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Peer Reviewed
See detailPlant greening - Biogenesis of photosynthetic apparatus in bean leaves irradiated shortly after germination
Schoefs, B.; Bertrand, M.; Franck, Fabrice ULg

in Photosynthetica (1992), 27(4), 497-504

Formation of the photosynthetic apparatus in dark-grown 2-day-old bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) leaves was studied. The photosystem 2 (PS 2) reaction centres started functioning 1 h after the beginning of ... [more ▼]

Formation of the photosynthetic apparatus in dark-grown 2-day-old bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) leaves was studied. The photosystem 2 (PS 2) reaction centres started functioning 1 h after the beginning of irradiation. Electron transport between the two photosystems started after 4 h of irradiation. The PS 2 units were able to transfer the excitation energy to each other after 10 h of greening. The photosynthetic activity appeared a long time before the typical 77 K fluorescence bands of green leaves appeared. [less ▲]

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See detailPlant growth promotion of tomato under field conditions in Burundi
Cawoy, Hélène ULg; Nihorimbere, Venant; Kakana, Pascal et al

Poster (2009, April 02)

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See detailPlant growth- promoting rhizobacteria emit volatiles compounds with biostimulation activity in dicot and monocot plant species.
du Jardin, Patrick ULg; Delaplace, Pierre ULg; Varin, Sébastien et al

in Perata, Pierdomenico; Brown, Patrick; Ponchet, Michel (Eds.) Abstracts Book for Oral and Poster Presentations of the 1st World Congress on the use of Biostimulants in Agriculture (2012, November)

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See detailPlant leaf roughness analysis by texture classification with generalized Fourier descriptors in a dimensionality reduction context
Journaux, L.; Simon, J.-C.; Destain, Marie-France ULg et al

in Precision Agriculture (2011), 12(3), 345-360

In the context of plant leaf roughness analysis for precision spraying, this study explores the capability and the performance of some combinations of pattern recognition and computer vision techniques to ... [more ▼]

In the context of plant leaf roughness analysis for precision spraying, this study explores the capability and the performance of some combinations of pattern recognition and computer vision techniques to extract the roughness feature. The techniques merge feature extraction, linear and nonlinear dimensionality reduction techniques, and several kinds of methods of classification. The performance of the methods is evaluated and compared in terms of the error of classification. The results for the characterization of leaf roughness by generalized Fourier descriptors for feature extraction, kernel-based methods such as support vector machines for classification and kernel discriminant analysis for dimensionality reduction were encouraging. These results pave the way to a better understanding of the adhesion mechanisms of droplets on leaves that will help to reduce and improve the application of phytosanitary products and lead to possible modifications of sprayer configurations. [less ▲]

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See detailThe plant Leclercqia (Lycopsida) in Gondwana: implications for reconstructing Middle Devonian palaeogeography
Meyer-Berthaud, B.; Fairon-Demaret, Muriel ULg; Steemans, Philippe ULg et al

in Geological Magazine (2003), 140(2), 119-130

Abundant and well-preserved material of the ligulate lycopsid genus Leclercqia is reported from a new Middle Devonian locality in northeastern Queensland (Australia). The plants occur in a chert horizon ... [more ▼]

Abundant and well-preserved material of the ligulate lycopsid genus Leclercqia is reported from a new Middle Devonian locality in northeastern Queensland (Australia). The plants occur in a chert horizon in the Storm Hill Sandstone of the Dosey-Craigie Platform. Lithological data and conodont analyses combined with information from in situ spores provide an age for the plant levels ranging from Eifelian, possibly Middle Eifelian, to Early Givetian. Plant taxonomic identification is based on vegetative and fertile stems that display both external morphology and anatomy. This material represents the best documented occurrence of Leclercqia outside Laurussia and possibly the earliest in Gondwana; it provides evidence that colonization of Gondwana by the species L. complexa was contemporaneous to that of Siberia and Kazakhstan. Analysis of the distribution patterns of L. complexa suggests that it was adapted to a wide range of environments, but within certain limits which we hypothesize to be those of a climatic belt. Such considerations support previous studies using other biological data, such as faunas and palynomorphs, for reconstructing Devonian palaeogeography. They favour a close proximity of Laurussia and Gondwana rather than the occurrence of a wide ocean separating the two palaeocontinents in Middle Devonian times. [less ▲]

