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Peer Reviewed
See detailPeriodontal infections as potential risk factors for coronary heart diseases
Geerts, Sabine ULg; Legrand, Victor; Rompen, Eric ULg

Poster (1997)

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See detailPeriodontitis as potential risk factor for coronary heart disease
Geerts, Sabine ULg; Legrand, Victor; Rompen, Eric ULg

in Journal of Dental Research (1998), 77

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See detailPeriodontitis as potential risk factor for coronary heart disease
Geerts, Sabine ULg; Nys, Monique; Legrand, Victor et al

Poster (1999)

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See detailPeriodontitis as potential risk factor for coronary heart disease
Geerts, Sabine ULg; Legrand, Victor; Rompen, Eric ULg

Poster (1998)

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See detailPerioperative management of a child with von Willebrand disease undergoing surgical repair of craniosynostosis: looking at unusual targets.
Maquoi, Isabelle ULg; Bonhomme, Vincent ULg; Born, Jacques Daniel et al

in Anesthesia and Analgesia (2009), 109(3), 720-4

We report the successful management of a craniosynostosis repair in a child with severe Type I von Willebrand disease diagnosed during the preoperative assessment and treated by coagulation factor VIII ... [more ▼]

We report the successful management of a craniosynostosis repair in a child with severe Type I von Willebrand disease diagnosed during the preoperative assessment and treated by coagulation factor VIII and ristocetin cofactor. Collaboration among the anesthesiologist, the neurosurgeon, the clinical pathologist, and the pediatric hematologist is important for successful management. [less ▲]

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See detailPeriotontitis as a risk factor for coronary heart disease
Geerts, Sabine ULg; Nys, Monique; Legrand, Victor et al

Poster (1999)

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See detailPeripheral "chicken" obestatin administration does not affect feed intake and gut muscle contractility of meat-type and layer-type chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus).
Song, Zhigang; Verhulst, Pieter-Jan; Ansari, Zarbakht et al

in Regulatory peptides (2012), 177(1-3), 60-7

Obestatin has recently been discovered in the rat stomach. As for ghrelin, the 23-amino acid obestatin is also derived from post-translational processing of the prepro-ghrelin gene but seems to have ... [more ▼]

Obestatin has recently been discovered in the rat stomach. As for ghrelin, the 23-amino acid obestatin is also derived from post-translational processing of the prepro-ghrelin gene but seems to have opposite effects on feed intake. In avian species, ghrelin is mainly present in the proventriculus and decreases feed intake, as opposed to its orexigenic properties in mammals. An obestatin-like sequence was also found in the avian ghrelin precursor protein but the potential involvement of this peptide in appetite regulation of chickens is unclear. We therefore investigated the effects of a single peripheral administration of this predicted "chicken" obestatin peptide on voluntary feed intake of 7- to 9-day-old meat-type and layer-type chicks. "Chicken" obestatin was injected intraperitoneally or intravenously at a dose of 1 nmol or 10 nmol/100 g body weight and feed intake was measured up to 4 h post injection. None of these treatments did reveal any effect of the putative "chicken" obestatin on appetite of either meat-type of layer-type chicks. Furthermore, "chicken" obestatin also failed to affect the in vitro contractility of muscle strips from crop and proventriculus. In conclusion, in the given experimental settings, the putative "chicken" obestatin has indistinctive physiological effects on feed intake and in vitro muscle contractility of gut segments, and hence its functional properties in ingestive behavior of avian species remain obscure. [less ▲]

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See detailThe peripheral analgesic effects of opiods
Joris, Jean ULg; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

in APS Journal (1993), 2(1), 51-59

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See detailPeripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) ligand cytotoxicity unrelated to PBR expression
Hans, Grégory ULg; Wislet, Sabine ULg; Lallemend, François et al

in Biochemical Pharmacology (2005), 69(5), 819-830

Some synthetic ligands of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), an 18 kDa protein of the outer mitochondrial membrane, are cytotoxic for several tumor cell lines and arise as promising ... [more ▼]

