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See detailLes populations rurales : évolutions et perceptions en Wallonie
Mougenot, Catherine ULg

in Espace, Populations, Sociétés (1986), III

Les connaissances sur les populations rurales sont elles-mêmes produites par les représentations qu’on se fait de ce monde rural. Elles mobilisent des catégories de description et d’analyse qui sont ... [more ▼]

Les connaissances sur les populations rurales sont elles-mêmes produites par les représentations qu’on se fait de ce monde rural. Elles mobilisent des catégories de description et d’analyse qui sont influencées par le contexte du moment. Autrement dit, elles sont le reflet de préoccupations sociales qui définissent les questions prioritaires ou pertinentes à leur sujet. L’analyse porte plus spécifiquement sur la situation de l’après-guerre en Région wallonne (Belgique). [less ▲]

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See detailPopulations vulnérables en temps de conflit armé
Pierre, Alexia ULg

in Guedah, Mohamed (Ed.) Délinquance et changements sociaux – dialogue nord/sud (2009)

De nombreux textes conventionnels et internationaux prévoient des dispositions de protection des populations non combattantes en temps de conflit armé. Parmi ces populations civiles, certains groupes sont ... [more ▼]

De nombreux textes conventionnels et internationaux prévoient des dispositions de protection des populations non combattantes en temps de conflit armé. Parmi ces populations civiles, certains groupes sont considérés comme plus vulnérables, dont les femmes et les enfants, pour lesquels des protections spéciales sont prévues. Malgré ces dispositions particulières, ces populations continuent de subir des exactions en temps de guerre, par exemple le viol systématique et massif, ou l'utilisation d'enfants dans les combats. [less ▲]

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See detailPopulism and producerism in Europe and United States
Jamin, Jérôme ULg

Conference (2003)

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See detailPopulisme en Europe
Jamin, Jérôme ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2008)

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See detailPopulisme et stigmatisation d’une lutte ouvrière : l’affaire "Clabecq"
Geuens, Geoffrey ULg

in Hermès (2005), 42 ("Peuple, populaire, populisme")

The journalistic coverage of the social struggle of the Forges de Clabecq was characterized by the growing development of stereotypes which were supposed to describe the very singular personality of the ... [more ▼]

The journalistic coverage of the social struggle of the Forges de Clabecq was characterized by the growing development of stereotypes which were supposed to describe the very singular personality of the trade unionist leader. Populist, extremist, dictator, gangster or even guru, the journalistic figures of the proletarian leader followed one another throughout the conflict. This growing criminalization of the social movement is explained by the intensity of the political stakes of this affair but also by the deep ignorance of the working-class in the case of journalists who belong to the middle class. [less ▲]

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See detailPopulisme, dépolitisation, délégitimation
Delruelle, Edouard ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2010)

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See detailPorc et reduction des rejets azotes.
Leterme, Pascal; Thewis, André ULg

in Agricontact (1994), (259), 3-4

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See detailLe porc sur parcours : le retour aux origines.
Bindelle, Jérôme ULg

Article for general public (2003)

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See detailLes porcheries : réservoirs des culicoïdes (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), vecteurs des virus de la Maladie de la Langue bleue et de Schmallenberg ?
Zimmer, Jean-Yves ULg; Saegerman, Claude; Martinelle, Ludovic et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2014)

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See detailPorcine anatomy as a training model in vascular in interventionnal radiology
Ghysels; Brisbois; Donkers et al

Poster (1996)

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See detailPorcine CD18 mediates Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae ApxIII species-specific toxicity
Vanden bergh, Philippe; Zecchinon, Laurent; Fett, Thomas ULg et al

in Veterinary Research (2009), 40(4), 33

Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, produces Apx toxins that are recognized as major virulence factors. Recently, we showed that ApxIIIA-cytotoxic activity ... [more ▼]

Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, produces Apx toxins that are recognized as major virulence factors. Recently, we showed that ApxIIIA-cytotoxic activity specifically targets Sus scrofa leukocytes. Since both LtxA from Aggregatibacter actinomycetem comitans (aggressive periodontitis in humans) and LktA from Mannheimia haemolytica (pneumonia in ruminants) share this characteristic, respectively towards human and ruminant leukocytes, and because both use the CD18 subunit to interact with their respective LFA-1, we hypothesized that ApxIIIA was likely to bind porcine CD18 to exercise its deleterious effects on pig leukocytes. A beta(2)-integrin-deficient ApxIIIA-resistant human erythroleukemic cell line was transfected either with homologous or heterologous CD11a/ CD18 heterodimers using a set of plasmids coding for human (ApxIIIA-resistant), bovine (-resistant) and porcine (-susceptible) CD11a and CD18 subunits. Cell preparations that switched from ApxIIIA-resistance to -susceptibility were then sought to identify the LFA-1 subunit involved. The results showed that the ApxIIIA-resistant recipient cell line was rendered susceptible only if the CD18 partner within the LFA-1 heterodimer was that of the pig. It is concluded that porcine CD18 is necessary to mediate A. pleuropneumoniae ApxIIIA toxin-induced leukolysis. [less ▲]

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See detailPorcine embryo development and fragmentation and their relation to apoptotic markers: a cinematographic and confocal laser scanning microscopic study.
Mateusen, Bart; Van Soom, Ann; Maes, Dominiek G D et al

in Reproduction (Cambridge, England) (2005), 129(4), 443-52

Porcine embryo selection prior to transfer is mainly influenced by morphological criteria. However, the relationship between embryonic morphology, developmental potential and cell death by apoptosis in ... [more ▼]

Porcine embryo selection prior to transfer is mainly influenced by morphological criteria. However, the relationship between embryonic morphology, developmental potential and cell death by apoptosis in porcine embryos is still unclear. The aim of this study was to establish embryo quality parameters for in vivo fertilised porcine embryos based on timing of development in vitro, embryo morphology and the presence of apoptosis. The kinetics of development and morphological parameters were investigated in a time-lapse cinematographic experiment. Possible links between embryo morphology and apoptosis were examined via a confocal laser scanning experiment, analysing nuclear changes, annexin V and terminal dUTP nick-end labelling. The timing of early cleavages was firmly linked to embryo developmental competence in vitro. Attainment of at least the 5-cell stage before 77 h post insemination and attainment of the morula stage before 102 h post insemination significantly increased the odds for reaching the early blastocyst stage. Overall, a negative effect of fragmentation percentage and fragmentation pattern on subsequent embryonic development was observed, but the developmental potential of embryos experiencing slight fragmentation (0-5%) was not different from embryos without fragmentation. Correlations detected between developmental arrest and fragmentation, and fragmentation and apoptosis were 0.60 and 0.87 (P < 0.05) respectively. Only a minority of the embryos arrested between the 1- and 4-cell stage displayed biochemical characteristics of apoptosis. Consequently, a significant correlation (0.57) between developmental arrest and apoptosis could only be established for embryos arrested after embryonic genome activation. [less ▲]

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See detailPorcine trial validation of model-based cardiovascular monitoring of acute pulmonary embolism
Revie, JA; Stevenson, DJ; Shaw, GM et al

in Proceedings of ANZICS 2011 (2011)

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See detailA pore mutation in a novel KQT-like potassium channel gene in an idiopathic epilepsy family.
Charlier, Carole ULg; Singh, N. A.; Ryan, S. G. et al

in Nature Genetics (1998), 18(1), 53-5

Epileptic disorders affect about 20-40 million people worldwide, and 40% of these are idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs; ref. 1). Most of the IGEs that are inherited are complex, multigenic diseases ... [more ▼]

Epileptic disorders affect about 20-40 million people worldwide, and 40% of these are idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs; ref. 1). Most of the IGEs that are inherited are complex, multigenic diseases. To address basic mechanisms for epilepsies, we have focused on one well-defined class of IGEs with an autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance: the benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNC; refs 2,3). Genetic heterogeneity of BFNC has been observed. Two loci, EBN1 and EBN2, have been mapped by linkage analysis to chromosome 20q13 (refs 5,6) and chromosome 8q24 (refs 7,8), respectively. By positional cloning, we recently identified the gene for EBN1 as KCNQ2 (ref. 9). This gene, a voltage-gated potassium channel, based on homology, is a member of the KQT-like family. Here we describe an additional member, KCNQ3. We mapped this new gene to chromosome 8, between markers D8S256 and D8S284 on a radiation hybrid map. We screened KCNQ3 for mutations in the large BFNC family previously linked to chromosome 8q24 in the same marker interval. We found a missense mutation in the critical pore region in perfect co-segregation with the BFNC phenotype. The same conserved amino acid is also mutated in KVLQT1 (KCNQ1) in an LQT patient. KCNQ2, KCNQ3 and undiscovered genes of the same family of K+ channels are strong candidates for other IGEs. [less ▲]

