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See detailThe mechanism of action of DD-peptidases: the role of Threonine-299 and -301 in the Streptomyces R61 DD-peptidase.
Wilkin, J M; Dubus, Alice ULg; Joris, Bernard ULg et al

in Biochemical Journal (1994), 301 ( Pt 2)

The side chains of residues Thr299 and Thr301 in the Streptomyces R61 DD-peptidase have been modified by site-directed mutagenesis. These amino acids are part of a beta-strand which forms a wall of the ... [more ▼]

The side chains of residues Thr299 and Thr301 in the Streptomyces R61 DD-peptidase have been modified by site-directed mutagenesis. These amino acids are part of a beta-strand which forms a wall of the active-site cavity. Thr299 corresponds to the second residue of the Lys-Thr(Ser)-Gly triad, highly conserved in active-site beta-lactamases and penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). Modification of Thr301 resulted only in minor alterations of the catalytic and penicillin-binding properties of the enzyme. No selective decrease of the rate of acylation was observed for any particular class of compounds. By contrast, the loss of the hydroxy group of the residue in position 299 yielded a seriously impaired enzyme. The rates of inactivation by penicillins were decreased 30-50-fold, whereas the reactions with cephalosporins were even more affected. The efficiency of hydrolysis against the peptide substrate was also seriously decreased. More surprisingly, the mutant was completely unable to catalyse transpeptidation reactions. The conservation of an hydroxylated residue in this position in PBPs is thus easily explained by these results. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Mechanism of Action of DD-Peptidases: The Role of Tyrosine-159 in the Streptomyces R61 DD-Peptidase
Wilkin, Jean-Marc; Jamin, Marc; Damblon, Christian ULg et al

in Biochemical Journal (1993), 291(Part 2), 537-544

Tyrosine-159 of the Streptomyces R61 penicillin-sensitive DD-peptidase was replaced by serine or phenylalanine. The second mutation yielded a very poorly active protein whose rate of penicillin binding ... [more ▼]

Tyrosine-159 of the Streptomyces R61 penicillin-sensitive DD-peptidase was replaced by serine or phenylalanine. The second mutation yielded a very poorly active protein whose rate of penicillin binding was also drastically decreased, except for the reactions with nitrocefin and methicillin. The consequences of the first mutation were more surprising, since a large proportion of the thiolesterase activity was retained, together with the penicillin-binding capacity. Conversely, the peptidase properties was severely affected. In both cases, a drastic decrease in the transferase activity was observed. The results are compared with those obtained by mutation of the corresponding residue in the class A beta-lactamase of Streptomyces albus G. [less ▲]

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See detailMechanism of action of free or incorporated into liposomes cis-DDPt : a comparative study in Ehrlich tumour cells
De Pauw-Gillet, Marie-Claire ULg; Houssier, Claude ULg; weber, georges et al

in Hacher, M. P.; Douple, F. B.; Krakoff, I. M. (Eds.) Platinum Coordination Complexes in Cancer Chemotherapy (1984)

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See detailMechanism of action of Tamoxifen
Charlier, Corinne ULg

Conference (1995)

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See detailMechanism of action of β-lactamases and DD-peptidases
Frère, Jean-Marie ULg; Joris, Bernard ULg; Jacob, Françoise et al

in Pandit, U.K.; Alderweireldt, F.C. (Eds.) Bioorganic Chemistry in Healthcare and Technology (1991)

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See detailMechanism of acyl transfer by the class A serine β-lactamase of Streptomyces albus G
Lamotte-Brasseur, Josette; Dive, Georges ULg; Dideberg, Otto et al

in Biochemical Journal (1991), 279(Pt 1), 213-221

Optimization by energy minimization of stable complexes occurring along the pathway of hydrolysis of benzylpenicillin and cephalosporin C by the Streptomyces albus G beta-lactamase has highlighted a ... [more ▼]

Optimization by energy minimization of stable complexes occurring along the pathway of hydrolysis of benzylpenicillin and cephalosporin C by the Streptomyces albus G beta-lactamase has highlighted a proton shuttle that may explain the catalytic mechanism of the beta-lactamases of class A. Five residues, S70, S130, N132, T235 and A237, are involved in ligand binding. The gamma-OH group of T235 and, in the case of benzylpenicillin, the gamma-OH group of S130 interact with the carboxylate group, on one side of the ligand molecule. The side-chain NH2 group of N132 and the carbonyl backbone of A237 interact with the exocyclic CONH amide bond, on the other side of the ligand. The backbone NH groups of S70 and A237 polarize the carbonyl group of the scissile beta-lactam amide bond. Four residues, S70, K73, S130 and E166, and two water molecules, W1 and W2, perform hydrolysis of the bound beta-lactam compound. E166, via W1, abstracts the proton from the gamma-OH group of S70. While losing its proton, the O-gamma atom of S70 attacks the carbonyl carbon atom of the beta-lactam ring and, concomitantly, the proton is delivered back to the adjacent nitrogen atom via W2, K73 and S130, thus achieving formation of the acyl-enzyme. Subsequently, E166 abstracts a proton from W1. While losing its proton, W1 attacks the carbonyl carbon atom of the S70 ester-linked acyl-enzyme and, concomitantly, re-entry of a water molecule W'1 replacing W1 allows E166 to deliver the proton back to the same carbonyl carbon atom, thus achieving hydrolysis of the beta-lactam compound and enzyme recovery. The model well explains the differences found in the kcat. values for hydrolysis of benzylpenicillin and cephalosporin C by the Streptomyces albus G beta-lactamase. It also explains the effects caused by site-directed mutagenesis of the Bacillus cereus beta-lactamase I [Gibson, Christensen [less ▲]

