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See detailNuclear imaging methods for non-invasive drug monitoring.
Bhatnagar, A.; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Alavi, A.

in Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews (2000), 41(1), 41-54

Functional imaging techniques provide complimentary information to that provided by structural studies such as MRI and CT. Functional imaging is based upon known parameters such as physiology, metabolism ... [more ▼]

Functional imaging techniques provide complimentary information to that provided by structural studies such as MRI and CT. Functional imaging is based upon known parameters such as physiology, metabolism, biochemistry, pharmacology, and any other biological process. As such, this methodology plays a major role in understanding the basic mechanisms of a multitude of disorders, accurate diagnosis of certain diseases, and developing effective treatment for serious illnesses such as cancer and central nervous system maladies. Although this type of imaging can be performed with various modalities, nuclear procedures have played the leading role in this discipline. Advances made in labeling various radionuclides to biologically important compounds, and development of sophisticated instruments have substantially contributed to the growth of the field of functional imaging. The introduction of positron emission topography (PET), which is based on imaging of compounds labeled with elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and fluorine, has added a major dimension to the evolution of the discipline. This review deals with a brief introduction to the methodologies utilized with radiolabeled tracers and then deals with specific applications of this technology. These applications include assessment of blood flow and metabolism, receptor imaging, elucidating the pathophysiologic process, evaluating role of labeled therapeutic agents, and the potential of these techniques in the development of novel biologic therapies. Functional imaging with radiolabeled tracers will play an increasingly important role in modern medicine, and its impact will be substantial in the management of patients with various disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailNuclear Lesions During Rat Hepatocarcinogenesis. I. Measuring the Sister-Chromatid Exchanges During Initiation, Promotion and Progression of Rat Hepatocarcinogenesis Induced with Diethylnitrosamine
Herens, Christian ULg; Jacquemart, M.; Koulischer, Lucien ULg et al

in Mutation Research : Fundamental & Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis (1995), 329(2), 153-9

Cytogenetic endpoints such as sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs), chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei (MNs) have been widely used as indicators of genetic damage. However, no systematic attempts have ... [more ▼]

Cytogenetic endpoints such as sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs), chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei (MNs) have been widely used as indicators of genetic damage. However, no systematic attempts have been made to correlate the levels of these cytogenetic endpoints with the different steps of carcinogenesis. In the present report, the induction, accumulation and persistence of SCEs and high frequency cells (HFCs) were measured in liver cells during the initiation, promotion and progression steps of rat hepatocarcinogenesis induced by diethylnitrosamine (DEN). The results indicate that lesions leading to SCEs accumulate during initiation only. When DEN administration is longer than the duration of this first step, SCE values stabilize. After stopping the carcinogenic treatment, the SCE levels decrease to control values whether or not promotion and progression occur. [less ▲]

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See detailNuclear Lesions During Rat Hepatocarcinogenesis. II. Measuring the Micronuclei During Initiation, Promotion and Progression of Rat Hepatocarcinogenesis Induced with Diethylnitrosamine
Herens, Christian ULg; Massart, Sandrina ULg; Bouzahzah, B. et al

in Mutation Research : Fundamental & Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis (1995), 329(2), 161-71

We reported in our companion paper the strong correlation between elevated sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) frequencies and the initiation step of rat hepatocarcinogenesis. We have also shown that SCEs ... [more ▼]

We reported in our companion paper the strong correlation between elevated sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) frequencies and the initiation step of rat hepatocarcinogenesis. We have also shown that SCEs return to normal values during the promotion and the progression stages. In the present study, we evaluated the clastogenic activity of diethylnitrosamine (DEN) during initiation, promotion and progression of rat hepatocarcinogenesis. We measured, at various times after DEN administration, the number of micronuclei (MN) produced by the mitotic response to partial hepatectomy. The results established that the DEN treatment induces a great number of preclastogenic lesions. In subcarcinogenic conditions (initiation alone), the number of MN expressed after partial hepatectomy remains high regardless of the time interval between the end of the DEN treatment and the operation. In this condition, the preclastogenic lesions persist for up to 1 year after the DEN administration is discontinued. Conversely, in carcinogenic conditions (initiation + promotion + progression), the number of MN expressed after partial hepatectomy decreases during the promotion and progression stages. These observations indicate that promotion and progression but not initiation are associated with the expression of persistent preclastogenic lesions, resulting in the production of chromosomally abnormal hepatocytes. [less ▲]