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See detailPore size distribution of baker’s yeast evaluation using x-ray micro-tomography
Debaste, Frédéric; Léonard, Angélique ULg; Halloin, Véronique et al

Poster (2008, September)

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See detailPore structure evolution of highly ordered mesoporous silica CMI-1 during boiling water treatment: A multi-technique investigation
Léonard, Alexandre ULg; Blin, J. L.; Su, B. L.

in Colloids and Surfaces A : Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects (2004), 241(1-3), 87-93

The structural, textural and morphological evolution of calcined surfactant-free mesoporous molecular sieves treated in boiling water was investigated and explained by a three-step mechanism. The ... [more ▼]

The structural, textural and morphological evolution of calcined surfactant-free mesoporous molecular sieves treated in boiling water was investigated and explained by a three-step mechanism. The materials, prepared by a non-ionic surfactant [C16(EO)10] templating pathway, undergo a sharp decrease in surface area and pore size at the initial stage due to the partial hydrolysis of the silica walls. Then, the dissolution of the resulting branched (Si-O-)n chains attached to the internal surface of the pores results in a gain of surface area and pore size. Finally, the loss in surface area and the sharp increase in pore sizes is due to the destruction of the pore walls and thus of the materials. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailPore-filling of Spiro-OMeTAD determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in templated TiO2 photoelectrodes
Dewalque, Jennifer ULg; Colson, Pierre ULg; Thalluri, Venkata Visveswara Gopala Kris ULg et al

in Organic Electronics (2014), 15

Liquid-state dye-sensitized solar cells can suffer from electrolyte evaporation and leakage. Therefore solid-state hole transporting materials are investigated as alternative electrolyte materials ... [more ▼]

Liquid-state dye-sensitized solar cells can suffer from electrolyte evaporation and leakage. Therefore solid-state hole transporting materials are investigated as alternative electrolyte materials. However, in solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells, optimal TiO2 films thickness is limited to a few microns allowing the adsorption of only a low quantity of photoactive dye and thus leading to poor light harvesting and low conversion efficiency. In order to overcome this limitation, high surface area templated films are investigated as alternative to nanocrystalline films prepared by doctor-blade or screen-printing. Moreover, templating is expected to improve the pore accessibility what would promote the solid electrolyte penetration inside the porous network, making possible efficient charge transfers. In this study, films prepared from different structuring agents are discussed in terms of microstructural properties (porosity, crystallinity) as well as impact on the dye loading and Spiro-OMeTAD (2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenylamine)9,9'-spirobifluorene) solid electrolyte filling. We first report Rutherford backscattering spectrometry as an innovative non-destructive tool to characterize the hole transporting materials infiltration. Templated films show dye loading more than two times higher than nanocrystalline films prepared by doctor-blade or screen-printing and solid electrolyte infiltration up to 88%. [less ▲]

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See detailPores formation on cell membranes by hederacolchiside A1 leads to a rapid release of proteins for cytosolic subproteome analysis
Mazzucchelli, Gabriel ULg; Cellier, Nicolas A; Mshviladzade, Vakhtang et al

in Journal of Proteome Research (2008), 7(4), 1683-1692

Hederacolchiside A1 was used to progressively permeabilize the membrane of human melanoma MEL-5 cells. Holes formation was followed by Scanning Electron Microscopy and interaction of the saponin with ... [more ▼]

Hederacolchiside A1 was used to progressively permeabilize the membrane of human melanoma MEL-5 cells. Holes formation was followed by Scanning Electron Microscopy and interaction of the saponin with cholesterol and phospholipids by TOF-SIMS. 2D-LC-MS/MS and 2D-SDS-PAGE show that the release of soluble proteins into serum-free culture media increases with time. This can lead to a new rapid and efficient strategy to analyze the cytosolic subproteome and it opens the door to get information from the cytosolic compartment for clinical proteomic studies. [less ▲]