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See detailMechanism of amyloid fibril formation by human lysozyme and VHHs
Dumoulin, Mireille ULg; Chavignon, Chloé ULg

Conference (2011, January)

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See detailThe mechanism of catalysis and the inhibition of the Bacillus cereus zinc-dependent beta-lactamase.
Bounaga, S.; Laws, A. P.; Galleni, Moreno ULg et al

in The Biochemical journal (1998), 331 ( Pt 3)

The plot of kcat/Km against pH for the Bacillus cereus 569/H beta-lactamase class B catalysed hydrolysis of benzylpenicillin and cephalosporin indicates that there are three catalytically important groups ... [more ▼]

The plot of kcat/Km against pH for the Bacillus cereus 569/H beta-lactamase class B catalysed hydrolysis of benzylpenicillin and cephalosporin indicates that there are three catalytically important groups, two of pKa 5.6+/-0.2 and one of pKa 9.5+/-0.2. Below pH 5 there is an inverse second-order dependence of reactivity upon hydrogen ion concentration, indicative of the requirement of two basic residues for catalysis. These are assigned to zinc(II)-bound water and Asp-90, both with a pKa of 5.6+/-0.2. A thiol, N-(2'-mercaptoethyl)-2-phenylacetamide, is an inhibitor of the class B enzyme with a Ki of 70 microM. The pH-dependence of Ki shows similar pH inflections to those observed in the catalysed hydrolysis of substrates. The pH-independence of Ki between pH 6 and 9 indicates that the pKa of zinc(II)-bound water must be 5.6 and not the higher pKa of 9.5. The kinetic solvent isotope effect on kcat/Km is 1.3+/-0.5 and that on kcat is 1.5. There is no effect on reactivity by either added zinc(II) or methanol. The possible mechanisms of action for the class B beta-lactamase are discussed, and it is concluded that zinc(II) acts as a Lewis acid to stabilize the dianionic form of the tetrahedral intermediate and to provide a hydroxide-ion bound nucleophile, whereas the carboxylate anion of Asp-90 acts as a general base to form the dianion and also, presumably, as a general acid catalyst facilitating C-N bond fission. [less ▲]

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See detailMechanism of Collisional Heating in Electrospray Mass Spectrometry: Ion Trajectory Calculations
Hoxha, Antuan; Collette, Caroline ULg; De Pauw, Edwin ULg et al

in Journal of Physical Chemistry A (2001), 105

To simulate the multicollisional heating process taking place in the intermediate pressure region of an electrospray source, ion trajectory calculations have been preformed by introducing in the SIMION ... [more ▼]

To simulate the multicollisional heating process taking place in the intermediate pressure region of an electrospray source, ion trajectory calculations have been preformed by introducing in the SIMION program a subroutine for handling the collision dynamics. The simulated internal energy distributions are compared with already available experimental distributions obtained by the "survival ion yield" method. [less ▲]

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See detailMechanism of Colon Cancer Cell Apoptosis Mediated by Pyropheophorbide-a Methylester Photosensitization
Matroule, Jean-Yves; Carthy, Chris M; Granville, David J et al

in Oncogene (2001), 20

Pyropheophorbide-a methylester (PPME) is a second generation of photosensitizers used in photodynamic therapy (PDT). We demonstrated that PPME photosensitization triggered apoptosis of colon cancer cells ... [more ▼]

Pyropheophorbide-a methylester (PPME) is a second generation of photosensitizers used in photodynamic therapy (PDT). We demonstrated that PPME photosensitization triggered apoptosis of colon cancer cells as measured by using several classical parameters such as DNA laddering, PARP cleavage, caspase activation and mitochondrial release of cytochrome c. Preincubation of cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or pyrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) protected against apoptosis mediated by PPME photosensitization showing that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved as second messengers. On the other hand, photosensitization carried out in the presence of deuterium oxide (D2O) which enhances singlet oxygen (1O2) lifetime only increases necrosis without affecting apoptosis. Since PPME was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)/Golgi system and lysosomes, other messengers than ROS were tested such as calcium, Bid, Bap31, phosphorylated Bcl-2 and caspase-12 but none was clearly identified as being involved in triggering cytochrome c release from mitochondria. On the other hand, we demonstrated that the transduction pathways leading to NF-kappaB activation and apoptosis were clearly independent although NF-kappaB was shown to counteract apoptosis mediated by PPME photosensitization. [less ▲]

