Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailModelling the excavation damaged zone in claystone with strain localisation using coupled second gradient model and the influence of gallery ventilation
Pardoen, Benoît ULg; Levasseur, Séverine ULg; Collin, Frédéric ULg

Conference (2013, July 09)

Drilling of galleries induces stress perturbations that trigger damage propagation in the surrounding medium. The excavation process creates then the so-called excavation damaged zone around the galleries ... [more ▼]

Drilling of galleries induces stress perturbations that trigger damage propagation in the surrounding medium. The excavation process creates then the so-called excavation damaged zone around the galleries. The prediction of the extension and of the fracture structure within this zone remains nowadays a major issue especially in the context of underground storage. Since localised deformation in shear band mode is frequently observed in experimental works, the excavation damaged zone can be modelled by considering the development of shear strain localisation bands. To correctly model this behaviour, an enhanced model with a regularisation method is required. In underground structures, air ventilation inside the galleries induces a rock-atmosphere interaction that may lead to drainage and to rock desaturation close to the gallery wall. Such desaturation may influence the damage zone structure and needs to be studied. A hydro-mechanical modelling of a gallery excavation including air ventilation is thus performed and the numerical results provide information about the damaged zone extension, the strain localisation bands pattern and the influence of rock desaturation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 89 (20 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailModelling the fate of Listeria monocytogenes during manufacture and ripening of smeared cheese made with pasteurised or raw milk.
Schvartzman Echenique, Maria Sol ULg; Maffre, A.; Tenenhaus-Aziza, F. et al

in International journal of food microbiology (2011), 145 Suppl 1

The dynamics of the physicochemical characteristics of foods help to determine the fate of pathogens throughout processing. The aim of this study was to assess the behaviour of Listeria monocytogenes ... [more ▼]

The dynamics of the physicochemical characteristics of foods help to determine the fate of pathogens throughout processing. The aim of this study was to assess the behaviour of Listeria monocytogenes during cheesesmaking and ripening and to model the growth observed under the dynamic conditions of the cheese. A laboratory scale cheese was made in 4 independent replicates from pasteurised or raw cow's milk, artificially contaminated with L. monocytogenes. No growth of L. monocytogenes occurred during raw milk cheese-making, whereas growth did occur in pasteurised milk. During ripening, growth occurred in raw milk cheese, but inactivation occurred in pasteurised milk cheese. The behaviour observed for L. monocytogenes was modelled using a logistic primary model coupled with a secondary cardinal model, taking into account the effect of physicochemical conditions (temperature, pH, water activity and lactate). A novel statistical approach was proposed to assess the optimal growth rate of a microorganism from experiments performed in dynamic conditions. This complex model had an acceptable quality of fit on the experimental data. The estimated optimum growth rates can be used to predict the fate of L. monocytogenes during cheese manufacture in raw or pasteurized milk in different physicochemical conditions. The data obtained contributes to a better understanding of the potential risk that L. monocytogenes presents to cheese producers (growth on the product, if it is contaminated) and consumers (the presence of high numbers) and constitutes a very useful set of data for the completion of chain-based modelling studies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (3 ULg)
Full Text
See detailModelling the fracture generation in EDZ
Charlier, Robert ULg; Chambon, René; Al-Holo, Sama et al

in Report of the Swiss Geological Survey (2007), 2

Detailed reference viewed: 62 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailModelling the Fringing of the FORS2 CCD
Walsh, J. R.; Kuntschner, H.; Jehin, Emmanuel ULg et al

in Kaufer, A. (Ed.) The 2007 ESO Instrument Calibration Workshop (2008)

Thinned CCD detectors display fringing which arises from the interference of multiply reflected light in the layers of the CCD. If the layer construction - the thicknesses and refractive indexes of the ... [more ▼]

