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Peer Reviewed
See detailMiddle energy PIXE preliminary experiments
Dupuis, Thomas ULg; Mathis, François ULg; Marchal, André ULg et al

Conference (2008)

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See detailThe Middle Holocene Shell Mound of el Gouna on the Red Sea (Egypt)
Vermeersch, Pierre; Van Peer, Philip; Rots, Veerle ULg et al

in Journal of Field Archaeology (2006), 30

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See detailLe middle management sous pression. La difficile intégration du référentiel managérial issu du NPM dans les organisations au service de l'intérêt général
Pichault, François ULg; Schoenaers, Frédéric ULg

in Revue Internationale de Psychosociologie (2012), Vol XVIII(45), 121-150

Dans cet article, nous mettons en évidence les processus de diffusion d'instruments de gestion destinés à contrôler les performances au sein des organisations. En mobilisant le concept de "sensemaking ... [more ▼]

Dans cet article, nous mettons en évidence les processus de diffusion d'instruments de gestion destinés à contrôler les performances au sein des organisations. En mobilisant le concept de "sensemaking", les enjeux de la mise en place effective de ces instruments sont mis en évidence. [less ▲]

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See detailMiddle management under pressure: sensemaking activities around the implementation of new managerial devices in the General interest
Pichault, François ULg; Schoenaers, Frédéric ULg

Conference (2013, July)

The paper is structured around three sections. The first one will help to highlight the way in which the scientific literature documents the appropriation of management control systems by middle or local ... [more ▼]

The paper is structured around three sections. The first one will help to highlight the way in which the scientific literature documents the appropriation of management control systems by middle or local managers. It leads us to develop a first hypothesis expressed in institutional terms. In a second step, three case studies are presented, where the relationship to the notion of general interest — supposed to reflect public action— is contrasted: a “pure” public service (Judicorps), a private organisation acting on behalf of a public service (Federmut) and a formerly public but now privatised company (National Telecom). In a third step, we discuss the results gathered, invalidating our initial hypothesis, and propose an alternative explanation of the phenomena observed, referring to the actor-network theory (Akrich, Callon & Latour, 2006), the sensemaking activities of local managers (Weick, 1995) and the disciplinary power of managerial devices (Foucault, 1994). [less ▲]

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See detailMiddle Miocene climate and vegetation model reconstructions and their validation with the NECLIME database
François, Louis ULg; Henrot, Alexandra-Jane ULg; Utescher, Torsten et al

in Geophys. Res. Abstracts (2014), 16

The NECLIME database gathers data of the fossil flora recorded at many localities around the world at different times of the Miocene. François et al. (Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology ... [more ▼]

The NECLIME database gathers data of the fossil flora recorded at many localities around the world at different times of the Miocene. François et al. (Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 304, 359–378, 2011) have presented a new method for evaluating palaeoclimate model simulations from such fossil floras. In this method, palaeovegetation is simulated from climate model outputs, using a dynamic vegetation model. Model vegetation reconstruction is then compared to the vegetation cover indicated by the fossil flora record at the various localities, using a common classification of plant functional types (PFTs) in the data and the model. Here, we apply this method to test several published Middle Miocene climate simulations conducted with General Circulation Models of different complexity: (a) Planet Simulator, (b) FOAM-LMDZ4, (c) MPI-ESM, (d) CCSM3.0 and (4) CESM1.0. Corresponding palaeovegetation distributions are simulated with the CARAIB dynamic vegetation model, in which an upgraded vegetation classification involving 26 PFTs has been imple- mented. The NECLIME palaeoflora data from 154 localities distributed worldwide have been translated in terms of the presence/absence of these PFTs. A comparison of models and data is then undertaken globally and in selected regions of the world, using all available localities. The level of agreement varies among models, among PFTs and among regions. For instance, some models are able to produce tropical and subtropical PFTs in Europe consistently with the data, but the agreement for these PFTs may be much poorer in other parts of the world, such as in northeastern Eurasia. [less ▲]

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See detailMiddle Miocene climate and vegetation modelling with PLASIM and CARAIB
Henrot, Alexandra ULg; François, Louis ULg; Favre, Eric ULg et al

Conference (2009, April 21)

In a long-term climatic cooling trend, the Middle Miocene represents one of the last warm periods of the Neogene, culminating with the Miocene Climatic Optimum, MCO (17-15 My). Palynological studies ... [more ▼]