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See detailPlant Lipidomics: Discerning Biological Function By Profiling Plant Complex Lipids Using Mass Spectrometry
Welti, R.; Shah, J.; Li, Wq. et al

in Frontiers in Bioscience : A Journal and Virtual Library (2007), 12

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See detailPlant monitoring and fault detection - Synergy between data reconciliation and principal component analysis
Amand, Thierry; Heyen, Georges ULg; Kalitventzeff, Boris ULg

in Computers & Chemical Engineering (2001), 25(4-6), 501-507

Data reconciliation and principal component analysis are tno recognised statistical methods used for plant monitoring and fault detection. We propose to combine them for increased efficiency. Data ... [more ▼]

Data reconciliation and principal component analysis are tno recognised statistical methods used for plant monitoring and fault detection. We propose to combine them for increased efficiency. Data reconciliation is used in the first step of the determination of the projection matrix for principal component analysis (eigenvectors). principal component analysis can then be applied to raw process data for monitoring purpose. The combined use of these techniques aims at a better efficiency in fault detection. It relies mainly in a lower number of components to monitor. The method is applied to a modelled ammonia synthesis loop. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailPlant oxylipins
Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULg

Conference (2005)

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See detailPlant Pathology unit of Gembloux: research activities and prospective
Jijakli, Haissam ULg

Conference (2005, May)

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See detailPlant protection at a crossroads in ACP countries
Schiffers, Bruno ULg

in Tunisian Journal of Plant Protection (2009), 4(1),

In Africa, and many other countries in the southern hemisphere (ACP - African, Caribbean and Pacific states), small farmers still practice subsistence farming, and the vast majority of producers of fruits ... [more ▼]

In Africa, and many other countries in the southern hemisphere (ACP - African, Caribbean and Pacific states), small farmers still practice subsistence farming, and the vast majority of producers of fruits and vegetables cultivate their crops over small plots of land, often for just a few weeks or a few months of the year. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (0 ULg)
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See detailPlant protection by videotex : life and death
Carletti, G.; Claustriaux, Jean-Jacques ULg

in Danish Journal of Plant and Soil Science - Special Series Report (1991), 85(S 2161), 41-43

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See detailPlant selection for nest building by western lowland gorillas in Cameroon
Willie, Jacob; Tagg, Nikki; Petre, Charles-Albert ULg et al

in Primates : Journal of Primatology (2014)

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See detailPlant species extinction debt in a biodiversity hotspot: community and species approaches
Piqueray, Julien ULg; Bisteau, Emmanuelle ULg; Cristofoli, Sara ULg et al

in Belgian Journal of Botany (2008), 141(2), 189

Destruction and fragmentation of natural and semi-natural habitats are considered as major threats for plant species richness. However, the response of plant species richness to habitat alteration is ... [more ▼]

Destruction and fragmentation of natural and semi-natural habitats are considered as major threats for plant species richness. However, the response of plant species richness to habitat alteration is sometimes delayed. This delay induces an extinction debt in plant communities that are thus prone to undergo species extinctions in the following years. Several methodologies were proposed to detect this extinction debt and estimate the mean number of species yet to disappear. In this study, we developed a new methodology for the estimation of the extinction debt extent. Moreover, we proposed a species approach aimed at determining which species are more sensitive to extinction as a consequence of habitat destruction and fragmentation. Finally, we explored the colonization ability of habitat specialist species. This aspect is of fi rst importance to counteract local species extinctions. Our model habitat is calcareous grasslands of Southeast Belgium that have suffered an important fragmentation process since the beginning of the twentieth century. We estimated that the mean extinction debt of the calcareous grassland patches was ca. 24 species, including ca. six specialist species. We showed that 16 of the 46 specialist species did not meet their area requirement anymore and were therefore considered as sensitive to extinction. However, the species composition of the more recent grasslands indicates a non-negligible recolonization potential of specialist species. There is thus a real possibility to reduce extinction risk by restoring suitable habitats. [less ▲]

