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Peer Reviewed
See detailPit-1 polymorphisms and milk production parameters in Italian-Frisian bulls
Parmentier, isabelle; Gengler, Nicolas ULg; Mortiaux, Frédéric et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (1998), 2(special issue), 3

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailPit-1, a candidate gene for MAS in dairy bulls.
Parmentier, Isabelle; Gengler, Nicolas ULg; Fontaine, Sandrine et al

Poster (2001, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailPIT-1, a candidate gene for mass assisted selection in dairy bulls.
Parmentier, Isabelle; Gengler, Nicolas ULg; Fontaine, S. et al

in Journal of Animal Science (2001), 79(Suppl 1, N°1412), 340

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailPit-I and other somatotrope candidate genes to optimize selection for milk traits in bovine species: the 21 century's strategy.
Parmentier, Isabelle; Gillard, Nathalie; Abras, Sven et al

Poster (2003, February)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)
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See detailPitch analysis workshop
Larrouy, Pauline ULg

Conference (2013, August 13)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (7 ULg)
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Peer Reviewed
See detailPitch fluctuations in accurate and inaccurate singers: are they the same?
Larrouy, Pauline ULg; Pfordresher, Peter Q

Conference (2014, June 28)

The research presented here attempts to explore the fine-control of pitch during singing among accurate occasional singers and individuals whose singing reflects a Vocal Pitch Imitation Deficit (VPID ... [more ▼]

The research presented here attempts to explore the fine-control of pitch during singing among accurate occasional singers and individuals whose singing reflects a Vocal Pitch Imitation Deficit (VPID). Most past research addresses individual differences at the level of entire sung notes or melodies. By contrast, in the present research we addressed whether VPID singers differ from accurate singers with respect to the way to reach, maintain, and stop a sung tone. In order to describe the “scoops” at the beginning and ends of tone, as well as other forms of instability, we adapted the model of Large et al. (2002), originally designed to model entrainment of timing during synchronization. This model was applied to 1461 notes performed by 12 VPID and 17 accurate singers from the database of Pfordresher and Mantell (2014). Finally, the parameter values across the VPID and accurate singers were compared. The results showed that the model fits tones performed by accurate and VPID singers similarly well. As expected, the median pitch across the entire sung note deviated from the target to imitate for VPID singers; at the same time, the proportion of these deviations that were overshoots (“sharp”) versus undershoots (“flat”) were the same for VPID and accurate singers (2/3rd under and 1/3rd above). Thus accurate and VPID singers differ in the magnitude but not the type of overall deviation they exhibit. Whereas no difference occurred between the singers regarding the direction of the scoop (up or down) at the start and the end of the tone, the amplitude of the scoops was significantly different between VPID and accurate singers. The present study highlights the difficulty of VPID singers to reach and stop a sung tone, which supports the hypothesis of a fine motor control deficit in this population. Furthermore, the pitch fluctuations described by the model would have to be investigated in research on pitch accuracy perception. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailPitch matching, melodic singing, and vocal-motor control
Hutchins, Sean; Larrouy, Pauline ULg; Peretz, Isabelle

Conference (2013, August 08)

Poor singing ability can be caused by poor pitch perception or by poor vocal-motor control. Many prior studies have tried to examine this relationship, but one factor that often fails to be taken into ... [more ▼]

Poor singing ability can be caused by poor pitch perception or by poor vocal-motor control. Many prior studies have tried to examine this relationship, but one factor that often fails to be taken into account is the timbre of the target to be matched. Here, we compare accuracy in instrumental and vocal pitch matching paradigms, designed such that each participant’s own voice serves as both the target and the response. Participants (nonmusicians) matched their previously recorded voice on a slider, designed to play back their voice at different pitch levels depending on the location of a finger press on a continuous dimension. They also matched single pitches with their voice, and sang a familiar melody (“Happy Birthday”) for comparison to the single pitch matching tasks. The nonmusicians were significantly better at instrumental pitch matching than vocal pitch matching, indicating that vocal-motor control is an important limiting factor on singing ability. There were significant correlations between the melodic singing ability and vocal pitch matching, but not instrumental pitch matching. People with higher quality voices tended to be more accurate with pitch in melodies. These results demonstrate that single pitch matching tasks can be useful in measuring general singing abilities, and further confirm the importance of vocal-motor control in determining singing ability. [less ▲]

