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See detailMethodology to model the energy vulnerability of households in Europe based on the current mapping of fuel poverty and transport poverty and its likely evolution until 2040
Pierson, Charlotte; Reiter, Sigrid ULg

in Proceedings of the Urban Transition Global Summit 2016 (2016)

Fuel poverty refers to a situation in which an individual or household is not able to meet their basic energy needs. Fuel poverty is currently growing in the European Union. Research in this field is ... [more ▼]

Fuel poverty refers to a situation in which an individual or household is not able to meet their basic energy needs. Fuel poverty is currently growing in the European Union. Research in this field is often limited to the assessment of the current risk of fuel poverty based on energy consumptions due to housing. Urban sprawl generates a significant increase in energy consumption related to daily mobility, which generates energy poverty related to transportation needs. This article presents a methodology for modeling the current and future energy poverty of households in Europe on the basis of energy consumptions due to housing, to daily mobility and their combination. Indicators for fuel poverty and transport poverty will be based on Hills’ method, which is widely recognized internationally for fuel poverty assessment and which takes into account two thresholds: energy expenses of households and their available residual income. This article will outline the spatial modeling process of energy costs due to dwellings and mobility thanks to the coupling of a GIS tool, cadastral datasets, existing methods for the assessment of buildings and transport energy consumptions and updated databases (EPB certificates, detailed mobility surveys, data from smart meters, mobile phones and GPS). Different scenarios will be selected to predict the evolution of fuel and transport poverty until 2040 on the basis of national and European prospective studies or, alternatively, based on the historical evaluation of some key parameters and their extrapolation. The evolution of built-up areas will be model thanks to the multinomial logistic regression model (MLR) that enables to visualize the consequence of different urban densities expansion. The different parameters that will influence the evolution of fuel and transport poverty until 2040 will be highlighted (climate change, urban expansion, fuel prices, energy performance of buildings and vehicles, etc.). [less ▲]

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See detailMethodology used for the European badger (Meles meles) monitoring in Wallonie
Schockert, Vincianne ULg; Lambinet, Clotilde ULg; Cornet, Yves ULg et al

in Lecocq, Yves (Ed.) Abstracts of 31st IUGB congress (2013, August)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (3 ULg)
See detailMethods
Richelle, Marc ULg; Lejeune, Helga ULg; Mantanus, H. et al

in Richelle, Marc; Lejeune, Helga (Eds.) Time in animal behaviour (1980)

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See detailMethods and means for metabolic engineering and improved product formation by micro-organisms
Rigali, Sébastien ULg; Titgemeyer, Fritz; van Wezel, Gilles

Patent (2007)

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See detailMethods for calculating growth velocity for VLBW infants
SENTERRE, Thibault ULg

in Pediatrics (2015), 136(1), 8469757

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See detailMethods for Estimating Areas under Receiver-Operating Characteristic Curves: Illustration with Somatic-Cell Scores in Subclinical Intramammary Infections
Detilleux, Johann ULg; Arendt, J.; Lomba, F. et al

in Preventive Veterinary Medicine (1999), 41(2-3), 75-88

The aim of this study was to demonstrate receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) methodology in the context of bovine intramammary infection (IMI). Quarter somatic cell scores (SCS) were available to ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to demonstrate receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) methodology in the context of bovine intramammary infection (IMI). Quarter somatic cell scores (SCS) were available to evaluate quarter IMI, and the final IMI diagnosis was made from milk bacteriologic cultures. Data consisted of 11,453 quarter-milk samples collected on 2084 clinically healthy cows located in 154 Belgian herds. Bacteriological analyses showed 16.2%, 7.2%, and 11.9% of quarters infected with coagulase-positive Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus agalactiae, and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp., respectively. The ROC curve indicated all the combinations of sensitivity and specificity that quarter SCS was able to provide as a test to identify quarter IMI. Among parametric, semi-parametric, and non-parametric methods to estimate area under ROC curves, the parametric method seemed the least appropriate for analyzing SCS in this study. With the non-parametric method, the total area under the ROC curves showed quarter SCS could identify quarter IMI with an overall accuracy of 69%, 76%, and 59% for coagulase-positive Staphylococcus spp., S. agalactiae, and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp., respectively. Parametric and non-parametric statistical tests showed that overall SCS diagnostic capability was significantly (p<0.01) different from chance and was different (p<0.01) across the three bacteria. However, the SCS thresholds yielding the highest percentage of quarters correctly classified as infected (for the observed prevalence and for equal costs assigned to false-positive and false-negative results) were so high that they had no practical value. The major advantage of ROC analysis is the comprehensive description of the discrimination capacity of SCS for all possible choices of critical values. The major disadvantage is the dependency upon the gold standard used for the final diagnosis--but recent improvements of the methodology will correct the problem. [less ▲]