Thinned CCD detectors display fringing which arises from the interference of multiply reflected light in the layers of the CCD. If the layer construction - the thicknesses and refractive indexes of the layers - is known, then the observed fringing can be accurately modelled and used to correct imaging and spectroscopic data for its effects. In practice the specifications on the actual deposited layer thicknesses may not be known to sufficient accuracy to predict the fringe behaviour. Thus calibration data, in the form of monochromatic flat fields, is required and can be modelled using the technique outlined by Malamuth et al. 2003, which has been applied to ACS CCDs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailModelling the future range and productivity of African tree species. Perspectives and limits
Hambuckers, Alain ULg; Dury, Marie ULg; Tosso, Dji-ndé Félicien ULg et al

Poster (2014, June)

There remains a lack of information on the future of plant species in many parts of Africa under the threads of climate change with the exception of the mountainous areas. Models are valuables tools to ... [more ▼]

There remains a lack of information on the future of plant species in many parts of Africa under the threads of climate change with the exception of the mountainous areas. Models are valuables tools to examine this problem because they permit to extrapolate basic information as simple as species occurrence coming from a restricted number of localities to the entire continent. Niche-based models, like logistic regression or MaxEnt, easily allow fitting empirical relationships between environmental variables related to climate and possibly to soil properties. They produce probabilities of occurrence for the present with good accuracy (calibration phase). Projections for the future are made by switching the explanatory data set with future conditions. These models however are limited by the fact that it is difficult to integrate physiological response to increasing CO2 air concentration. Dynamic vegetation models (DVMs) are process-based models that simulate plant environment (soil water, light intensity at various heights, etc.) and plant physiology (transpiration, CO2 fixation, photosynthesis, respiration, carbon allocation, etc.) from climate variables, soil properties, and elevation. They could be run at various scales, from global to regional or even local scale, and simulate the growth of plant functional types (PFTs), of biological affinity groups (BAGs) or of species. A model like CARAIB is able to simulate PFTs and BAGs growth (occurrence and productivity) with rather good accuracy for Western Europe. For the future, the simulations confirm that the physiological effect of CO2 concentration change is dramatic but not easily foreseeable because it depends on overall fertility of the sites (Dury et al., iForest – Biogeosciences and Forestry, 4:82-99, 2011). From this conclusion, spatial and temporal variations of fertility would have to be introduced in modelling studies to reach more operational conclusions. Questions arising about the future of ecosystem services in tropical countries highlight particular plant species (BIOSERF project funded by the Belgian Science Policy: Sustainability of tropical forest biodiversity and services under climate and human pressure). In this study, we model a set of 11 selected African tree species including several Congolese species with logistic regression, MaxEnt and CARAIB models. The two niche-based-models rather properly simulate the ranges obtained with the alpha-hull polygon method. CARAIB correctly simulates the range of the evergreen species but not of the deciduous trees. We examine how physiological knowledge could be use to improve the model. IN particular, we conclude that bud dormancy breaking representation has to be upgraded in the model because this process is likely to control the range of the species. It should act in combination with the specific bioclimatic constants controlling the hydrological and thermal stress and the germination. Additionally, we examine the evolution of the ranges at the 2050 horizon using one of the most recent socio-economic scenarios. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 78 (11 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailModelling the general circulation of shelf seas by 3Dk-ε models
Nihoul, Jacques ULg; Deleersnijder, Eric; Djenidi, Salim ULg

in Earth-Science Reviews (1989), 26(1-3), 163-189

One examines the modifications which must be made-and the limitations which must be set-to classicalk-ε models to extend their application to the simulation of marine mesoscale, synopticscale and ... [more ▼]

One examines the modifications which must be made-and the limitations which must be set-to classicalk-ε models to extend their application to the simulation of marine mesoscale, synopticscale and macroscale processes which compose the weather-like and general circulations of the sea. The case of the general circulation—for which sub-grid scale fluctuations include such semi-organized motions as tides and storm surges-is discussed in more detail. A 3Dk-ε model appropriate to the study of the general circulation in a shallow stratified sea is presented and illustrated with the results of a simulation of the general summer circulation in the Northern Bering Sea, made in the scope of the NSF ISHTAR (“Inner Shelf Transfer and Recycling”) Program. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailModelling the Gibraltar Strait/Western Alboran Sea ecohydrodynamics
Skliris, Nikolaos; Beckers, Jean-Marie ULg

in Ocean Dynamics (2009), 59(3), 489-508

The ecohydrodynamics of the Gibraltar Strait and the Western Alboran Sea is investigated using a 3-D, two-way nested, coupled hydrodynamic/plankton ecosystem model, exploiting the MEDATLAS climatological ... [more ▼]