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See detailPitted keratolysis: new ultrastructural insight in keratohyalin granule and corneodesmosome alterations.
Hermanns-Lê, Trinh ULg; Garcia, R.; Arrese Estrada, Jean-Marie ULg et al

in Exogenous Dermatology : Physical, Chemical, Biological (2004), 3

Background: Pitted keratolysis (PK) is a superficial cutaneous infection caused by different species of bacteria. It is characterized by discrete crateriform and malodorous pits and erosions coalescing to ... [more ▼]

Background: Pitted keratolysis (PK) is a superficial cutaneous infection caused by different species of bacteria. It is characterized by discrete crateriform and malodorous pits and erosions coalescing to form bizarre figures on the soles. Objective: To investigate the process of corneocyte shedding in PK. Method: Biopsies from typical lesions of three patients were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Results: Microorganisms were found both inter- and intracellularly in corneocytes and keratinocytes of the upper layers of the stratum spinosum. Bacteria exhibited different morphologic aspects related to their localisation in the epidermis. Keratohyalin granules were strikingly abnormal, showing sharp segregation between rounded dense areas and more electron-translucent areas. Some keratohyalin granules exhibited only alveolar dense areas. These altered keratohyalin granules were still present inside corneocytes. The corneodesmosomes at the bottom of the pits were in part cleaved leading to partial corneocyte dissociation. Conclusion: It is suggested that proteases secreted by the bacteria alter the structure of both the corneodesmosomes and the keratohyalin granules. The latter appeared more resistant to the normal processing of profilaggrin inside the corneocytes. [less ▲]

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Peer Reviewed
See detailPituicyte stellation is prevented by RhoA-or Cdc42-dependent actin polymerization.
Rosso, Lia; Pierson, Patricia M; Golfier, Claire et al

in Cellular & Molecular Neurobiology (2007), 27(6), 791-804

Our aim was to shed light on different steps leading from metabotropic receptor activation to changes in cell shape, such as those that characterize the morphological plasticity of neurohypophysial ... [more ▼]

Our aim was to shed light on different steps leading from metabotropic receptor activation to changes in cell shape, such as those that characterize the morphological plasticity of neurohypophysial astrocytes (pituicytes). Using explant cultures of adult rat pituicytes, we have previously established that adenosine A1 receptor activation induces stellation via inhibition of RhoA monomeric GTPase and subsequent disruption of actin stress fibers. Here, we rule out RhoA phosphorylation as a mechanism for that inhibition. Rather, our results are more consistent with involvement of a GTPase-activating protein (GAP). siRNA and pull-down experiments suggest that a step downstream of RhoA might involve Cdc42, another GTPase of the Rho family. However, RhoA activation, e.g., in the presence of serum, induces stress fibers, whereas direct Cdc42 activation appears to confine actin within a submembrane - i.e., cortical - network, which also prevents stellation. Therefore, we propose that RhoA may activate Cdc42 in parallel with an effector, such as p160Rho-kinase, that induces and maintains actin stress fibers in a dominant fashion. Rac1 is not involved in the stellation process per se but appears to induce a dendritogenic effect. Ultimately, it may be stated that pituicyte stellation is inducible upon mere actin depolymerization, and preventable upon actin organization, be it in the form of stress fibers or in a cortical configuration. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (1 ULg)
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See detailPituitary Adenomas
Beckers, Albert ULg; Beckers, Albert ULg

Textual, factual or bibliographical database (2002)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (2 ULg)
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See detailPituitary Adenomas
Beckers, Albert ULg; Beckers, Albert ULg

