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See detailAURA validation by the baloon-borne MkIV Interferometer.
Toon, G. C.; Kleinboehl, A.; Salawitch, R. J. et al

Scientific conference (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
See detailAuralias
Leclercq, Pierre ULg; Stevens, Benjamin ULg; Demaret, Jean-Noël ULg et al

Software (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (20 ULg)
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See detailAURALIAS: an audio-immersive system for auralizing room acoustics projects
Embrechts, Jean-Jacques ULg

Conference (2011, December)

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See detailAuralization in Room Acoustics using Directional Impulse Responses Computed by Sound Ray Techniques
Embrechts, Jean-Jacques ULg; Werner, Nicolas; Lesoinne, Stéphane ULg

in Proceedings of the 4th Forum Acusticum Congress (2005)

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See detailThe Aurignacian in Eastern Europe
Noiret, Pierre ULg

in Anatolia (2005), 29

In Eastern Europe, a few sites have yielded industries attributed to the Early Aurignacian between 33,000 and 29.000 BP, characterized by bladelet production from bladelet cores and/or from carinated core ... [more ▼]

In Eastern Europe, a few sites have yielded industries attributed to the Early Aurignacian between 33,000 and 29.000 BP, characterized by bladelet production from bladelet cores and/or from carinated core-tools. These industries have affinities with other local industries south of the expansion zone of this Early Aurignacian, but problems with relative and absolute chronologies currently prevented a satisfactory "historical" interpretation of the Aurignacian phenomenon. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Aurignacian in the Zagros Region: new research at Yafteh Cave, Lorestan, Iran
Otte, Marcel ULg; Biglari, Fereidoun; Flas, Damien ULg et al

in Antiquity (2007), 81(311), 82-96

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See detailL'Aurignacien de Siuren I (Crimée): fouilles 1994-1995
Otte, Marcel ULg; Noiret, Pierre ULg; Tatartsev, Serguei et al

in Montet-White, Anta; Palma di Cesnola, Arturo; Valoch, Karel (Eds.) The Upper Palaeolithic. Colloquium XI: The Late Aurignacian (1996)

New excavations undertaken in Siuren I shelter add to our knowledge on Eastern Aurignacian dispersal.

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See detailL'Aurignacien de Siuren I (Crimée, Ukraine)
Otte, Marcel ULg; Noiret, Pierre ULg; Tatartsev, Serguei et al

in Anthropologica et Praehistorica : Bulletin de la Société Royale Belge d'Anthropologie et de Préhistoire (1996), 107

New excavations at Siuren I allowed to control the stratigraphy of the site, to give radiometric dating to the two main layers encountered and to reevaluate the lithic and faunal materials. The new dates ... [more ▼]

New excavations at Siuren I allowed to control the stratigraphy of the site, to give radiometric dating to the two main layers encountered and to reevaluate the lithic and faunal materials. The new dates show that a real Aurignacian is present at Siuren I around 28000-29000 BP. These occupations were probably a late extension of this culture through Eastern Europe. [less ▲]

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See detailAurora : Global features
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg

Conference (2011, July)

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See detailAurora at Earth, Jupiter and Saturn: a comparative view
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg

Conference (2009, August)

The interaction of the solar wind with the magnetospheres of the giant planets is different from that with the terrestrial magnetosphere in several respects bearing consequences on the morphology and ... [more ▼]

The interaction of the solar wind with the magnetospheres of the giant planets is different from that with the terrestrial magnetosphere in several respects bearing consequences on the morphology and dynamics of the aurora: - the magnetospheres of the outer planets are dominated by the planetary rotation that can provide much of the energy for the processes acting within these magnetospheres. - the circulation of plasma may be driven by mass loading of the giant magnetospheres by moons and rings rather than by reconnection with the IMF. - the magnitude and orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field plays a key role in controlling the Earth’s auroral dynamics whereas the solar wind dynamic pressure appears as a key factor in triggering auroral intensification on Saturn. - The combination of imaging and spectral techniques indicates the characteristic energy of the auroral electrons is comparable on Earth and Saturn, but higher energies are associated with the Jovian aurora. As a consequence, Jupiter’s aurora appears relatively shielded from solar wind influences, except inside the auroral oval where transient bright emission has been observed following sudden compressions of the magnetosphere. The size and brightness of the main oval shows only a week dependence on solar wind conditions. By contrast, Saturn’s aurora is quite responsive to solar wind perturbations, as was observed during campaigns of concurrent observations between HST and Cassini. Auroral intensification events that are reminiscent of shock-induced Earth aurora appear to be triggered by sudden increases of the solar dynamic pressure more than by changes in the IMF orientation. However, simultaneous HST-Cassini observations indicate that localised auroral brightenings and ENA acceleration events may be observed under quiet solar wind conditions. The occurrence of substorms is a key characteristics of the Earth’s auroral dynamics. Localized auroral enhancements have also been observed on Jupiter and Saturn. They have been associated to reconnection events causing events similar to substorms. [less ▲]

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See detailThe aurora of giant planets: 20 years of observations with the Hubble Space Telescope
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg

Scientific conference (2013, May)

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See detailAurorae at Jupiter: a selection of recent results
Bonfond, Bertrand ULg

Scientific conference (2013, December 17)

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See detailAurorae at Jupiter: Recent Findings
Bonfond, Bertrand ULg

Scientific conference (2013, April 30)

In this seminar I review the recent results concerning the aurora at Jupiter, based on Hubble Space Telescope Far-UV images.