The ecohydrodynamics of the Gibraltar Strait and the Western Alboran Sea is investigated using a 3-D, two-way nested, coupled hydrodynamic/plankton ecosystem model, exploiting the MEDATLAS climatological database. A high-resolution model (~1 km) of the Gibraltar/Western Alboran region embedded within a coarse-resolution model of the West Mediterranean (~5 km) is implemented. The model seasonal climatology of the 3-D circulation and the flow characteristics at the Gibraltar Strait and the Alboran Sea are discussed, and their impact on the plankton ecosystem evolution is explored. An important ecohydrodynamic feature produced by the model is a permanent upwelling zone in the northwestern part of the Alboran Sea in agreement with observations. Model results show that both horizontal and vertical current intensity of the Atlantic Jet increases progressively at the strait to obtain maximum values in the northeastern Mediterranean entrance, inducing an upward displacement of the nitracline. The nutrient-rich water transport through the strait along with the generation of cyclonic vorticity in the northwestern Alboran Sea result in the accumulation of nutrients there and thus induce a permanent fertilisation of this area. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 105 (22 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailModelling the glacial-interglacial changes in the continental biosphere
François, Louis ULg; Delire, Christine; Warnant, Pierre ULg et al

in Global and Planetary Change (1998), 17

A new estimate of the glacial-interglacial variations of the terrestrial carbon storage was obtained with the CARAIB biosphere model. The climatic data for the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) necessary to ... [more ▼]

A new estimate of the glacial-interglacial variations of the terrestrial carbon storage was obtained with the CARAIB biosphere model. The climatic data for the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) necessary to drive the biosphere model are derived from results of the ECHAM2 General Circulation Model (GCM). Six model simulations (four under typical interglacial and two under typical glacial climatic conditions) were performed to analyse the roles of different environmental changes influencing the biospheric net primary productivity (NPP) and carbon stocks. The main differences between these simulations come from the adopted CO, levels in the atmosphere, the presence or absence of crops and from changing continental boundaries. The variation of the terrestrial carbon stocks since the LGM are estimated by comparing the pre-agricultural (280 ppm of CO2, no crops, modern climate) and the full glacial simulations (200 ppm of CO2, LGM climate reconstruction). Our model predicts a global NPP increase from 38 Gt C year(-1) to 53 Gt C year(-1) during the deglaciation, a substantial part of that change being due to CO, fertilization. At the same time, the terrestrial biosphere would have fixed between 134 (neglecting CO2 fertilization effects) and 606 Gt C. The treatment of both the C-3 and C-4 photosynthetic pathways in the CARAIB model enabled us further to reconstruct the partitioning between C, and C, plants. Following our experiments, 29.7% of the total biospheric carbon stock at the LGM was C-4 material, compared to an interglacial fraction of only 19.8%. The average biospheric fractionation factor was similar to 1.5 parts per thousand less negative at LGM than it is today. Considering an atmospheric delta(13)C 0.5 +/- 0.2 parts per thousand lower at LGM than at pre-industrial times, the 606 Gt C transfer would lead to a global ocean delta(13)C shift of roughly -0.41 parts per thousand, fully consistent with currently available data. For the smaller change of 134 Gt C obtained without the CO2 fertilization effect, this shift would only be on the order of -0.10 parts per thousand. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B,V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (2 ULg)
See detailModelling the Global Riverine U Fluxes to the Oceans
Riotte, Jean; Goddéris, Yves; Chabaux, François et al

Conference (2005, May 21)

Mean U isotopic ratio of the ocean has remained roughly constant since about 600 kyrs (Henderson, 2001). This 1.14 value cannot be explained considering the present day value of the U riverine ratio (1.17 ... [more ▼]

