated a long standing separation between earth and sky. This is followed by an examination of the renewed interest towards urban soils in realms as diverse as city planning, waste management and hydraulics. The thesis then turns to exploring more specifically the impact of urban soils on soil science research in France. It describes how the new urban soil sciences invoke non-linear ecological dynamics, and how they question distinctions such as those between the living and the non-living, and between the human and the natural. In the face of this questioning, scientists started to experiment with urban soils by engaging directly in their construction through their ‘ecological engineering’. Rejecting separations between making and theory, these practices are understood by attending to soil scientist’s digging practices, described as ways of learning to be affected by soils and their liveliness. This part concludes with a study of the multispecies interactions entailed in soil ecologists’ attempts to ‘collaborate’ with earthworms and other soil organisms. An analysis of the modes of joint becoming of soils and humans at play in soil construction is developed by way of a reinterpretation of the soil sciences’ concept of pedogenesis. These ideas are developed in the second part of the thesis (chapters 5-7), which addresses practices of urban soil construction in the fields of urban gardening and foundation building, and introduces an art and anthropology experiment. It first presents the work of urban gardeners who develop their own understanding of city soils and botany, and attempt to grow knowledge, soils and community by adapting ancient rural practices of earth working to the reclamation of city interstices. It then introduces the work of foundation builders, and shows that far from entailing soils as inert matter that would be malleable at will, their work can be characterised as a play on equilibrium across interfaces of exchange. The thesis concludes with the presentation of an art, anthropology and soil science experiment in which the author participated. In this experiment fieldwork was re-interrogated by means of narrative speculation and installation making. This finally provides the grounds from which to draw methodological conclusions for an experimental anthropology, premised on the interweaving of imagination and practice. [less ▲]

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