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See detailThe auroral and ionospheric flow signatures of dual lobe reconnection
Imber, S. M.; Milan, S. E.; Hubert, Benoît ULg

in Annales Geophysicae (2006), 24(11), 3115-3129

We present the first substantial evidence for the occurrence of dual lobe reconnection from ionospheric flows and auroral signatures. The process of dual lobe reconnection refers to an interplanetary ... [more ▼]

We present the first substantial evidence for the occurrence of dual lobe reconnection from ionospheric flows and auroral signatures. The process of dual lobe reconnection refers to an interplanetary magnetic field line reconnecting with lobe field lines in both the northern and southern hemispheres. Two bursts of sunward plasma flow across the noon portion of the open/closed field line boundary (OCB), indicating magnetic flux closure at the dayside, were observed in SuperDARN radar data during a period of strongly northward IMF. The OCB is identified from spacecraft, radar backscatter, and auroral observations. In order for dual lobe reconnection to take place, we estimate that the interplanetary magnetic field clock angle must be within +/- 10 degrees of zero (North). The total flux crossing the OCB during each burst is small (1.8% and 0.6% of the flux contained within the polar cap for the two flows). A brightening of the noon portion of the northern auroral oval was observed as the clock angle passed through zero, and is thought to be due to enhanced precipitating particle fluxes due to the occurrence of reconnection at two locations along the field line. The number of solar wind protons captured by the flux closure process was estimated to be similar to 2.5 x 10(30) (4 tonnes by mass), sufficient to populate the cold, dense plasma sheet observed following this interval. [less ▲]

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See detailAuroral and Non-auroral X-ray Emissions from Jupiter: A Comparative View
Bhardwaj, A.; Elsner, R.; Gladstone, R. et al

Poster (2004)

Jovian X-rays can be broadly classified into two categories: (1) "auroral" emission, which is confined to high-latitudes ( ˜>60° ) at both polar regions, and (2) "dayglow" emission, which originates from ... [more ▼]

Jovian X-rays can be broadly classified into two categories: (1) "auroral" emission, which is confined to high-latitudes ( ˜>60° ) at both polar regions, and (2) "dayglow" emission, which originates from the sunlit low-latitude ( ˜<50° ) regions of the disk (hereafter called "disk" emissions). Recent X-ray observations of Jupiter by Chandra and XMM-Newton have shown that these two types of X-ray emission from Jupiter have different morphological, temporal, and spectral characteristics. In particular: 1) contrary to the auroral X-rays, which are concentrated in a spot in the north and in a band that runs half-way across the planet in the south, the low-latitude X-ray disk is almost uniform; 2) unlike the ˜40±20-min periodic oscillations seen in the auroral X-ray emissions, the disk emissions do not show any periodic oscillations; 3) the disk emission is harder and extends to higher energies than the auroral spectrum; and 4) the disk X-ray emission show time variability similar to that seen in solar X-rays. These differences and features imply that the processes producing X-rays are different at these two latitude regions on Jupiter. We will present the details of these and other features that suggest the differences between these two classes of X-ray emissions from Jupiter, and discuss the current scenario of the production mechanism of them. [less ▲]

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See detailAuroral counterpart of magnet ic dipolarizations in Saturn’s tail
Jackman, Caitriona; Achilleos, Nicholas; Cowley, Stan et al

Poster (2012, September 27)

Following magnetic reconnection in a planetary magnetotail, newly closed field lines can be rapidly accelerated back towards the planet, becoming “dipolarized” in the process. At Saturn, dipolarizations ... [more ▼]

Following magnetic reconnection in a planetary magnetotail, newly closed field lines can be rapidly accelerated back towards the planet, becoming “dipolarized” in the process. At Saturn, dipolarizations are initially identified in magnetometer data by looking for a southward turning of the magnetic field, indicating the transition from a radially stretched configuration to a more dipolar field topology. The highly stretched geometry of the kronian magnetotail lobes gives rise to a tail current which flows eastward (dusk to dawn) in the near equatorial plane across the centre of the tail. During reconnection and associated dipolarization of the field, the inner edge of this tail current can be diverted through the ionosphere, in a situation analogous to the substorm current wedge picture at Earth. We present a picture of the current circuit arising from this tail reconfiguration, and outline the equations which govern the field- current relationship. We show the first in situ example of a dipolarization identified in the Cassini magnetometer data and use this formalism to estimate the ionospheric current density that would arise for this example and the implications for auroral electron acceleration in regions of upward directed field-aligned current. We then present a separate example of data from the Cassini UVIS instrument where we observe small ‘spots’ of auroral emission lying near the main oval; features suggested to be associated with dipolarizations in the tail. In the example shown, such auroral features are the precursor to more intense activity associated with recurrent energisation via particle injections from the tail following reconnection. [less ▲]

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