Textual, factual or bibliographical database (2007)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)
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See detailPituitary Adenomas
Beckers, Albert ULg; Beckers, Albert ULg

Textual, factual or bibliographical database (2001)

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (0 ULg)
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See detailPituitary Adenomas
Beckers, Albert ULg; Beckers, Albert ULg

Textual, factual or bibliographical database (2003)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 ULg)
See detailPituitary Adenomas : Preoperative treatment of acromegaly
Beckers, Albert ULg

Scientific conference (2000, November 11)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
See detailPituitary adenomas : The underestimated prevalence
Beckers, Albert ULg

Scientific conference (2007, October 27)

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (0 ULg)
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Peer Reviewed
See detailPituitary adenomas in young patients : when should we consider a genetic predisposition ?
Jaffrain-Rea, M. L.; Tichomirova, M.; Daly, A. F. et al

in Expert Review of Endocrinology & Metabolism (2009), 4(6), 529-531

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (3 ULg)
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See detailPituitary disease in MEN type 1 (MEN1): Data from the France-Belgium MEN1 multicenter study
Vergès, B.; Boureille, F.; Goudet, P. et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (2002), 87(2), 457-465

To date, data on pituitary adenomas in MEN type 1 (MEN1) still have to be evaluated. We analyzed the data of a large series of 324 MEN1 patients from a French and Belgian multicenter study. Data on ... [more ▼]

To date, data on pituitary adenomas in MEN type 1 (MEN1) still have to be evaluated. We analyzed the data of a large series of 324 MEN1 patients from a French and Belgian multicenter study. Data on pituitary disease were compared with those from 110 non-MEN1 patients with pituitary adenomas, matched for age, year of diagnosis, and follow-up period. Genetic analysis of the MEN1 gene was performed in 197 of the MEN1 patients. In our MEN1 series, pituitary disease occurred in 136 of 324 (42%), less frequently than hyperparathyroidism (95%, P < 0.001) and endocrine enteropancreatic tumors (54%, P < 0.01). Mean age of onset of pituitary tumors was 38.0 +/- 15.3 yr (range, 12-83 yr). Pituitary disease was associated with hyperparathyroidism in 90%. of cases, with enteropancreatic tumors in 47%, with adrenal tumors in 16%, and with thoracic neuroendocrine tumors in 4%. Pituitary disease was the initial lesion of MEN1 in 17% of all MEN1 patients. MEN1 pituitary adenomas were significantly more frequent in women than in men (50% vs. 31%,P < 0.001). Among the 136 pituitary adenomas, there were 85 prolactinomas and 12 GH-secreting, 6 ACTH-secreting, 13 cosecreting, and 20 nonsecreting tumors. Eighty-five percent of MEN1-related pituitary lesions were macroadenomas (vs. 42% in non-MEN1 patients, P < 0.001), including 32% of invasive cases. Among secreting adenomas, hormonal hypersecretion was normalized, after treatment, in only 42% (vs. 90% in non-MEN1 patients, P < 0.001), with a median follow-up of 11.4 yr. No correlation was found between the type of MEN1 germ-line mutation and the presence or absence of pituitary adenoma. Our study, based on a large group of MEN1 patients, shows that pituitary adenomas occur in 42% of the cases and are characterized by a larger size and a more aggressive presentation than without MEN1. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 71 (4 ULg)
See detailPituitary Diseases in Daily Clinical Pratice : Prevalence and Relevance 2006
Jaffrain-Réa, M. L.; Valle, L.; Daly, Adrian ULg et al

in Congrès Italien d'Endocrinologie : Florence, 2006 (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
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See detailPituitary gland in MEN1 syndrome : from histopathology to prognosis
Villa, C; Bernier, M; Gaillard, S et al

in Abstract book - 14th International Workshop on Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia and other rare endocrine tumors (2014, September)

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See detailPituitary incidentaloma : An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline
Freda, Pamela; Beckers, Albert ULg; Katznelson, Laurence et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 147 (7 ULg)