In a long-term climatic cooling trend, the Middle Miocene represents one of the last warm periods of the Neogene, culminating with the Miocene Climatic Optimum, MCO (17-15 My). Palynological studies suggest that the warmer climatic conditions prevailing during the MCO allowed warm forests to expand poleward of the subtropical zone, with evergreen forests proliferating in North America and Europe (Jimenez-Moreno and Suc, 2007, Palaeogeogr. Palaeoclimatol. Palaeoecol. 253: 208-225). In this work, we used the Planet Simulator (Fraedrich et al., 2005, Meteorol. Z. 14: 299-304 and 305-314), an Earth system model of intermediate complexity, to carry out several simulation experiments, where we have assessed the effects of the absence of ice on the continents, the opening of the Central American and Eastern Tethys seaways, the lowering of the topography on land and the effect of various atmospheric CO2 concentrations, in agreement with the values reported in the litterature. We then produced several vegetation distributions, using the dynamic vegetation model CARAIB (Galy et al., 2008, Quat. Sci. Rev. 27: 1396-1409), to analyse if the climatic forcings considered are sufficient to explain the expansion of warmer forest types to higher latitudes. Our results indicate that an increase of atmospheric CO2 concentration, higher than the present-day one, is necessary to allow subtropical forest types to expand poleward. This result agrees with recent paleo-atmospheric CO2 reconstruction from stomatal frequency analysis, which suggests 500 ppmv of CO2 during the MCO. However, the required warming may be due to processes not considered in our setup (e.g. full oceanic circulation or other greenhouse gases). [less ▲]

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See detailMiddle Miocene climate and vegetation models and their validation with proxy data
Henrot, Alexandra-Jane ULg; Utescher, T.; Erdei, B. et al

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2016)

The Miocene is a relatively recent epoch of the Earth's history with warmer climate than today, particularly during the middle Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO, approximately 17-15Ma). Although the cause of ... [more ▼]

The Miocene is a relatively recent epoch of the Earth's history with warmer climate than today, particularly during the middle Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO, approximately 17-15Ma). Although the cause of the warming is probably not only attributable to CO2, but also to changes in orography and configuration of ocean gateways, this time interval represents an ideal case study to test the ability of climate models to simulate warm climates comparable to those that the Earth may experience in the near future. However, even with higher than present-day CO2 concentrations, the MMCO warming inferred from terrestrial proxy data has been difficult to reproduce in climate models.Since fossil flora do not provide direct information on climate, but on flora and vegetation, climate model results are generally compared to climate reconstructions obtained from the fossil flora. In this study, we apply an alternative method by simulating palaeovegetation from the outputs of the climate model, using a dynamic vegetation model. Model vegetation reconstruction can then be compared to the vegetation cover indicated by the fossil flora record at the various localities, provided that a common classification of plant functional types (PFTs) is used for the data and the model. Here, we reconstruct the vegetation of the middle Miocene with the global dynamic vegetation model CARAIB, using the climatologies derived from five atmospheric general circulation models. The reliability of the simulations is examined on a presence/absence basis of PFTs by comparison of vegetation reconstructions to palaeoflora data recorded in the Northern Hemisphere and the Tropics.This comparison provides an overall agreement around 60% between model and data, when all sites and tree types are considered. Three model simulations out of five show to be better at predicting the absence than the presence. The presence of warm-temperate mixed forests in the middle latitudes, dominated by broadleaved deciduous warm temperate and subtropical trees is generally well reproduced in CARAIB simulations. However, poor agreement is obtained for the presence of tropical PFTs out of the Tropics and for warm PFTs at latitudes northward of 50°N, where climate models remain too cold to produce assemblages of trees consistent with the data. Nevertheless, the model-data comparison performed here highlights several mismatches that could result not only from missing feedbacks in the climate simulations, but also from the data. The results of the likelihood analysis on presence/absence of PFTs illustrate the uncertainties in the PFT classification of the Neogene floral records. The coexistence of some PFTs in the palaeovegetation data is impossible to reproduce in the vegetation model simulations because of the climatic definition of the modern PFTs. This result indicates either a bias in the identification of modern analogues for fossil plant taxa, or a possible evolution of environmental requirements of certain plants. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. [less ▲]

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See detailA Middle Paleolithic site with blade technology at Al Tiwayrat, Qena, Upper Egypt
Vermeersch, Pierre M.; Van Peer, Philip; Rots, Veerle ULg

in Antiquity (2005), 79(305),

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (0 ULg)
See detailThe Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition in the North-Western European plain
Flas, Damien ULg

Scientific conference (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (1 ULg)
See detailThe Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition in Europe: current issues
Flas, Damien ULg

Scientific conference (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (1 ULg)
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See detailThe Middle-Devonian proto-ovule Runcaria heinzelinii Stockmans 1968
Gerrienne, Philippe ULg; Meyer-Berthaud, B.; Fairon-Demaret, Muriel ULg et al

Conference (2005)

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (0 ULg)