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See detailNonradial nonadiabatic stellar pulsations: A numerical method and its application to a beta Cephei model
Dupret, Marc-Antoine ULg

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2001), 366

A new general method for the computation of nonradial nonadiabatic oscillations of a given stellar model is presented for a linear approximation. A simple and useful modelling of the atmosphere is ... [more ▼]

A new general method for the computation of nonradial nonadiabatic oscillations of a given stellar model is presented for a linear approximation. A simple and useful modelling of the atmosphere is included, allowing to obtain credible values for the eigenfunctions in the atmosphere. Some of the results obtained for a 10 M[SUB]sun[/SUB] model are shown as an illustration. Our study opens the way to different applications. Better theoretical line-profile variations could be obtained from our method, allowing a more detailed comparison with observations. More generally, our study is relevant for asteroseismology, giving a way for a better knowledge of stellar interiors. [less ▲]

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See detailNonradial oscillations of solar models with an initial discontinuity in hydrogen abundance
Boury, A.; Scuflaire, Richard ULg; Noels-Grötsch, Arlette ULg et al

in Hill, H. A.; Dziembowski, W. A. (Eds.) Nonradial and Nonlinear Stellar Pulsation: Proceedings of a Workshop Held at the University of Arizona in Tucson, March 12 – 16, 1979 (1980)

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See detailNonrenal disease activity following mycophenolate mofetil or intravenous cyclophosphamide as induction treatment for lupus nephritis: findings in a multicenter, prospective, randomized, open-label, parallel-group clinical trial
Ginzler, Ellen M; Wofsy, David; Isenberg, David et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2010), 62(1), 211-221

OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of mycophenolate mofetil compared with intravenous pulses of cyclophosphamide on the nonrenal manifestations of lupus nephritis. METHODS: Patients with active lupus ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of mycophenolate mofetil compared with intravenous pulses of cyclophosphamide on the nonrenal manifestations of lupus nephritis. METHODS: Patients with active lupus nephritis (renal biopsy class III, IV, or V) were recruited for the study (n = 370) and treated with mycophenolate mofetil (target dosage 3 gm/day) or intravenous cyclophosphamide (0.5-1.0 gm/m(2)/month), plus tapered prednisone, for 24 weeks. Nonrenal outcomes were determined using measures of whole body disease activity, including the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) disease activity index, the Safety of Estrogens in Lupus Erythematosus: National Assessment (SELENA) version of the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI), and immunologic variables. RESULTS: Both treatments were effective on whole body disease activity in the systems examined, as indicated by changes in the classic BILAG index. With either treatment, remission was induced, notably in the mucocutaneous, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular/respiratory, and vasculitis systems, and flares were rare, as measured by the SELENA-SLEDAI. Levels of complement C3, C4, and CH50 and titers of anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies were normalized after treatment with either mycophenolate mofetil or intravenous cyclophosphamide. CONCLUSION: In addition to the efficacy of both treatments on the renal system, this analysis showed that remission could also be induced in other systems. There was no clear difference in efficacy between mycophenolate mofetil and intravenous cyclophosphamide in ameliorating either the renal or nonrenal manifestations. Mycophenolate mofetil is, therefore, a suitable alternative to cyclophosphamide for the treatment of renal and nonrenal disease manifestations in patients with biopsy-proven lupus nephritis. [less ▲]

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See detailNonresponsive Generalized Bacterial Infection Associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in a Beauceron
Clercx, Cécile ULg; Mc Entee, Kathleen ULg; Gilbert, S. et al

in Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association (1999), 35(3, May-Jun), 220222224-8

A case of concurrent canine systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and generalized bacterial infection in a six-year-old female Beauceron is reported. The dog presented with purulent nasal and ocular ... [more ▼]

A case of concurrent canine systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and generalized bacterial infection in a six-year-old female Beauceron is reported. The dog presented with purulent nasal and ocular discharges, skin lesions (including seborrhea, hyperkeratotic areas, and papules as well as ecchymoses around the eyes, on both sides of the pinnae, and on the vulva), generalized lymph node enlargement, a mitral murmur, and lameness. Later, facial swelling, a retrobulbar abscess, and a cough also developed. Occurrence of a generalized bacterial infection was established by culture of group-C, beta-hemolytic Streptococcus from the throat, the mouth, a biopsy site (popliteal lymph node area), the retrobulbar abscess, and the lung. The diagnosis of SLE was based on the clinical signs and particularly on the occurrence of antinuclear antibody (ANA) and antidoublestranded-desoxyribonucleic acid (ds-DNA) antibody. Interestingly, the latter type of antibodies were also detected in two young female puppies whelped by this dog. Salient histological findings included an extreme cell depletion of the lymph nodes and spleen and severe pneumonitis and peribronchiolitis. The results of this case indicate that a definite diagnosis of canine SLE can, at times, be made on the basis of the presence of serum ANA and ds-DNA antibodies. [less ▲]

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See detailNonribosomal peptides producing strains isolated from Bikalga and Soumbala fermented condiments of Burkina Faso
Savadogo, Aly; Chollet, Marlène; Tapi, Arthur et al

Conference (2009)

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See detailNonrigid registration and multimodality image fusion for 3D image-guided neurochirurgical planning and navigation
Verly, Jacques ULg; Vigneron, Lara M.; Petitjean, Nicolas et al

Conference (2004)

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See detailNonrigid registration and multimodality image fusion for 3D image-guided neurosurgery
Verly, Jacques ULg; Vigneron, Lara M.; Mercenier, Julien et al

Conference (2004)

