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See detailPlant selection for nest building by western lowland gorillas in Cameroon
Willie, Jacob; Tagg, Nikki; Petre, Charles-Albert ULg et al

in Primates : Journal of Primatology (2014)

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See detailPlant species extinction debt in a biodiversity hotspot: community and species approaches
Piqueray, Julien ULg; Bisteau, Emmanuelle ULg; Cristofoli, Sara ULg et al

in Belgian Journal of Botany (2008), 141(2), 189

Destruction and fragmentation of natural and semi-natural habitats are considered as major threats for plant species richness. However, the response of plant species richness to habitat alteration is ... [more ▼]

Destruction and fragmentation of natural and semi-natural habitats are considered as major threats for plant species richness. However, the response of plant species richness to habitat alteration is sometimes delayed. This delay induces an extinction debt in plant communities that are thus prone to undergo species extinctions in the following years. Several methodologies were proposed to detect this extinction debt and estimate the mean number of species yet to disappear. In this study, we developed a new methodology for the estimation of the extinction debt extent. Moreover, we proposed a species approach aimed at determining which species are more sensitive to extinction as a consequence of habitat destruction and fragmentation. Finally, we explored the colonization ability of habitat specialist species. This aspect is of fi rst importance to counteract local species extinctions. Our model habitat is calcareous grasslands of Southeast Belgium that have suffered an important fragmentation process since the beginning of the twentieth century. We estimated that the mean extinction debt of the calcareous grassland patches was ca. 24 species, including ca. six specialist species. We showed that 16 of the 46 specialist species did not meet their area requirement anymore and were therefore considered as sensitive to extinction. However, the species composition of the more recent grasslands indicates a non-negligible recolonization potential of specialist species. There is thus a real possibility to reduce extinction risk by restoring suitable habitats. [less ▲]

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See detailPlant species extinction debt in a biodiversity hotspot: community and species approaches
Piqueray, Julien ULg; Bisteau, Emmanuelle; Cristofoli, Sara et al

Conference (2009, April)

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See detailPlant species extinction debt in a temperate biodiversity hotspot: community, species and functional traits approaches
Piqueray, Julien ULg; Bisteau, Emmanuelle; Cristofoli, Sara et al

in Biological Conservation (2011), 144

Destruction and fragmentation of (semi-) natural habitats are considered the main causes of biodiversity loss worldwide. Plant species may exhibit a slow response to fragmentation, resulting in the ... [more ▼]

Destruction and fragmentation of (semi-) natural habitats are considered the main causes of biodiversity loss worldwide. Plant species may exhibit a slow response to fragmentation, resulting in the development of an extinction debt in fragmented plant communities. The detection of extinction debt is of primary importance in habitat conservation strategies. We applied two different approaches proposed in the literature to identify extinction debt in Southeast Belgium calcareous grasslands. The first method compared species richness between stable and fragmented habitat patches. The second explored correlations between current species richness and current and past landscape configurations using multiple regression analyses. We subsequently examined results generated by both methods. In addition, we proposed techniques to identify species that are more likely to support extinction debt and associated functional traits. We estimated a respective extinction debt of approximately 28% and 35% of the total and specialist species richness. Similar results were obtained from both methods. We identified 15 threatened specialist species under the current landscape configuration. It is likely the landscape configuration no longer supports the species habitat requirements. We demonstrated that non-clonal species are most threatened, as well as taxa that cannot persist in degraded habitats and form only sparsely distributed populations. We discussed our results in light of other studies in similar habitats, and the overall implications for habitat conservation. [less ▲]

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See detailPlant Water Uptake in Drying Soils
Lobet, Guillaume ULg; Couvreur, Valentin; Meunier, Félicien et al

in Plant Physiology (2014), in press

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See detailA plant's perspective of extremes: Terrestrial plant responses to changing climatic variability
Reyer, C.; Leuzinger, S.; Ramming, A. et al

in Global Change Biology (2013), 19

We review observational, experimental and model results on how plants respond to extreme climatic conditions induced by changing climatic variability. Distinguishing between impacts of changing mean ... [more ▼]

We review observational, experimental and model results on how plants respond to extreme climatic conditions induced by changing climatic variability. Distinguishing between impacts of changing mean climatic conditions and changing climatic variability on terrestrial ecosystems is generally underrated in current studies. The goals of our review are thus (1) to identify plant processes that are vulnerable to changes in the variability of climatic variables rather than to changes in their mean, and (2) to depict/evaluate available study designs to quantify responses of plants to changing climatic variability. We find that phenology is largely affected by changing mean climate but also that impacts of climatic variability are much less studied but potentially damaging. We note that plant water relations seem to be very vulnerable to extremes driven by changes in temperature and precipitation and that heatwaves and flooding have stronger impacts on physiological processes than changing mean climate. Moreover, interacting phenological and physiological processes are likely to further complicate plant responses to changing climatic variability. Phenological and physiological processes and their interactions culminate in even more sophisticated responses to changing mean climate and climatic variability at the species and community level. Generally, observational studies are well suited to study plant responses to changing mean climate, but less suitable to gain a mechanistic understanding of plant responses to climatic variability. Experiments seem best suited to simulate extreme events. In models, temporal resolution and model structure are crucial to capture plant responses to changing climatic variability. We highlight that a combination of experimental, observational and /or modeling studies have the potential to overcome important caveats of the respective individual approaches. [less ▲]