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See detailPlant species extinction debt in a biodiversity hotspot: community and species approaches
Piqueray, Julien ULg; Bisteau, Emmanuelle; Cristofoli, Sara et al

Conference (2009, April)

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See detailPlant species extinction debt in a temperate biodiversity hotspot: community, species and functional traits approaches
Piqueray, Julien ULg; Bisteau, Emmanuelle; Cristofoli, Sara et al

in Biological Conservation (2011), 144

Destruction and fragmentation of (semi-) natural habitats are considered the main causes of biodiversity loss worldwide. Plant species may exhibit a slow response to fragmentation, resulting in the ... [more ▼]

Destruction and fragmentation of (semi-) natural habitats are considered the main causes of biodiversity loss worldwide. Plant species may exhibit a slow response to fragmentation, resulting in the development of an extinction debt in fragmented plant communities. The detection of extinction debt is of primary importance in habitat conservation strategies. We applied two different approaches proposed in the literature to identify extinction debt in Southeast Belgium calcareous grasslands. The first method compared species richness between stable and fragmented habitat patches. The second explored correlations between current species richness and current and past landscape configurations using multiple regression analyses. We subsequently examined results generated by both methods. In addition, we proposed techniques to identify species that are more likely to support extinction debt and associated functional traits. We estimated a respective extinction debt of approximately 28% and 35% of the total and specialist species richness. Similar results were obtained from both methods. We identified 15 threatened specialist species under the current landscape configuration. It is likely the landscape configuration no longer supports the species habitat requirements. We demonstrated that non-clonal species are most threatened, as well as taxa that cannot persist in degraded habitats and form only sparsely distributed populations. We discussed our results in light of other studies in similar habitats, and the overall implications for habitat conservation. [less ▲]

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See detailPlant Water Uptake in Drying Soils
Lobet, Guillaume ULg; Couvreur, Valentin; Meunier, Félicien et al

in Plant Physiology (2014), in press

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (3 ULg)
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See detailA plant's perspective of extremes: Terrestrial plant responses to changing climatic variability
Reyer, C.; Leuzinger, S.; Ramming, A. et al

in Global Change Biology (2013), 19

We review observational, experimental and model results on how plants respond to extreme climatic conditions induced by changing climatic variability. Distinguishing between impacts of changing mean ... [more ▼]

We review observational, experimental and model results on how plants respond to extreme climatic conditions induced by changing climatic variability. Distinguishing between impacts of changing mean climatic conditions and changing climatic variability on terrestrial ecosystems is generally underrated in current studies. The goals of our review are thus (1) to identify plant processes that are vulnerable to changes in the variability of climatic variables rather than to changes in their mean, and (2) to depict/evaluate available study designs to quantify responses of plants to changing climatic variability. We find that phenology is largely affected by changing mean climate but also that impacts of climatic variability are much less studied but potentially damaging. We note that plant water relations seem to be very vulnerable to extremes driven by changes in temperature and precipitation and that heatwaves and flooding have stronger impacts on physiological processes than changing mean climate. Moreover, interacting phenological and physiological processes are likely to further complicate plant responses to changing climatic variability. Phenological and physiological processes and their interactions culminate in even more sophisticated responses to changing mean climate and climatic variability at the species and community level. Generally, observational studies are well suited to study plant responses to changing mean climate, but less suitable to gain a mechanistic understanding of plant responses to climatic variability. Experiments seem best suited to simulate extreme events. In models, temporal resolution and model structure are crucial to capture plant responses to changing climatic variability. We highlight that a combination of experimental, observational and /or modeling studies have the potential to overcome important caveats of the respective individual approaches. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (14 ULg)