Mean U isotopic ratio of the ocean has remained roughly constant since about 600 kyrs (Henderson, 2001). This 1.14 value cannot be explained considering the present day value of the U riverine ratio (1.17, Chabaux et al., 2001). However, the mean riverine ratio was calculated on half of the total continental runoff. Is this partial mean value really representative of the mean value? If yes, might this value have changed over a glacial-interglacial cycle ? We build up a numerical model calculating the flux of U transfer to the ocean through weathering. The spatial resolution of the model reaches 0.5°lat x0.5°long. Lithology is modified from Amiotte-Suchet et al. (2003). Weathering fluxes are estimated from simple parametric laws, calculating the flux of total dissolved solids from mean annual temperature and runoff. Soil PCO2 is used to estimate carbonate dissolution rates, and is calculated from a simulation of the Caraib model. Uranium fluxes are estimated proportional to the TDS flux, weighted by its abundance in the source rock. CO2 consumption through weathering is simultaneously computed. The 234U/238U ratio of the river is calculated according to a correlation existing between the measured 234U/238U and runoff, showing a decrease of this ratio with increasing runoff. The model is first validated over several large watersheds, including the Amazon, the Ganges-Brahmapoutra, the Mississippi, and the Congo rivers. Global runs are then performed, showing that the modelled mean global value is close to the measured partial mean of 1.17. We explore then possible variations of the modelled ratio at the last glacial maximum. Temperature and runoff fields are taken from LGM simulations of the ECHAM GCM. Extension of ice sheets is assumed to cut off part of the weathering fluxes, producing possible fluctuations in the riverine U isotopic ratio, as well as changes in the regional runoff pattern. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailModelling the habitat suitability of cetaceans:Example of the sperm whale in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea
Praca, Emilie; Gannier, Alexandre; Das, Krishna ULg et al

in Deep-Sea Research Part I, Oceanographic Research Papers (2009), (56), 648657

Cetaceans are mobile and spend long periods underwater. Because of this, modelling their habitat could be subject to a serious problem of false absence. Furthermore, extensive surveys at sea are time and ... [more ▼]

Cetaceans are mobile and spend long periods underwater. Because of this, modelling their habitat could be subject to a serious problem of false absence. Furthermore, extensive surveys at sea are time and money consuming, and presence–absence data are difficult to apply. This study compares the ability of two presence–absence and two presence-only habitat modelling methods and uses the example of the sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. The data consist of summer visual and acoustical detections of sperm whales, compiled between 1998 and 2005. Habitat maps were computed using topographical and hydrological eco-geographical variables. Four methods were compared: principal component analysis (PCA), ecological niche factor analysis (ENFA), generalized linear model (GLM) and multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS). The evaluation of the models was achieved by calculating the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) of the models and their respective area under the curve (AUC). Presence–absence methods (GLM, AUC=0.70, and MARS, AUC=0.79) presented better AUC than presence-only methods (PCA, AUC=0.58, and ENFA, AUC=0.66), but this difference was not statistically significant, except between the MARS and the PCA models. The four models showed an influence of both topographical and hydrological factors, but the resulting habitat suitability maps differed. The core habitat on the continental slope was well highlighted by the four models, while GLM and MARS maps also showed a suitable habitat in the offshore waters. Presence–absence methods are therefore recommended for modelling the habitat suitability of cetaceans, as they seem more accurate to highlight complex habitat. However, the use of presence-only techniques, in particular ENFA, could be very useful for a first model of the habitat range or when important surveys at sea are not possible. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 206 (23 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailModelling the Holocene migrational dynamics of Fagus sylvatica L. and Picea abies (L.) H. Karst
Lehsten, Lehsten; Dullinger, Stefan; Hülber, Karl et al

in Global Ecology and Biogeography (2014)

Aim: Vegetation dynamics and the competitive interactions involved are assumed to restrict the ability of species to migrate. But in most migration modelling approaches disturbance-driven succession and ... [more ▼]