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See detailPork quality as related to halothane genotype and slaughter conditions in a belgian study
Leroy, Bernadette ULg; Beduin, Jean-Marie; Etienne, Grégory et al

in Proceedings of the 50th International Congress of Meat Science and Technology (2004, August)

The objectives of this study were to evaluate technological and organoleptic properties of pork meat representative of different Belgian production systems and to determine the contribution of significant ... [more ▼]

The objectives of this study were to evaluate technological and organoleptic properties of pork meat representative of different Belgian production systems and to determine the contribution of significant factors to meat quality variability, in particular the halothane genotype, fasting time, lairage time and slaughtering plant. A total of 521 pigs were used in five Belgian commercial slaughtering plants over a 1 ½ year period. 79% of pigs belonged to four different quality production systems. The remaining 21% were randomly sampled in standard production. The lairage time (LT) was measured at slaughter. In the slaughterline, the entire intestinal tractus (OW) and the carcass (HCW) were weighed, the pH1 and electrical conductivity (PQM1) were measured 45 min post mortem in the longissimus dorsi muscle. One 2.5 cm thick cut of this muscle was removed 24h post mortem for further measurements in the lab : ultimate pH (pHu), ultimate electrical conductivity (PQMu), color (CIE L*a*b*), drip loss (DL), cooking loss (CL) and tenderness (WBPSF). The halothane genotype (CC, CT and TT for homozygote negative, heterozygote negative and homozygote positive for the RYR1 gene mutation respectively). The data were analyzed using SAS and the General Linear Model (GLM) SAS procedure was used in order to estimate the influence of halothane genotype, LT and slaughterhouse on the variability of pH1, PQM1, pHu, PQMu, drip loss, cooking loss, CIE Lab and WBPSF. The relative weight of OW on HCW was included in the models as covariate and used as inverse indicator of the fasting time. Least Squares Means (LSM) were computed for significant effect in the models and compared pairwise by the Student’s t-test. A large variation was observed for the meat quality parameters, in particular for pH1 (from 5.30 to 6.85), DL (from 1.2 to 11.4%) and CIE L* (from 41.6 to 66.4%). The lowest values for pH1 and highest values for DL or CIE L* indicated the presence of pale, soft, exudative meat. For all parameters –except for the pHu, CL and WBPSF– a moderate to great part of variation was explained by the GLM models (R² = 0.22-0.56). The halothane genotype effect was highly significant (p<0.001) on most meat quality traits : pH1, PQM1, PQMu and color parameters (CIE Lab) but not significant on pHu and CL. The LT had a highly significant influence only on PQMu, CIE b and DL. There was a highly significant effect (p<0.01) of the slaughtering plant on pH1, PQM1, PQMu and color parameters (CIE Lab) and a significant influence (p<0.01) on the variability of DL and CL. By contrast, the fasting time had no effect on most meat quality parameters except on DL (p<0.01) and CL (p<0.001). As indicated by the regression coefficient, an increase of OW/hot HCW seems to be related to an increase of DL (p<0.01) or CL (p<0.001). From the halothane genotype Least Squares Means and their standard errors, it appeared that meat quality was negatively affected by the presence of the RYR1 mutation. DL differed significantly (p<0.05) between genotypes with the TT pigs having the highest DL (6.8%) while that of the CC (5.5%) was the lowest and that of CT intermediate (6.1%). CL was also significantly higher (p<0.05) in TT pigs indicating lower water holding capacity. Significant differences between CC and TT genotypes (p< 0.05) were observed in terms of pH1 (6.12 vs 5.69), PQM1 (4.9 vs 6.4) and PQMu (9.7 vs 12.7). The CIE L and b values (56.9% and 16.6) were significantly higher (p<0.05) in the TT group comparatively to CC (55.0% and 15.8%) or CT pigs (54.6% and 15.4). The higher L value of the TT genotypes indicated paler meat. The WBPSF was the lowest for CT pigs with no significant difference observed between the CC and TT genotypes. A significant effect (p<0.05) of the abattoir was observed for all meat quality parameters. Although it would be necessary to determine the reasons for abattoirs differences, the small and old structure of one of the abattoirs and the lack of training of the staff could partially explain the results. Further research is needed to evaluate the interaction terms and to identify slaughtering factors which could explain slaughterhouse differences in terms of meat quality. [less ▲]

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