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See detailLa locura como compromiso : Un Quijote actual
Francois, Jeromine ULg

E-print/Working paper (2015)

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See detailThe locus ceruleus is involved in the successful retrieval of emotional memories in humans
Sterpenich, Virginie ULg; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg et al

in Journal of Neuroscience (2006), 26(28), 7416-7423

Emotional memories are better remembered than neutral ones. The amygdala is involved in this enhancement not only by modulating the hippocampal activity, but possibly also by modulating central arousal ... [more ▼]

Emotional memories are better remembered than neutral ones. The amygdala is involved in this enhancement not only by modulating the hippocampal activity, but possibly also by modulating central arousal. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we analyzed the retrieval of neutral faces encoded in emotional or neutral contexts. The pupillary size measured during encoding was used as a modulator of brain responses during retrieval. The interaction between emotion and memory showed significant responses in a set of areas, including the amygdala and parahippocampal gyrus. These areas responded significantly more for correctly remembered faces encoded in an emotional, compared with neutral, context. The same interaction conducted on responses modulated by the pupillary size revealed an area of the dorsal tegmentum of the ponto-mesencephalic region, consistent with the locus ceruleus. Moreover, a psychophysiological interaction showed that amygdalar responses were more tightly related to those of the locus ceruleus when remembering faces that had been encoded in an emotional, rather than neutral, context. These findings suggest that the restoration of a central arousal similar to encoding takes part in the successful retrieval of neutral events learned in an emotional context. [less ▲]

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See detailLocus coeruleus syndrome as a complication of tectal surgery.
Kronenburg, Annick; Spliet, Wim G.; Broekman, Marike et al

in BMJ case reports (2015), 2015

We describe a case of a 48-year-old woman who underwent a resection of a tectal pilocytic astrocytoma complicated by a sequence of fluctuating consciousness, psychosis with complex hallucinations and ... [more ▼]

We describe a case of a 48-year-old woman who underwent a resection of a tectal pilocytic astrocytoma complicated by a sequence of fluctuating consciousness, psychosis with complex hallucinations and lasting sleeping disturbances in which she vividly acts out her dreams. Based on the clinical and anatomical evidence of this case, we propose the term locus coeruleus syndrome to describe this association of iatrogenic symptoms. Along with those of the locus coeruleus, lesions of the dorsal raphe nucleus, ventral tegmentum, substantia nigra pars compacta, the superior colliculus and other peduncular lesions (such as peduncular hallucinosis) are involved in the regulation of sleep-wake/arousal, behaviour, sleeping disorders and rapid eye movement atonia. However, iatrogenic lesion of the locus coeruleus could explain the complications on all levels in our patient. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Locus for Enterocyte Effacement (Lee) of Enteropathogenic Escherichia Coli (Epec) from Dogs and Cats
Goffaux, F.; China, B.; Janssen, L. et al

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (1999), 473

Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) produce attaching and effacing lesions. The genes responsible for this lesion are clustered on the chromosome forming a 35.5 kilobase pathogenesis island called ... [more ▼]

Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) produce attaching and effacing lesions. The genes responsible for this lesion are clustered on the chromosome forming a 35.5 kilobase pathogenesis island called LEE. The LEE was identified, characterized and completely sequenced from the human EPEC strain E2348/69. The LEE carries genes coding for: a type III secretion system (genes esc and sep), the translocated intimin receptor (gene tir), the outer membrane protein intimin (gene eae) and the E. coli secreted proteins EspA, EspB, and EspD (genes esp). In addition to man and farm animals, EPEC are also isolated from dogs and cats. We studied structurally and functionally the LEE of dog and cat EPEC. First, we used four probes scattered along the LEE to identify the presence of a LEE in canine and feline EPEC isolates. Second, by PCR, we checked the presence of genes homologous to eae, sep, esp, and tir genes in these strains. Third, since the four types of eae and tir genes were described, we developed a multiplex PCR in order to determine the type of eae and tir genes present in each strain. Fourth, we determined by PCR the site of the LEE insertion on the chromosome. Fifth, we tested several of the canine EPEC in their capacity to induce attaching and effacing lesions in the rabbit intestinal loop assay. We can conclude from this study: first, that the a LEE-like structure is present in all tested strains and that it contains genes homologous to esp, sep, tir, and eae genes; second, that there is some preferential associations between the type of eae gene and the type of tir gene present in a strain; third, that the majority of the tested strains contained a LEE located elsewhere on the chromosome in comparison to the human EPEC strain E2348/69; and fourth that dog EPEC were able to induce attaching and effacing lesions in rabbit ileal loop assay. [less ▲]