Aim: Vegetation dynamics and the competitive interactions involved are assumed to restrict the ability of species to migrate. But in most migration modelling approaches disturbance-driven succession and competition processes are reduced to simple assumptions or are even missing. The aim of this study was to test a combination of a migration model and a dynamic vegetation model to estimate the migration of tree species controlled by climate, environment and local species dynamics such as succession and competition. Location: Europe. Methods: To estimate the effect of vegetation dynamics on the migration of European beech and Norway spruce, we developed a post-process migration tool (LPJ-CATS). This tool integrates outputs of the migration model CATS and the dynamic vegetation model LPJ-GUESS. The model LPJ-CATS relies on a linear dependency between the dispersal kernel and migration rate and is based on the assumption that competition reduces fecundity. Results: Simulating potential migration rates with the CATS model, which does not account for competition and disturbance, resulted in mean Holocene migra- tion rates of 435 ± 55 and 330 ± 95 m year−1 for the two species Picea abies and Fagus sylvatica, respectively. With LPJ-CATS, these mean migration rates were reduced to 250 ± 75 and 170 ± 60 m year−1 for spruce and beech, respectively. Moreover, LPJ-CATS simulated migration pathways of these two species that gen- erally comply well with those documented in the palaeo-records. Main conclusions: Our ‘hybrid’ modelling approach allowed for the simulation of generally realistic Holocene migration rates and pathways of the two study species on a continental scale. It suggests that competition can considerably modify spread rates, but also the magnitude of its effect depends on how close climate conditions are to the niche requirements of a particular species. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (18 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailModelling the huge, Herschel-resolved debris ring around HD 207129
Löhne, T.; Augereau, J.-C.; Ertel, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 537

Debris disks, which are inferred from the observed infrared excess to be ensembles of dust, rocks, and probably planetesimals, are common features of stellar systems. As the mechanisms of their formation ... [more ▼]

Debris disks, which are inferred from the observed infrared excess to be ensembles of dust, rocks, and probably planetesimals, are common features of stellar systems. As the mechanisms of their formation and evolution are linked to those of planetary bodies, they provide valuable information. The few well-resolved debris disks are even more valuable because they can serve as modelling benchmarks and help resolve degeneracies in modelling aspects such as typical grain sizes and distances. Here, we present an analysis of the HD 207129 debris disk, based on its well-covered spectral energy distribution and Herschel/PACS images obtained in the framework of the DUNES (DUst around NEarby Stars) programme. We use an empirical power-law approach to the distribution of dust and we then model the production and removal of dust by means of collisions, direct radiation pressure, and drag forces. The resulting best-fit model contains a total of nearly 10[SUP]-2[/SUP] Earth masses in dust, with typical grain sizes in the planetesimal belt ranging from 4 to 7 μm. We constrain the dynamical excitation to be low, which results in very long collisional lifetimes and a drag that notably fills the inner gap, especially at 70 μm. The radial distribution stretches from well within 100 AU in an unusual, outward-rising slope towards a rather sharp outer edge at about 170-190 AU. The inner edge is therefore smoother than that reported for Fomalhaut, but the contribution from the extended halo of barely bound grains is similarly small. Both slowly self-stirring and planetary perturbations could potentially have formed and shaped this disk. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 81 (3 ULg)
Full Text
See detailModelling the hydrodispersive behaviour of variably saturated chalk
Brouyère, Serge ULg

Conference (2003, April 02)

The presentation dscribes the mathematical and numerical modelling of solute tracer experiments in variably saturated chalk

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (0 ULg)
See detailModelling the hydrogeological environment for disposal of wastes in low permeability sediments
Dassargues, Alain ULg

Scientific conference (1996, November 07)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailModelling the hydrological response of an urban watershed Diachronic analysis of the effects of land use changes on storm runoff generation in the Upper Bukit Timah basin, Singapore
Cesar, Emilie ULg

Master's dissertation (2011)

This work consisted in the modelling of the rainfall-runoff relationships in the Upper Bukit Timah catchment in Singapore, in order to highlight the impacts of urbanisation on hydrology. The SWMM model, a ... [more ▼]

This work consisted in the modelling of the rainfall-runoff relationships in the Upper Bukit Timah catchment in Singapore, in order to highlight the impacts of urbanisation on hydrology. The SWMM model, a one-dimensional physically based model especially developed for urban areas, was mainly used. The parameters encoded into the model were determined by different means and several methods were used for their determination in order to assess their influence on the modelling.Using the final adjustment of the SWMM model, a diachronic analysis was performed in order to present the effects of urbanisation on runoff. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 75 (6 ULg)
Full Text
See detailModelling the hygrothermal behaviour of crop-based construction materials
Dubois, Samuel ULg