Some synthetic ligands of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), an 18 kDa protein of the outer mitochondrial membrane, are cytotoxic for several tumor cell lines and arise as promising chemotherapeutic candidates. However, conflicting results were reported regarding the actual effect of these drugs on cellular survival ranging from protection to toxicity. Moreover, the concentrations needed to observe such a toxicity were usually high, far above the affinity range for their receptor, hence questioning its specificity. In the present study, we have shown that micromolar concentrations of FGIN-1-27 And Ro 5-4864, two chemically unrelated PBR ligands are toxic for both PBR-expressing SK-N-BE neuroblastoma cells and PBR-deficient Jurkat lymphoma cells. We have thereby demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of these drugs is unrelated to their PBR-binding activity. Moreover, Ro 54864-induced cell death differed strikingly between both cell types, being apoptotic in Jurkat cells while necrotic in SK-N-BE cells. Again, this did not seem to be related to PBR expression since Ro 5-4864-induced death of PBR-transfected Jurkat cells remained apoptotic. Taken together, our results show that PBR is unlikely to mediate all the effects of these PBR ligands. They however confirm that some of these ligands are very effective cytotoxic drugs towards various cancer cells, even for reputed chemoresistant tumors such as neuroblastoma, and, surprisingly, also for PBR-lacking tumor cells. (C) 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailPeripheral blood B-cell death compensates for excessive proliferation in lymphoid tissues and maintains homeostasis in bovine leukemia virus-infected sheep.
Debacq, Christophe; Gillet, Nicolas ULg; Asquith, Becca et al

in Journal of Virology (2006), 80(19), 9710-9719

The size of a lymphocyte population is primarily determined by a dynamic equilibrium between cell proliferation and death. Hence, lymphocyte recirculation between the peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues ... [more ▼]

The size of a lymphocyte population is primarily determined by a dynamic equilibrium between cell proliferation and death. Hence, lymphocyte recirculation between the peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues is a key determinant in the maintenance of cell homeostasis. Insights into these mechanisms can be gathered from large-animal models, where lymphatic cannulation from individual lymph nodes is possible. In this study, we assessed in vivo lymphocyte trafficking in bovine leukemia virus (BLV)-infected sheep. With a carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester labeling technique, we demonstrate that the dynamics of lymphocyte recirculation is unaltered but that accelerated proliferation in the lymphoid tissues is compensated for by increased death in the peripheral blood cell population. Lymphocyte homeostasis is thus maintained by biphasic kinetics in two distinct tissues, emphasizing a very dynamic process during BLV infection. [less ▲]

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See detailPeripheral blood progenitor cell collections in cancer patients: analysis of factors affecting the yields.
Sautois, Brieuc ULg; Fraipont, V.; Baudoux, Etienne ULg et al

in Haematologica (1999), 84(4), 342-9

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) are now widely used to restore hematopoiesis following high dose chemotherapy in patients with malignancies. We sought to identify ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) are now widely used to restore hematopoiesis following high dose chemotherapy in patients with malignancies. We sought to identify parameters that could predict the yield of PBPC after mobilization with chemotherapy (CT) with or without granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in cancer patients. DESIGN AND METHODS: One hundred and fifty patients underwent 627 PBPC collections during the recovery phase following CT with (n = 469) or without (n = 142) G-CSF. Hemogram, CFC-assays and CD34+ cell count were performed on peripheral blood and leukaphereses products. After log transformation of the data, differences between groups were assessed with the unpaired t-test or one-way analysis of variance. RESULTS: Seventeen and two patients required 2 and 3 mobilization cycles respectively to reach our target of 15x10(4) CFU-GM/kg. In patients with lymphoma but not in those with leukemia, the yields of both CFU-GM and CD34+ cells/kg were dramatically increased when G-CSF was added to CT for mobilization. In collections primed with CT and G-CSF, better yields were obtained in patients with breast cancer or small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) as opposed to other solid tumors and leukemia. Among potential predictive factors of CT- and G-CSF-primed harvests, we found that the CD34+ cell count in peripheral blood (PB) was strongly correlated with both the CFU-GM and CD34+ cell yields. Except in leukemia patients, more than 1x10(6) CD34+ cells/kg were harvested when the CD34+ cell count in blood was above 20x10(6)/L. Similarly, better results were obtained in collections performed when the percentage of myeloid progenitors in blood on the day of apheresis was above 5 % or when the leukocyte count in blood was above 5x10(9)/L. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: A diagnosis of breast cancer or SCLC, a leukocyte count in PB of more than 5x10(9)/L, more than 5% myeloid progenitors or more than 20x10(6) CD34+ cells/L in PB were associated with higher yields of PBPC in collections mobilized with CT+G-CSF. [less ▲]