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See detailA locus for febrile seizures (FEB3) maps to chromosome 2q23-24.
Peiffer, A.; Thompson, J.; Charlier, Carole ULg et al

in Annals of Neurology (1999), 46(4), 671-8

Febrile seizures are the most common form of childhood seizures, occurring in 2% to 5% of North American children. We report a large Utah family with 21 members affected by febrile seizures inherited as ... [more ▼]

Febrile seizures are the most common form of childhood seizures, occurring in 2% to 5% of North American children. We report a large Utah family with 21 members affected by febrile seizures inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. All had generalized tonic-clonic seizures with onset associated with fever, consistent with the consensus febrile seizure phenotype, and none had febrile seizures beyond 6 years of age. Eighteen affected individuals had recurrent febrile seizures. Eight individuals developed afebrile seizures between ages 5 and 13 years. Afebrile seizures consisted of generalized tonic-clonic, generalized tonic, generalized atonic, simple partial, and partial complex seizure types and were associated with abnormal electroencephalographic findings in 5 individuals, all of whom were intellectually normal. We undertook linkage analysis in this family, defining the disease phenotype as febrile seizures alone. Linkage analysis in epilepsy candidate gene/loci regions failed to show evidence for linkage to febrile seizures. However, a genomewide scan and subsequent fine mapping revealed significant evidence for a new febrile seizure locus (FEB3) on chromosome 2q23-24 with linkage to the marker D2S2330 (LOD score 8.08 at theta = 0.001). Haplotype analysis defined a critical 10-cM region between markers D2S141 and D2S2345 that contains the FEB3 locus. [less ▲]

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See detailLocusts and Grasshoppers: Future Foods?
Paul, Aman ULg; Frederich, Michel ULg; Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULg et al

Scientific conference (2014, May 08)

Consuming locusts and grasshoppers as food is not a new concept, because some people have been doing it for a long time and there are many references in the religious literature to support this. About 80 ... [more ▼]

Consuming locusts and grasshoppers as food is not a new concept, because some people have been doing it for a long time and there are many references in the religious literature to support this. About 80 locust and grasshopper species are consumed worldwide, and the large majority of grasshopper species are edible. From the nutritional point of view they are an excellent source of proteins, lipids and other minor components like vitamins and minerals. They are an excellent source of amino acids and their lipids contain a large majority of unsaturated fatty acids. Environmentalists have supported human consumption of grasshoppers owing to the facts that they usually appear as pests. Using them as food could help reduce their population and result in limited application of harmful pesticides. Their production usually generates lesser amount of greenhouse gases & ammonia; a lower amount of water is required for their production in comparison to conventional proteins sources. Some species of grasshoppers usually feed on dead organic matter, this reduces the environmental load. In the developing world, catching of grasshoppers and selling them for human consumption has played a key role in improving the livelihood of women and underprivileged children. Eating grasshopper and locust is not a very common practice in temperate areas. However it is a very common practice in the tropical areas of world because of the higher density, bigger size of the insect and yearlong availability in such areas. To encourage their consumption in temperate areas, it is now necessary to perform accurate research regarding food safety (minor components, toxicity, allergens,…) but also to develop value added products to make it easier for people to adapt with entomophagy. Furthermore we have to develop methods for commercial production and organize awareness campaigns to explain about the nutritional and other benefits related to locust & grasshopper consumption as food to people. [less ▲]

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See detailLocutifs et énoncés non verbaux en ancien français
Mazziotta, Nicolas ULg

Conference (2017, February 02)

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See detailLoczy, une référence pour une réflexion sur les conditions d'accueil de qualité
Pirard, Florence ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2008)

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See detailLe log book :un support d'apprentissage, d'accompagnement et d'évaluation des compétences professionnelles
VIERSET, Viviane ULg

in Bulletin de l'ADMEE-Europe (2013)

Développement pratico-pratique de l'usage du log book comme support d'une posture réflexive.

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See detailLog jam effect on bed-load mobility from experiments conducted in a small gravel-bed channel
Assani, Ali; Petit, François ULg

in Memorial symposium Pro. J. De Ploey Experimental geomorphology and landscape ecosystem changes (1993)

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See detailA logarithmic commensurability theorem for a class of GDIFSs
Leroy, Julien ULg

Poster (2015, September)

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See detailDe logboeken van Columbus: het woord, de tolk en de vertaler
Vanden Berghe, Kristine ULg

in KVH (Ed.) De weg waaraan gewerkt wordt: huldeboek aan Rik van Leuven opgedragen bij zijn afscheid als algemeen-directeur van de Katholieke Vlaamse Hogeschool (1998)

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See detailLe logement du cheval: implications en termes de bien-être et d’éthique
Mikaeloff, Camille ULg; Vandenheede, Marc ULg; Vandenput, Sandrina ULg

in 42ème Journée de la Recherche Équine "Bien-être des équidés" (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (1 ULg)