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See detailMethods for size classification of wood chips
Hartmann, Hans; Böhm, Thorsten; Daugbjerg Jensen, Peter et al

in Biomass & Bioenergy (2006)

Methods for size classification of wood chips were analysed in an international round robin using 13 conventional wood chip samples and two specially prepared standard samples, one from wood chips and one ... [more ▼]

Methods for size classification of wood chips were analysed in an international round robin using 13 conventional wood chip samples and two specially prepared standard samples, one from wood chips and one from hog fuel. The true size distribution of these two samples (according to length, width and height) had been determined stereometrically (reference method) using a digital calliper gauge and by weighing each of the about 7000 wood particles per sample. Five different horizontal and three rotary screening devices were tested using five different screen hole diameters (3.15, 8, 16, 45, 63 mm, round holes). These systems are compared to a commercially available continuously measuring image analysis equipment. The results show that among the devices of a measuring principle—horizontal and rotary screening—the results are quite comparable, while there is a severe incompatibility when distributions are determined by different measuring principles. Highest conformity with the reference values is given for measurements with an image analysis system, whereas for all machines with horizontal screens the median value of the size distribution only reached between one-third to half of the reference median value for the particle length distribution. These deviations can be attributed to a higher particle misplacement, which is particularly found in the larger fractions. Such differences decrease when the particle’s shape is more roundish (i.e. sphericity closer to one). The median values of length distributions from screenings with a rotary classifier are between the measurements from an image analysis and horizontal screening devices. [less ▲]

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See detailMethods for the preparation of bimetallic xerogel catalysts designed for chlorinated wastes processing
Lambert, Stéphanie ULg; Ferauche, Fabrice; Heinrichs, Benoît ULg et al

in Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids (2006), 352(26-27), 2751-2762

The aim of this work is to simplify and generalize the synthesis procedure of bimetallic supported catalysts by sol-gel process. For Pd-Ag/SiO2, co-gelled xerogels catalysts a number of synthesis ... [more ▼]

The aim of this work is to simplify and generalize the synthesis procedure of bimetallic supported catalysts by sol-gel process. For Pd-Ag/SiO2, co-gelled xerogels catalysts a number of synthesis procedures were compared: use of one or two specific alkoxides able to form a chelate with palladium and/or silver cations, reagent mixing in one or two steps, use of industrial grade chemicals instead of laboratory grade chemicals. The catalysts obtained are quite similar: same metal dispersion, same tailored morphology, same localization and accessibility of Pd-Ag alloy nanoparticles inside microporous silica, same activity and selectivity for hydrodechlorination of 1,2-dichloroethane into ethylene. For catalyst production at large scale the synthesis can be achieved in one step with 3-(2-aminoethyl)aminopropyltrimethoxysilane of industrial grade as chelating alkoxide, tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) of industrial grade and ethanol denatured with diethyl phthalate. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailMethods for Vitamin D measurement - analytical problems and clinical relevance
Cavalier, Etienne ULg

Conference (2010, March 05)

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See detailMethods in social cognition research
Dardenne, Benoît ULg

Scientific conference (1992)

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See detailMethods of clinical and biological assessment of rheumatoid arthritis
Malaise, Michel ULg; Franchimont, P.

in Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology. Supplement (1987), 65

Inflammation has long been recognised as notoriously difficult to measure both in clinical practice and in the laboratory. Of all the cardinal features of inflammation, pain relief is really what the ... [more ▼]

Inflammation has long been recognised as notoriously difficult to measure both in clinical practice and in the laboratory. Of all the cardinal features of inflammation, pain relief is really what the patients want, and among disabled persons, rheumatic patients are the only ones who must cope with chronic pain. The rheumatologist, however, is also interested in other parameters that are thought to reflect improvement of the inflammatory process. The methods used to clinically assess rheumatoid arthritis (RA) should share the following four parameters: validity, sensitivity, reliability and simplicity. Unfortunately, at present, no single ideal method is capable of accurately reflecting disease activity in RA. The measurement of pain relief by the visual analogue scale, the determination of the Ritchie index and the duration of morning stiffness, plus patient assessment of global response should be enough to detect clinical activity of the drug in RA. If we are working with slow-acting drugs or so-called disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), it should be appropriate to include X-ray analysis and laboratory tests in the evaluation. A reduction in the number of fresh erosions and/or the healing of present erosions can give reliable information on the capacity of the drug to really modify the course of the disease. At present, measurement of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and of acute phase serum proteins seems to offer the best available assessment during early weeks of therapy. The other biological tests are of limited value in reflecting or predicting a beneficial clinical response to DMARDs. [less ▲]