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See detailPeripheral blood stem cell contamination in mantle cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: the case for purging?
Jacquy, Caroline; Lambert, Frédéric ULg; Soree, A. et al

in Bone Marrow Transplantation (1999), 23(7), 681-6

Intensification using peripheral blood stem cells collected after chemotherapy followed by growth factors is being increasingly investigated as an alternative to conventional chemotherapy for mantle cell ... [more ▼]

Intensification using peripheral blood stem cells collected after chemotherapy followed by growth factors is being increasingly investigated as an alternative to conventional chemotherapy for mantle cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We investigated 14 grades III-IV, t(11;14)-positive cases for contamination of PBSC collected after a polychemotherapy regimen followed by G-CSF. Patients were first treated with a polychemotherapy regimen. There were four CR, seven PR, two refractory and one early death. Seven patients have been transplanted, in whom PBSC were mobilized, using either cyclophosphamide/VP16 or Dexa-BEAM followed by G-CSF. For all patients, whether actually autografted or not, PB cells were tested at the time of regeneration on G-CSF after the first polychemotherapy or after the mobilizing regimen. PCR evaluation of contamination was performed first by a semi-quantitative approach, using serial dilutions of initial DNA, then confirmed using a limiting-dilution analysis. Two patients were not informative (one early death and one without an available molecular marker). PB cells collected at regeneration contained at least one log more lymphoma cells than steady-state blood or marrow, apart from in two cases. Moreover, where a mobilizing treatment diminished tumor burden in the patient, at the same time it increased PB contamination in most cases. We conclude that advanced mantle cell NHL appears to be largely resistant to significant in vivo purging by conventional chemotherapy. Where treatment brings benefits by reducing tumor load, it may at the same time negate it by mobilizing malignant cells into the collections used to intensify. Although the clonogenic potential of this massive infiltration is unknown (only gene marking studies could provide a definitive answer regarding the source of relapses), strategies aimed at reducing the level of contamination in the graft should be considered when designing future protocols. [less ▲]

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See detailPeripheral Nerve Regeneration Using Bioresorbable Macroporous Polylactide Scaffolds
Maquet, Véronique; Martin, Didier ULg; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg et al

in Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, Part A (2000), 52(4), 639-51

The ability of DRG-derived neurons to survive and attach onto macroporous polylactide (PLA) foams was assessed in vitro. The foams were fabricated using a thermally induced polymer-solvent phase ... [more ▼]

