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See detailAn O(1) Method for Wave Scattering Problems
Geuzaine, Christophe ULg

Scientific conference (2004, March 26)

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See detailAn O(1) Solver for Electromagnetic Scattering
Geuzaine, Christophe ULg

Scientific conference (2004, February 26)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)
See detailAn O(1) Solver for the Helmholtz Equation
Geuzaine, Christophe ULg

Scientific conference (2004, April 29)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)
See detailAn O(1) Solver for the Helmholtz Equation
Geuzaine, Christophe ULg

Scientific conference (2005, January 31)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (1 ULg)
See detailAn O(1) Solver for the Helmholtz Equation
Geuzaine, Christophe ULg

Scientific conference (2005, February 09)

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See detailAn O(1) Solver for the Helmholtz Equation
Geuzaine, Christophe ULg

Scientific conference (2005, November 04)

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See detailThe O+ and N+ Formation by low-energy Electron Impact on Nitrous Oxide.
Olivier, J. L.; Locht, Robert ULg; Momigny, J.

in Eichler, J.; Fritsch, W.; Hertel, I. V. (Eds.) et al Electronic and Atomic Collisions: abstracts of contributed papers. (1983)

The O+ and N+ dissociation channels in N2O have been investigated by electroionization using ion kinetic energy and mass analysis. Appearance enegies are measured as a function of the translational energy ... [more ▼]

The O+ and N+ dissociation channels in N2O have been investigated by electroionization using ion kinetic energy and mass analysis. Appearance enegies are measured as a function of the translational energy of the fragment ions. The different dissociation mechanisms are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailO-ARM Symposium
Martin, Didier ULg

Conference (2008, November 14)

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (2 ULg)
See detailO. Decroly et la recherche en éducation aujourd'hui
de Landsheere, Gilbert ULg

Learning material (1974)

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See detailO157:H7 and O104:H4 Vero/Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli outbreaks: respective role of cattle and humans
Piérard, D; De Greve, H; Haesebrouck, F et al

in Veterinary Research (2012), 43

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See detailO2/Ar and CH4 measurements in sea ice : clues for the key status of sea ice in the climate system
Zhou, Jiayun; Tison, Jean-Louis; Eicken, Hajo et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2011, April 08), 13

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See detailO2: Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde in symbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium) from reef-building corals
Roberty, Stéphane ULg

Doctoral thesis (2013)

Coral reefs are among the most beautiful and complex of all ecosystems on Earth. Although they cover less than 1% of the world’s oceans area, this marine ecosystem harbors a huge biodiversity and is vital ... [more ▼]

Coral reefs are among the most beautiful and complex of all ecosystems on Earth. Although they cover less than 1% of the world’s oceans area, this marine ecosystem harbors a huge biodiversity and is vital to human society and industries. The foundation of coral reefs relies on the fragile mutualistic relationship between reef-building corals and their photosynthetic dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium. However, this symbiosis is highly sensitive to environmental or anthropogenic disturbances and may be disrupted, thus leading to the coral bleaching phenomenon. It has been reported that the initial steps of this process are linked to photosynthesis and the antioxidant network in Symbiodinium. However the nature of the cellular mechanisms leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species and to the disruption of the symbiosis is not completely unraveled. Therefore, this study aimed to highlight the existence of photosynthetic alternative electron flows reducing molecular oxygen and the way by which they can induces an oxidative stress, in four Symbiodinium strains belonging to three different clades. Joint measurements of oxygen evolution, PSI and PSII activities by chlorophyll a fluorescence and spectrophotometric measurements allowed us to demonstrate that photoreduction of oxygen by the so-called Mehler reaction is the main electron sink at the onset of photosynthesis and during steady state photosynthesis. When Symbiodinium cells were exposed to high light conditions, the Mehler reaction and the ascorbate-glutathione cycle (water-water cycle) acted as a safety valve and drained up to 50% of the electrons from PSII, protecting it from photoinhibition and dissipating rapidly the excess photon energy by downregulation of PSII. As long as the WWC efficiency was maintained in the chloroplasts of Symbiodinium, ROS generated as a by-product of the Mehler reaction did not significantly damage target molecules and induced an acclimatory response through up-regulation of enzymes involved in the antioxidant response (superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase). Nevertheless, when cells were exposed to light stress and elevated temperature (33°C), the WWC supported 75% of the electrons coming from PSII. This increase generated twice more H2O2 than during the treatment at 26°C and resulted in the inactivation of target enzymes of the WWC. Therefore, this means that under these conditions the photoprotective functions of the WWC can no longer be maintained, thus opening the way to ROS accumulation and to the induction of coral bleaching.We found that the response to oxidative stress differed between and within Symbiodinium clades. Symbiodinium clade A was less sensitive to the chemical induced oxidative stress than the others investigated strains. These variations are most likely related to their geographic origin, their thermal history, as well as to their physiological adaptations to the local environment. They may contribute to the explanation of why coral colonies and coral species have been found to differ in their susceptibilities to bleach. However, although the antioxidant response differs to some extent, some common traits were conserved. Among them, Diatoxanthin, a xanthophyll pigment involved in the non-photochemical quenching process could also have an antioxidant function. In addition, it seems that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is involved in the antioxidant response by eliminating carbonylated protein. [less ▲]