Doctoral thesis (2014)

In the context of developing sustainable buildings, crop-based construction materials appear as valuable products given their intrinsic environmental and technical qualities. Their ability to exchange ... [more ▼]

In the context of developing sustainable buildings, crop-based construction materials appear as valuable products given their intrinsic environmental and technical qualities. Their ability to exchange moisture with the surrounding environment and damping humidity peaks in rooms, referred to as moisture buffering, is often presented as a way to improve occupants comfort and otentially reduce the operational energy of the building. It is understandable why modelling their hygrothermal behaviour and evaluating the impact on indoor air volumes is essential during the design phases. This thesis explores themodelling of the hygrothermal behaviour of crop-basedmaterials with a numerical tool. The latter is developed in a widespread general computational environment that brings both modularity and interoperability. Three challenges are addressed: the improvement of mathematical description of crop-based materials in non-standard operating conditions, the improvement of materials properties determination, and the assessment of their impact at room-scale. Several experimental facilities are developed in parallel to validate the proposed approaches, focusing on two materials expected to improve indoor conditions: straw bales and lime-hemp concrete. Results show that the developedmodel allows improving the understanding and the characterization of these green materials at various scales of study. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 114 (13 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailModelling the impact of benthic filter-feeders on the composition and biomass of river plankton
Descy, Jean-Pierre; Everbecq, Etienne ULg; Gosselain, Véronique ULg et al

in Freshwater Biology (2003), 48(3), 404-417

1. The POTAMON model [Everbecq E. et al. (2001) Water Research, 35, 901] has been used to simulate the effect of benthic bivalves (mainly Dreissena polymorpha ) on the phytoplankton and zooplankton in a ... [more ▼]

1. The POTAMON model [Everbecq E. et al. (2001) Water Research, 35, 901] has been used to simulate the effect of benthic bivalves (mainly Dreissena polymorpha ) on the phytoplankton and zooplankton in a lowland Western European river (the Moselle). Here we use a modified version of the POTAMON model with five categories of phytoplankton (Stephanodiscus, Cyclotella -like, large diatoms, Skeletonema and non-siliceous algae) to model filter-feeding effects of benthic bivalves in the Moselle. Zooplankton has been represented in the model by two categories, Brachionus -like and Keratella -like rotifers. 2. According to density estimates from field surveys (Bachmann V. et al. (1995) Hydroecologie Appliquee, 7, 185, Bachmann V. & Usseglio-Polatera P. (1999) Hydrobiologia, 410, 39), zebra mussel density varied among river stretches, and increased through the year to a maximum in summer. Dreissena filtration rates from the literature were used, and mussels have been assumed to feed on different phytoplankton categories (but less on large and filamentous diatoms) as well as on rotifers. 3. The simulations suggest a significant impact of benthic filter-feeders on potamoplankton and water quality in those stretches where the mussels are abundant, their impact being maximal in summer. Consequently, different plankton groups were not affected to the same extent, depending on their period of development and on indirect effects, such as predation by mussels on herbivorous zooplankton. 4. A daily carbon balance for a typical summer shows the effect of benthic filter-feeders on planktonic and benthic processes: the flux of organic matter to the bottom is greatly enhanced at high mussel density; conversely, production and breakdown of organic carbon in the water column are reduced. Mussel removal would drive the carbon balance of the river toward autotrophy only in the downstream stretches. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (10 ULg)
See detailModelling the impact of wind turbines on the visual attractivity of landscapes at a regional scale
Van Rompaey, A.; Vanderheyden, V.; Schmitz, Serge ULg

in European Wind Energy Conference & Exhibition : Brussels Expo 31 March-3 April 2008 (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (5 ULg)
See detailModelling the inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes on the surface of smear-ripened cheese
Schvartzman Echenique, Maria Sol ULg; butler, f; Jordan, K

Scientific conference (2007, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)