The ability of DRG-derived neurons to survive and attach onto macroporous polylactide (PLA) foams was assessed in vitro. The foams were fabricated using a thermally induced polymer-solvent phase separation. Two types of pore structures, namely oriented or interconnected pores, can be produced, depending on the mechanism of phase separation, which in turn can be predicted by the thermodynamics of the polymer-solvent pair. Coating of the porous foams with polyvinylalcohol (PVA) considerably improved the wettability of the foams and allowed for cell culture. The in vitro biocompatibility of the PVA-coated supports was demonstrated by measuring cell viability and neuritogenesis. Microscopic observations of the cells seeded onto the polymer foams showed that the interconnected pore networks were more favorable to cell attachment than the anisotropic ones. The capacity of highly oriented foams to support in vivo peripheral nerve regeneration was studied in rats. A sciatic nerve gap of 5-mm length was bridged with a polymer implant showing macrotubes of 100 microm diameter. At 4 weeks postoperatively, the polymer implant was still present. It was well integrated and had restored an anatomic continuity. An abundant cell migration was observed at the outer surface of the polymer implant, but not within the macrotubes. This dense cellular microenvironment was found to be favorable for axogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailPeripheral nerve stimulation in chronic cluster headache.
MAGIS, Delphine ULg; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Progress in Neurological Surgery (2011), 24

Cluster headache is well known as one of the most painful primary neurovascular headache. Since 1% of chronic cluster headache patients become refractory to all existing pharmacological treatments ... [more ▼]

Cluster headache is well known as one of the most painful primary neurovascular headache. Since 1% of chronic cluster headache patients become refractory to all existing pharmacological treatments, various invasive and sometimes mutilating procedures have been tempted in the last decades. Recently, neurostimulation methods have raised new hope for drug-resistant chronic cluster headache patients. The main focus of this chapter is on stimulation of the great occipital nerve, which has been the best evaluated peripheral nerve stimulation technique in drug-resistant chronic cluster headache, providing the most convincing results so far. Other peripheral nerve stimulation approaches used for this indication are also reviewed in detail. Although available studies are limited to a relatively small number of patients and placebo-controlled trials are lacking, existent clinical data suggest that occipital nerve stimulation should nonetheless be recommended for intractable chronic cluster headache patients before more invasive deep brain stimulation surgery. More studies are needed to evaluate the usefulness of supraorbital nerve stimulation and of vagus nerve stimulation in management of cluster headaches. [less ▲]

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See detailPeripheral Synergism Between Tramadol and Ibuprofen in the Formalin Test
Chavarria Bolanos, Daniel ULg; Perez-Urizar, Jose; Grandfils, Christian ULg et al

in Drug Development Research (2014), 75(4), 224-230

Analgesics with different mechanisms of action can be combined in order to obtain Pharmacological synergism, employing lower doses of each agent, thus diminishing side effects. For instance, an atypical ... [more ▼]

Analgesics with different mechanisms of action can be combined in order to obtain Pharmacological synergism, employing lower doses of each agent, thus diminishing side effects. For instance, an atypical dual analgesic such as tramadol (TMD) and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug such as ibuprofen (IBU) are good candidates to be evaluated when combined and applied peripherally. The present study was conducted to evaluate possible local synergism between TMD and IBU when combined peripherally using the formalin test in rats. The effects of the individual analgesics and their combinations were evaluated simultaneously using a 5% formalin dilution. Dose–effect curves were determined for TMD (50–400 μg/paw) and IBU (1–100 μg/paw). Experimental effective doses were evaluated and isobolographic analyses were constructed to evaluate TMD-IBU combination synergism. Both drugs produced a dose-dependent analgesic effect when applied separately. Isobolographic analysis showed synergism during phase 1 (0–10 min) and phase 2 (15–60 min) when compared with theoretical doses (P < 0.05), with interaction indexes of 0.06 and 0.09, respectively. The present information supports the peripheral analgesic effect of TMD and IBU, especially when combined at appropriate doses. [less ▲]

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See detailPeripheral T-cell lymphoma with t(6;14)(p25;q11.2) translocation presenting with massive splenomegaly.
SOMJA, Joan ULg; Bisig, B.; de Leval, L. et al

in Virchows Archiv : An International Journal of Pathology (2014)

Recurrent chromosomal translocations associated to peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) are rare. Here, we report a case of PTCL, not otherwise specified (NOS) with the karyotype 46,Y,add(X)(p22),t(6;14 ... [more ▼]