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See detailMethods of ex vivo expansion of human cord blood cells: challenges, successes and clinical implications
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Ruggeri, A.; Nagler, A.

in Expert Review of Hematology (2016), 21

More than 40,000 unrelated cord blood transplantations (UCBT) have been performed worldwide as treatment for patients with malignant or non-malignant life threatening hematologic disorders. However, low ... [more ▼]

More than 40,000 unrelated cord blood transplantations (UCBT) have been performed worldwide as treatment for patients with malignant or non-malignant life threatening hematologic disorders. However, low absolute numbers of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) within a single cord blood unit has remained a limiting factor for this transplantation modality, particularly in adult recipients. Further, because UCB contains low numbers of mostly naïve T cells, immune recovery after UCBT is slow predisposing patients to severe infections. Other causes of UCBT failure has included graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and relapse of the underlying disease. In this article, we first review the current landscape of cord blood engineering aimed at improving engraftment. This includes approaches of UCB-HSPCs expansion and methods aimed at improving UCB-HSCPs homing. We then discuss recent approaches of cord blood engineering developed to prevent infection (generation of multivirus-specific cytotoxic T cells (VSTs) from UCB), relapse (transduction of UCB-T cells with tumor-specific chimeric receptor antigens (CARs)) and GVHD (expansion of regulatory T cells from UCB). Although many of these techniques of UCB engineering remain currently technically challenging and expensive, they are likely to revolutionize the field of UCBT in the next decades. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Methods of Managgement: An Answer to the crisis
Robert, Jocelyne ULg

Conference (2016, July 12)

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See detailMethods of sensory evaluation of odour and 50 m3 test facility at Arlon laboratory
Romain, Anne-Claude ULg; Nicolas, Jacques ULg; Degraeve, Ch

Diverse speeche and writing (2008)

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See detailMethods of sputum processing for cell counts, immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridisation
Efthimiadis, A.; Spanevello, A.; Hamid, Q. et al

in European Respiratory Journal (2002), 20(Suppl. 37), 19-23

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See detailMethods to Assess the Activation of the Alternative (Noncanonical) NF-kappaB Pathway by Non-death TNF Receptors.
Remouchamps, Caroline ULg; Dejardin, Emmanuel ULg

in NF-kappa B: Methods and Protocols (2015)

The alternative or noncanonical NF-kappaB pathway regulates the generation of p52-containing NF-kappaB dimers (e.g., p52/RelB) through a partial degradation (called processing) of the precursor p100 into ... [more ▼]

The alternative or noncanonical NF-kappaB pathway regulates the generation of p52-containing NF-kappaB dimers (e.g., p52/RelB) through a partial degradation (called processing) of the precursor p100 into p52. This pathway is activated by a subset of non-death TNF receptor members, which ultimately activate two kinases: NIK (NF-kappaB-Inducing Kinase) and IKKalpha (Inhibitor of kappaB Kinase alpha). These kinases create a phosphodegron for the E3 ligase SCF-beta-TrCP that covalently binds K48-linked polyubiquitin chain onto p100 prior to its proteasomal processing. The resulting p52-containing complexes translocate into the nucleus to activate target genes involved in secondary lymphoid organ development, B cell survival or in osteoclastogenesis.We describe in this chapter straightforward methods to monitor the activation of the alternative NF-kappaB pathway. These methods uncover cytosolic and nuclear biochemical modifications of key proteins of the alternative NF-kappaB pathway required prior to the transcription of NF-kappaB target genes. [less ▲]

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See detailMethods to Increase the Robustness of Finite-Volume Flow Models in Thermodynamic Systems
Quoilin, Sylvain ULg; Bell, Ian ULg; Desideri, Adriano ULg et al

in Energies (2014), 7(3), 1621-1640

This paper addresses the issues linked to simulation failures during integration in finite-volume flow models, especially those involving a two-phase state. This kind of model is particularly useful when ... [more ▼]

This paper addresses the issues linked to simulation failures during integration in finite-volume flow models, especially those involving a two-phase state. This kind of model is particularly useful when modeling 1D heat exchangers or piping, e.g., in thermodynamic cycles involving a phase change. Issues, such as chattering or stiff systems, can lead to low simulation speed, instabilities and simulation failures. In the particular case of two-phase flow models, they are usually linked to a discontinuity in the density derivative between the liquid and two-phase zones. In this work, several methods to tackle numerical problems are developed, described, implemented and compared. In addition, methods available in the literature are also implemented and compared to the proposed approaches. Results suggest that the robustness of the models can be significantly increased with these different methods, at the price of a small increase of the error in the mass and energy balances. [less ▲]

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See detailMethods to study protein aggregation and amyloid formation
Dumoulin, Mireille ULg; Bader, R.

in Protein & Peptide Letters (2006), 13

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (3 ULg)