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See detailOA à l’Université de Liège : le pari d’ORBi
Rentier, Bernard ULg; Thirion, Paul ULg

Scientific conference (2012, October 23)

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See detailOA at Liège University : the ORBi gamble
Rentier, Bernard ULg; Thirion, Paul ULg

Scientific conference (2012, October 22)

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See detailOak barks as raw materials for the extraction of polyphenols for the chemical and pharmaceutical sectors: a regional case study
Dedrie, Maxime; Jacquet, Nicolas ULg; Bombeck, Pierre-Louis ULg et al

in Industrial Crops and Products (2015), 70

Despite their potential for chemical recycling, residues from forest harvesting and wood processing are mostly used for industrial applications with low added value (energy, paper pulp, panels). Bark of ... [more ▼]

Despite their potential for chemical recycling, residues from forest harvesting and wood processing are mostly used for industrial applications with low added value (energy, paper pulp, panels). Bark of both oak species, Quercus robur L. 1753, Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl. 1784 is a by-product from sawmill and pulp mill activities. Bark is mainly used as a fuel for the same wood plants. The aim of this study is to look at the feasibility of enhancing the value of this material through the extraction of bioactive molecules such as polyphenols (i.e. catechin, gallic and ellagic acids). First, the effect of industrial storage of logs and bark on their polyphenol content was explored. Then, referring to the selection of tan oaks in the past, the question of an optimum harvesting age is addressed in order to maximize the polyphenol content of the barks. In the end, molecular diversity of bark is examined through the identification of molecules of interest, using different chromatographic analyses. The results show an effect of the industrial context and an effect of the raw material age on the chemical properties of the bark. First investigations also highlight molecules of interest and the molecular diversity, which needs to be further explored. [less ▲]

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See detailOARSI guidelines for the non-surgical management of knee osteoarthritis
McAlindon; Henrotin, Yves ULg

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2014), 22(3), 363-388

This paper presents concise, up-to-date, patient-focused, evidence-based, expert consensus guidelines for the management of knee osteoarthritis, intended to inform patients, physicians and allied ... [more ▼]

This paper presents concise, up-to-date, patient-focused, evidence-based, expert consensus guidelines for the management of knee osteoarthritis, intended to inform patients, physicians and allied healthcare professionnal worlwide. [less ▲]

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See detailOARSI recommendations on knee and hip osteoarthritis: use with discernment.
Chevalier, Xavier; Henrotin, Yves ULg

in Joint Bone Spine (2009), 76(5), 455-7

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See detailOARSI recommended performance-based tests to assess clinical function in osteoathritis of hip and knee: author's reply
Dobson, Flora; Henrotin, Yves ULg

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2013), 21(10), 1625-1626

The OARSI recommended set of performance-based tests of physical function represents the tests of typical activities relevant to individuals diagnosed with hip or knee OA and following joint replacements ... [more ▼]

The OARSI recommended set of performance-based tests of physical function represents the tests of typical activities relevant to individuals diagnosed with hip or knee OA and following joint replacements. These tests are complementary to patient-reported measures and are recommended as prospective outcome measures in future OA research and to assist decision-making in clinical practice. Further research should be directed to expanding the measurement-property evidence of the recommended tests. [less ▲]

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