Recurrent chromosomal translocations associated to peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) are rare. Here, we report a case of PTCL, not otherwise specified (NOS) with the karyotype 46,Y,add(X)(p22),t(6;14)(p25;q11) and FISH-proved breakpoints in the IRF4 and TCRAD loci, leading to juxtaposition of both genes. A 64-year-old male patient presented with mild cytopenias and massive splenomegaly. Splenectomy showed diffuse red pulp involvement by a pleomorphic medium- to large-cell T-cell lymphoma with a CD2+ CD3+ CD5− CD7− CD4+ CD8+/− CD30− TCRbeta-F1+ immunophenotype, an activated cytotoxic profile, and strong MUM1 expression. The clinical course was marked by disease progression in the bone marrow under treatment and death at 4 months. In contrast with two t(6;14)(p25;q11.2)-positive lymphomas previously reported to be cytotoxic PTCL, NOS with bone marrow and skin involvement, this case was manifested by massive splenomegaly, expanding the clinical spectrum of PTCLs harboring t(6;14)(p25;q11.2) and supporting consideration of this translocation as a marker of biological aggressiveness. [less ▲]

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See detailPeripheral vascular surgery: Update on the perioperative non-surgical management for high cardiac risk patients
Stammet, P.; Senard, Marc ULg; Roediger, Laurence ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2003), 103(3), 248-254

This review of the recent literature regarding perioperative management in peripheral vascular surgery emphasizes some of the important features for the 2003 state-of-the-art on non surgical perioperative ... [more ▼]

This review of the recent literature regarding perioperative management in peripheral vascular surgery emphasizes some of the important features for the 2003 state-of-the-art on non surgical perioperative care for these high cardiac risk patients. The most adapted preoperative cardiac evaluation for each patient is guided by its individual risk factors and clinical history. Perioperative medication should nowadays consist of pre- and postoperative beta-blockers and acetyl salicylic acid, both reducing cardiac morbidity and mortality. Neuraxial locoregional anaesthesia techniques are reasonable alternatives to general anaesthesia because of their potential advantages, by reducing postoperative inflammatory response and reducing procoagulating activity, and increasing peripheral vascular graft patency, but the individual benefit/risk balance has always to be evaluated for patients submitted to aggressive antithrombotic therapy. During the postoperative course, early detection and treatment of postoperative myocardial ischemia or infarction by ST wave changes and/or cardiac enzyme control has to be considered. [less ▲]

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See detailLe périple et la boucle : Au seul souci de voyager…
Durand, Pascal ULg

in Diaz J.-L. (Ed.) Les Poésies de Stéphane Mallarmé. Une rose dans les ténèbres (1998)

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See detailPeripubertal proliferation of progenitor cells in the preoptic area of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica).
Mouriec, Karen; Balthazart, Jacques ULg

in Brain research (2013), 1516

Brain structures related to reproduction are thought to depend on the action of gonadal steroids acting either during early life (organizing irreversible effects) or adulthood (activating transient ... [more ▼]

Brain structures related to reproduction are thought to depend on the action of gonadal steroids acting either during early life (organizing irreversible effects) or adulthood (activating transient effects). More recently puberty has become a focus of attention and it was demonstrated that action of sex steroid hormones at this time plays a critical role in the final organization of brain and behavior. We studied by BrdU immunohistochemistry the ontogeny from hatching to sexual maturity of a previously identified cell population in the preoptic area labeled by a BrdU injection at the end of embryonic period (E12) of sexual differentiation in male and female Japanese quail. After an initial increase between E12 and hatching, the density of BrdU-immunoreactive cells decreased until the beginning of puberty but then increased again during sexual maturation in the caudal preoptic area specifically. Divisions of these cells took place in the brain parenchyma as indicated by the large numbers of pairs of labeled cells. No sex difference affecting these processes could be detected at any stage of development. Large numbers of new cells thus arise around puberty in the caudal preoptic area and presumably contribute to the reorganization of this structure that precedes the emergence of adult reproductive behaviors. [less ▲]

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