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See detailNuclear Localization of a New C-Cbl Related Protein, Carp 90, During in Vivo Thymic Apoptosis in Mice
Denis, Ghislaine; Mandard, S.; Verlaet, Myriam ULg et al

in Cell Death & Differentiation (1999), 6(7), 689-97

This study investigates the involvement of the c-cbl protooncogene in thymocyte apoptosis occurring in vivo after hydrocortisone treatment. In the thymus of untreated mice, a few medullary and cortical ... [more ▼]

This study investigates the involvement of the c-cbl protooncogene in thymocyte apoptosis occurring in vivo after hydrocortisone treatment. In the thymus of untreated mice, a few medullary and cortical thymocytes expressed p120cbl, mainly in the cytoplasm. In the cortex, their number and distribution resemble that of apoptotic cells evidenced by TUNEL staining. The expression of Cbl is rapidly increased when apoptosis is triggered by hydrocortisone. This Cbl-specific immunostaining was detected in the nucleus and is due to a Cbl-related 90 kDa protein (CARP 90). These results show that a c-cbl product could localize in the nucleus and suggest that it could be involved as a regulator of thymic apoptosis. [less ▲]

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See detailNuclear magnetic relaxation studies on actinide ions and models of actinide complexes
Desreux, Jean-François ULg

in Advances in Inorganic Chemistry - Including Bioinorganic Studies, Vol 57 (2005)

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See detailNuclear Magnetic Resonance and Nuclear Waste Reprocessing.
Vidick, Geoffrey ULg; Bouslimani, Nouri; Desreux, Jean-François ULg

Poster (2011, April 29)

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See detailNuclear Magnetic Resonance and Nuclear Waste Reprocessing.
Vidick, Geoffrey ULg; Bouslimani, Nouri; Desreux, Jean-François ULg

Poster (2011, November 22)

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See detailNuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy : insights into experimental septic shock
GILLES, R; CARLIER, PG; D'Orio, Vincenzo ULg

in Intensive Care Medicine (1994)

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See detailNuclear Magnetic Resonance, Thermogravimetric and Differential Scanning Calorimetry for Monitoring Changes of Sponge Cakes During Storage at 20 °C and 65 % Relative Humidity
Botosoa, Eliot Patrick; Chèné, Christine; Blecker, Christophe ULg et al

in Food and Bioprocess Technology (2015), 8

This paper presents a study on sponge cakes produced at the pilot scale and monitored during ageing (i.e. 1, 3, 6, 9, 16 and 20 day(s)) by different analytical techniques: nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR ... [more ▼]

This paper presents a study on sponge cakes produced at the pilot scale and monitored during ageing (i.e. 1, 3, 6, 9, 16 and 20 day(s)) by different analytical techniques: nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Results from NMR showed that the spin–lattice relaxation time (T1), measured on the crumb part, decreased from day 1 to day 16 while the spin–spin relaxation time (T2) increased throughout the whole storage time (i.e. 1 to 20 day(s)). Based on the analysis of the state of water, TGA allowed to establishing a kinetic profile of retrogradation degree of starch contained in sponge cakes. This approach evidenced that the evolution of the sponge cakes freshness and staling closely depends on the dynamic of the water in the crumb during ageing. These results were supported by DSC thermograms exhibiting a variation of three main endotherms detected in sponge cakes at −15, +5 and +45 °C throughout ageing. The enthalpy changes of these endotherms reflected the evolution of chemical and physical reactions occurring in the sponge cakes during storage. The analysis of the endotherm enthalpy change at 45 °C allowed to determine the time τ (i.e. τ≈9 days) corresponding to the apparition of amylopectin crystallites that could be considered as a reference time to separate fresh sponge cakes from the aged ones. [less ▲]

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See detailNuclear materials I
Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline ULg

Learning material (2003)

*Brief review of most important mechanical properties of materials - stress-strain relationship - ductile and brittle fracture; ductile-brittle transition - fatigue failure - creep * Stress analysis ... [more ▼]

*Brief review of most important mechanical properties of materials - stress-strain relationship - ductile and brittle fracture; ductile-brittle transition - fatigue failure - creep * Stress analysis: stress intensity, thermal stresses * Functional requirements of materials in a nuclear environment - "nuclear" materials: fuel, fuel cladding, moderator/reflector, coolant - structural materials: reactor internals and vessel, piping, valves * Degradation mechanisms of materials in a nuclear environment - radiation effects: general principles, atomic displacements, embrittlement, swelling fatigue: due to thermal stresses and stratification - corrosion: p.m. (to be developed in course "Nuclear Materials II" * Detailed treatment of important materials in a nuclear environment (especially nuclear- mechanical interactions and relationships) - fuel and cladding - moderator/reflector - structural materials (incl reactor internals, reactor vessel) [less ▲]