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See detailMechanism of improvement in mitral regurgitation after cardiac resynchronization therapy.
Ypenburg, Claudia; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Tops, Laurens F et al

in European Heart Journal (2008), 29(6), 757-65

AIMS: The aim of the current study was to evaluate the relationship between the presence of left ventricular (LV) dyssynchrony at baseline and acute vs. late improvement in mitral regurgitation (MR) after ... [more ▼]

AIMS: The aim of the current study was to evaluate the relationship between the presence of left ventricular (LV) dyssynchrony at baseline and acute vs. late improvement in mitral regurgitation (MR) after cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). METHODS AND RESULTS: Sixty eight patients consecutive (LV ejection fraction 23 +/- 8%) with at least moderate MR (>or=grade 2+) were included. Echocardiography was performed at baseline, 1 day after CRT initiation and at 6 months follow-up. Speckle tracking radial strain was used to assess LV dyssynchrony at baseline. The majority of patients improved in MR after CRT, with 43% improving immediately after CRT, and 20% improving late (after 6 months) after CRT. Early and late responders had similar extent of LV dyssynchrony (209 +/- 115 ms vs. 190 +/- 118 ms, P = NS); however, the site of latest activation in early responders was mostly inferior or posterior (adjacent to the posterior papillary muscle), whereas the lateral wall was the latest activated segment in late responders. CONCLUSION: Current data suggest that the presence of baseline LV dyssynchrony is related to improvement in MR after CRT. LV dyssynchrony involving the posterior papillary muscle may lead to an immediate reduction in MR, whereas LV dyssynchrony in the lateral wall resulted in late response to CRT. [less ▲]

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See detailMechanism of Nicotinic acid-induced Flushing
Hanson, Julien ULg

Conference (2011, June 10)

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See detailThe mechanism of polymer drag reduction
Terrapon, Vincent ULg

Scientific conference (2004, February)

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See detailMechanism of reoxygenation after antiangiogenic therapy using SU5416 and its importance for guiding combined antitumor therapy
ANSIAUX, Réginald; BAUDELET, Christine; JORDAN, Bénédicte et al

in Cancer Research (2006), 66(19), 9698704

Emerging preclinical studies support the concept of a transient "normalization" of tumor vasculature during the early stage of antiangiogenic treatment, with possible beneficial effects on associated ... [more ▼]

Emerging preclinical studies support the concept of a transient "normalization" of tumor vasculature during the early stage of antiangiogenic treatment, with possible beneficial effects on associated radiotherapy or chemotherapy. One key issue in this area of research is to determine whether this feature is common to all antiangiogenic drugs and whether the phenomenon occurs in all types of tumors. In the present study, we characterized the evolution of the tumor oxygenation (in transplantable liver tumor and FSAII tumor models) after administration of SU5416, an antagonist of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. SU5416 induced an early increase in tumor oxygenation [measured by electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR)], which did not correlate with remodeling of the tumor vasculature (assessed by CD31 labeling using immunohistochemistry) or with tumor perfusion (measured by dynamic contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging). Inhibition of mitochondrial respiration (measured by EPR) was responsible for this early reoxygenation. Consistent with these unique findings in the tumor microenvironment, we found that SU5416 potentiated tumor response to radiotherapy but not to chemotherapy. In addition to the fact that the characterization of the tumor oxygenation is essential to enable correct application of combined therapies, our results show that the long-term inhibition of oxygen consumption is a potential novel target in this class of compounds. [less ▲]

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See detailMechanism of resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy.
Cimino, Jonathan ULg; Sounni, Nor Eddine ULg; Debois, Delphine ULg et al

Poster (2013, May 17)

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See detailMechanism of Single-Electron Capture by the Dichlorocarbene Dication.
Leyh, Bernard ULg; Hautot, D.

in Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry (1996), 7

The single-electron capture (SEC) by dichlorocarbene with eight different atomic and molecular target gases, (CCl2)2++G->(CCl2)++G+, has been studied by product ion spectroscopy and ion kinetic energy ... [more ▼]

The single-electron capture (SEC) by dichlorocarbene with eight different atomic and molecular target gases, (CCl2)2++G->(CCl2)++G+, has been studied by product ion spectroscopy and ion kinetic energy spectroscopy. The experimental data have been interpreted in the framework of a theoretical model that describes the charge exchange process. Exothermic charge exchange is handled within the Landau-Zener model, whereas endothermic charge exchange is described by the Demkov model. The calculated data reproduce qualitatively the essential features of the experimental results: (1) the appearance of a reaction window centered at an exothermicity in the 4-4.5 eV range, (2) the lower SEC cross sections for endothermic charge exchange, (3) the wider internal energy distributions obtained for CCl2+ in the endothermic regime than in the exothermic one, which results in larger dissociation yields, (4) the excitation of molecular targets that accompany their ionization in the SEC process, and (5) the kinetic energy released on the CCl++Cl fragments in dissociative SEC. [less ▲]

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