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See detailPlant-animal mutualistic interaction: the case of the Uapaca trees and the western lowland gorilla (G. g. gorilla)
Petre, Charles-Albert ULg; Tagg, Nikki; Beudels-Jamar, Roseline et al

in Primate Tidings (2012), 27

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See detailPlant-based production of human lysozyme mutants
Tocquin, Pierre ULg; Dumoulin, Mireille ULg; Dony, Nicolas ULg et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailPlant-RNA viroid relationship: a complex host pathogen interaction
Parisi, Olivier ULg; Lepoivre, Philippe ULg; Jijakli, Haissam ULg

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2010), 14(3),

Viroids are non encapsidated small RNA plant pathogens unable to produce any protein. They are able to infect dramatically a broad range of plants including herbaceous and tree crops. The ways by which ... [more ▼]

Viroids are non encapsidated small RNA plant pathogens unable to produce any protein. They are able to infect dramatically a broad range of plants including herbaceous and tree crops. The ways by which viroids are able to induce diseases are actually unknown. However, recent studies have shown that viroids are able to regulate the gene expression of their hosts, they can modify the host-protein phosphorylation sensibility and they interact with host-protein implicated RNA trafficking and protein phosphorylation. Moreover during their evolution plants have developed a mechanism able to regulate their gene expression and to degrade exogenous RNAs like viroids: the gene silencing. Unfortunately, this pathway seems, now, also highly implicated in the symptoms development. This review describes studies that are realized since a few years to increase the knowledge about the plant-viroid relationship. [less ▲]

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See detailPlantation mélangée d'épicéa commun et de douglas
Di Placido, J.; Colson, Vincent ULg; Michaud, D. et al

in Forêt-Entreprise (2006), (170), 16-18

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See detailLes plantations villageoises de bois énergie : une approche participative pour réduire la déforestation
Vermeulen, Cédric ULg; Dubiez, Emilien; Peltier, Régis et al

Conference (2012, October 24)

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See detailPlante-t-on l'épicéa n'importe où ? L'apport d'une analyse objective de la pessière wallonne.
Claessens, Hugues ULg; Lecomte, Hugues; Lejeune, Philippe ULg et al

in Forêt Wallonne (2001), (49-50), 45-51

Depuis son introduction dans la sylviculture belge au milieu du XIXe siècle, l'épicéa s'est progressivement imposé principalement grâce à sa bonne adaptation aux difficiles conditions écologiques de l ... [more ▼]

Depuis son introduction dans la sylviculture belge au milieu du XIXe siècle, l'épicéa s'est progressivement imposé principalement grâce à sa bonne adaptation aux difficiles conditions écologiques de l'Ardenne, la facilité de sa culture et sa haute productivité en sols pauvres. Il est devenu la première essence de la forêt wallonne où il représente près de la moitié du volume de bois sur pied. Mais petit à petit, l'impact négatif de sa culture à grande échelle sur l'environnement s'est aussi révélé, notamment lors de son introduction dans des milieux fragiles qu'il a altérés, voire détruits. Ces erreurs ont progressivement amené de plus en plus d'observateurs de notre patrimoine naturel à rejeter globalement l'épicéa et sa culture en Belgique. Ces cas malheureux sur lesquels se sont focalisées l'opinion publique et scientifique sont-ils l'exeption ? Dans quelle mesure l'épicéa a-t-il colonisé à tort certains milieux ? Dans quelles conditions sa culture est-elle acceptable, tolérée ou à exclure ? C'est à ce type de question que la présente étude tente de répondre. [less ▲]

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See detailPlantes d'intérieur : attention aux risques d'allergies
MARCHAL, Alan; NIKKELS, Arjen ULg

in Vers l'Avenir (2009)

Plusieurs dermatologues l'affirment : certaines fleurs et plantes d'intérieur peuvent être à l'origine d'allergies. Le point.

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)
See detailLes plantes emsiennes de Marchin (vallée du Hoyoux, Belgique
Gerrienne, Philippe ULg

in Annales de la Société Géologique de Belgique (1983), 106

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (9 ULg)
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See detailLes plantes exotiques envahissantes en Belgique ont-elles des impacts?
Saad, Layla ULg; Jacquemart, Anne-Laure; Cawoy, Valérie et al

in Parcs & Réserves (2009), 64(4), 10-16

Detailed reference viewed: 109 (24 ULg)
See detailLes plantes exotiques envahissantes et leurs impacts
Meerts, Pierre; Dassonville, Nicolas; Vanderhoeven, SONIA ULg et al

in Lebrun, Philippe (Ed.) Biodiversité: Etat, enjeux et perspectives (2004)

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See detailLes plantes indicatrices des stations : observer la végétation pour choisir une essence adaptée au milieu. Fiche technique n°9
de Wouters, P.; Claessens, Hugues ULg

in Silva Belgica (2006), 113(3), -

La végétation présente dans une parcelle peut vous fournir des informations précieuses relatives ) la richesse en matière nutritive (niveau trophique) et en eau (niveau hydrique) du sol. L'observation des ... [more ▼]

La végétation présente dans une parcelle peut vous fournir des informations précieuses relatives ) la richesse en matière nutritive (niveau trophique) et en eau (niveau hydrique) du sol. L'observation des plantes indicatrices vous guide pour définir l'aptitude des essences en place ou de celle que vous pouvez y introduire. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 164 (20 ULg)