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See detailNuclear medicine imaging
Jerusalem, Guy ULg; Withofs, Nadia ULg

in Schmoll, Hans-Joachim; Van't Veer, Laura; Vermorken, Jan (Eds.) et al ESMO Handbook of Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment Evaluation (2009)

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See detailThe nuclear phenotypic plasticity observed in fish during rRNA regulation entails Cajal bodies dynamics.
Alvarez, Marco; Nardocci, Gino; Thiry, Marc ULg et al

in Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications (2007), 360(1), 40-5

Cajal bodies (CBs) are small mobile organelles found throughout the nucleoplasm of animal and plant cells. The dynamics of these organelles involves interactions with the nucleolus. The later has been ... [more ▼]

Cajal bodies (CBs) are small mobile organelles found throughout the nucleoplasm of animal and plant cells. The dynamics of these organelles involves interactions with the nucleolus. The later has been found to play a substantial role in the compensatory response that evolved in eurythermal fish to adapt to the cyclic seasonal habitat changes, i.e., temperature and photoperiod. Contrary to being constitutive, rRNA synthesis is dramatically regulated between summer and winter, thus affecting ribosomal biogenesis which plays a central role in the acclimatization process. To examine whether CBs, up to now, never described in fish, were also sustaining the phenotypic plasticity observed in nuclei of fish undergoing seasonal acclimatization, we identified these organelles both, by transmission electronic microscopy and immunodetection with the marker protein p80-coilin. We found transcripts in all tissues analyzed. Furthermore we assessed that p80-coilin gene expression was always higher in summer-acclimatized fish when compared to that adapted to the cold season, indicating that p80-coilin expression is modulated upon seasonal acclimatization. Concurrently, CBs were more frequently found in summer-acclimatized carp which suggests that the organization of CBs is involved in adaptive processes and contribute to the phenotypic plasticity of fish cell nuclei observed concomitantly with profound reprogramming of nucleolar components and regulation of ribosomal rRNAs. [less ▲]

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See detailNuclear Physics as a relativistic theory
Jaminon, Martine ULg; Mahaux, Claude ULg

in Noble, J. V.; Whitney, R. R. (Eds.) New Horizons in Electromagnetic Physics (1983)

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See detailThe nuclear physics of OHe
Cudell, Jean-René ULg; Khlopov, Maxim; Wallemacq, Quentin ULg

in Mankoc (Ed.) Proceedings of the 15th Bled Workshop "What Comes Beyond the Standard Models" (2012, November 24)

A recent composite-dark-matter scenario assumes that the dominant fraction of dark matter consists of O-helium (OHe) dark atoms, in which a lepton-like doubly charged particle O is bound with a primordial ... [more ▼]

A recent composite-dark-matter scenario assumes that the dominant fraction of dark matter consists of O-helium (OHe) dark atoms, in which a lepton-like doubly charged particle O is bound with a primordial helium nucleus. It liberates the physics of dark matter from unknown features of new physics, but it demands a deep understanding of the details of known nuclear and atomic physics, which are still unclear. Here, we consider in detail the physics of the binding of OHe to various nuclei of interest for direct dark matter searches. We show that standard quantum mechanics leads to bound states in the keV region, but does not seem to provide a simple mechanism that stabilizes them. The crucial role of a barrier in the OHe-nucleus potential is confirmed for such a stabilization. [less ▲]

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See detailNuclear probes for battery materials investigations: Mössbauer spectroscopy, nuclear scattering, and neutron scattering
Hermann, Raphaël ULg; Mahmoud, A.; Brisbois, Magali ULg et al

in Proceedings of 2014 International Renewable and Sustainable Energy Conference, IRSEC 2014 (2014)

Selected examples of application of Mössbauer spectroscopy, nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation, and neutron scattering to battery and related materials research are presented. The ... [more ▼]

Selected examples of application of Mössbauer spectroscopy, nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation, and neutron scattering to battery and related materials research are presented. The charms of Mössbauer spectroscopy as a technique for screening materials, for detailed structure investigations, and for in situ measurements are illustrated. New developments of nuclear resonance scattering for isotopes with 30-90 keV resonant energy are presented. Structural, diffusive and dynamic studies utilizing neutron scattering are exemplified. © 2014 IEEE. [less ▲]

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See detailNuclear spin temperature of ammonia in Comet 9P/Tempel 1 before and after the Deep Impact event
Kawakita, Hideyo; Jehin, Emmanuel ULg; Manfroid, Jean ULg et al

in Icarus (2007), 187

The Deep Impact mission succeeded in excavating inner materials from the nucleus of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 on 2005 July 04 (at 05:52 UT). Comet 9P/Tempel 1 is one of Jupiter family short period comets, which ... [more ▼]

The Deep Impact mission succeeded in excavating inner materials from the nucleus of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 on 2005 July 04 (at 05:52 UT). Comet 9P/Tempel 1 is one of Jupiter family short period comets, which might originate in the Kuiper belt region in the solar nebula. In order to characterize the comet and to support the mission from the ground-based observatory, optical high-dispersion spectroscopic observations were carried out with the echelle spectrograph (UVES) mounted on the 8-m telescope VLT (UT2) before and after the Deep Impact event. Ortho-to-para abundance ratios (OPRs) of cometary ammonia were determined from the NH[SUB]2[/SUB] emission spectra. The OPRs of ammonia on July 3.996 UT and 4.997 UT were derived to be 1.28±0.07 (nuclear spin temperature: T[SUB][/SUB]=24±2 K) and 1.26±0.08 (T[SUB][/SUB]=25±2 K), respectively. There is no significant change between before and after the impact. Actually, most materials ejected from the impact site could have moved away from the nucleus on July 4.997 UT, about 17 h after the impact. However, a small fraction of the ejected materials might remain in the slit of UVES instrument at that time because an excess of about 20% in the NH[SUB]2[/SUB] emission flux is observed above the normal activity level was found [Manfroid, J., Hutsemékers, D., Jehin, E., Cochran, A.L., Arpigny, C., Jackson, W.M., Meech, K.J., Schulz, R., Zucconi, J.-M., 2007. Icarus. This issue]. If the excess of NH[SUB]2[/SUB] on July 04.997 UT was produced from icy materials excavated by the Deep Impact, then an upper-limit of the ammonia OPR would be 1.75 (T[SUB][/SUB]>17 K) for those materials. On the other hand, the OPR of ammonia produced from the quiescent sources was similar to that of the Oort cloud comets observed so far. This fact may imply that physical conditions where cometary ices formed were similar between Comet 9P/Tempel 1 and the Oort cloud comets. [less ▲]

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See detailNuclear spin temperature of ammonia in Comet 9P/Tempel 1 before and after the Deep Impact event
Kawakita, Hideyo; Jehin, Emmanuel ULg; Manfroid, Jean ULg et al

in Icarus: International Journal of Solar System Studies (2007), 191

The Deep Impact mission succeeded in excavating inner materials from the nucleus of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 on 2005 July 04 (at 05:52 UT). Comet 9P/Tempel 1 is one of Jupiter family short period comets, which ... [more ▼]

The Deep Impact mission succeeded in excavating inner materials from the nucleus of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 on 2005 July 04 (at 05:52 UT). Comet 9P/Tempel 1 is one of Jupiter family short period comets, which might originate in the Kuiper belt region in the solar nebula. In order to characterize the comet and to support the mission from the ground-based observatory, optical high-dispersion spectroscopic observations were carried out with the echelle spectrograph (UVES) mounted on the 8-m telescope VLT (UT2) before and after the Deep Impact event. Ortho-to-para abundance ratios (OPRs) of cometary ammonia were determined from the NH[SUB]2[/SUB] emission spectra. The OPRs of ammonia on July 3.996 UT and 4.997 UT were derived to be 1.28±0.07 (nuclear spin temperature: T[SUB][/SUB]=24±2 K) and 1.26±0.08 (T[SUB][/SUB]=25±2 K), respectively. There is no significant change between before and after the impact. Actually, most materials ejected from the impact site could have moved away from the nucleus on July 4.997 UT, about 17 h after the impact. However, a small fraction of the ejected materials might remain in the slit of UVES instrument at that time because an excess of about 20% in the NH[SUB]2[/SUB] emission flux is observed above the normal activity level was found [Manfroid, J., Hutsemékers, D., Jehin, E., Cochran, A.L., Arpigny, C., Jackson, W.M., Meech, K.J., Schulz, R., Zucconi, J.-M., 2007. Icarus. This issue]. If the excess of NH[SUB]2[/SUB] on July 04.997 UT was produced from icy materials excavated by the Deep Impact, then an upper-limit of the ammonia OPR would be 1.75 (T[SUB][/SUB]>17 K) for those materials. On the other hand, the OPR of ammonia produced from the quiescent sources was similar to that of the Oort cloud comets observed so far. This fact may imply that physical conditions where cometary ices formed were similar between Comet 9P/Tempel 1 and the Oort cloud comets. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (14 ULg)