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See detailA nonsense mutation in cGMP-dependent type II protein kinase (PRKG2) causes dwarfism in American Angus cattle.
Koltes, James E; Mishra, Bishnu P; Kumar, Dinesh et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2009), 106(46), 19250-5

Historically, dwarfism was the major genetic defect in U.S. beef cattle. Aggressive culling and sire testing were used to minimize its prevalence; however, neither of these practices can eliminate a ... [more ▼]

Historically, dwarfism was the major genetic defect in U.S. beef cattle. Aggressive culling and sire testing were used to minimize its prevalence; however, neither of these practices can eliminate a recessive genetic defect. We assembled a 4-generation pedigree to identify the mutation underlying dwarfism in American Angus cattle. An adaptation of the Elston-Steward algorithm was used to overcome small pedigree size and missing genotypes. The dwarfism locus was fine-mapped to BTA6 between markers AFR227 and BM4311. Four candidate genes were sequenced, revealing a nonsense mutation in exon 15 of cGMP-dependant type II protein kinase (PRKG2). This C/T transition introduced a stop codon (R678X) that truncated 85 C-terminal amino acids, including a large portion of the kinase domain. Of the 75 mutations discovered in this region, only this mutation was 100% concordant with the recessive pattern of inheritance in affected and carrier individuals (log of odds score = 6.63). Previous research has shown that PRKG2 regulates SRY (sex-determining region Y) box 9 (SOX9)-mediated transcription of collagen 2 (COL2). We evaluated the ability of wild-type (WT) or R678X PRKG2 to regulate COL2 expression in cell culture. Real-time PCR results confirmed that COL2 is overexpressed in cells that overexpressed R678X PRKG2 as compared with WT PRKG2. Furthermore, COL2 and COL10 mRNA expression was increased in dwarf cattle compared with unaffected cattle. These experiments indicate that the R678X mutation is functional, resulting in a loss of PRKG2 regulation of COL2 and COL10 mRNA expression. Therefore, we present PRKG2 R678X as a causative mutation for dwarfism cattle. [less ▲]

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See detailA nonsmooth generalized-alpha scheme for flexible multibody systems with unilateral constraints
Chen, Qiong-zhong; Acary, Vincent; Virlez, Geoffrey ULg et al

in International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering (2013), 96(8), 487-511

Mechanical systems are usually subjected not only to bilateral constraints but also to unilateral constraints. Inspired by the generalized-alpha time integration method for smooth flexible multibody ... [more ▼]

Mechanical systems are usually subjected not only to bilateral constraints but also to unilateral constraints. Inspired by the generalized-alpha time integration method for smooth flexible multibody dynamics, this paper presents a nonsmooth generalized-alpha method, which allows a consistent treatment of the nonsmooth phenomena induced by unilateral constraints and an accurate description of the structural vibrations during free motions. Both the algorithm and the implementation are illustrated in detail. Numerical example tests are given in the scope of both rigid and flexible body models, taking account for both linear and nonlinear systems, and comprising both unilateral and bilateral constraints. The extended nonsmooth generalized-alpha method is verified through comparison to the traditional Moreau-Jean method and the fully implicit Newmark method. Results show that the nonsmooth generalized-alpha method benefits from the accuracy and stability property of the classical generalized-alpha method with controllable numerical damping. In particular, when it comes to the analysis of flexible systems, the nonsmooth generalized-alpha method shows much better accuracy property than the other two methods. [less ▲]

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See detailNonspecific airway responsiveness of COPD horses : effects of environmental control
Vandenput, Sandrina ULg; Votion, Dominique ULg; Anciaux, N. et al

in Pflügers Archiv : European Journal of Physiology (1996), 431(6), 324

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See detailNonthermal O(1S) and O(1D) populations in cometary atmospheres
Hubert, Benoît ULg; Bisikalo, D.V.; Shematovich, V.I. et al

Conference (2013, December)

Recent developments in the field of cometary science have motivated many studies dealing with the nucleus composition and mineralogy, and also with the photochemistry of the coma. In particular, ground ... [more ▼]

Recent developments in the field of cometary science have motivated many studies dealing with the nucleus composition and mineralogy, and also with the photochemistry of the coma. In particular, ground based observations have shown that the visible oxygen emissions at 557.7 and 630 nm, both belonging to the Rosetta-VIRTIS-M passband, present different line profiles, pointing to specific photochemical processes. In this work, we present a Monte Carlo simulation of the O(1D) and O(1S) photochemistry including photodissociation of H2O, CO2 and CO, quenching, collisional thermalization and radiative decay. The model solves Boltzmann's integro differential equation including sources and sinks, as well as a prescribed expansion velocity of the coma. The energy distribution functions (EDF's) of O(1S) and O(1D) are computed at cometocentric distances ranging between 10 and 5000 km. We find that the EDF's of both O(1D) and O(1S) are strongly nonthermal, up to a degree that sharply varies with cometocentric distance, as thermalization is less efficient when the density of the dominant species is reduced. It follows that the Doppler profile of the visible radiations emitted by both species is non-gaussian in a frame of reference moving with the expanding coma. The nonthermal volume emission rate is then integrated along a set of chosen line of sights, accounting for the explicit Doppler profiles derived from the EDF's as well as the expansion motion, and the Doppler profile of the full coma is computed. It appears that most of the line width is due to the expansion motion, although the detailed line shape remains sensitive to the nonthermal nature of the EDF's. Our computation can then be compared with the line profiles observed from the ground with the UVES spectrograph mounted on the ESO-VLT. [less ▲]

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See detailNonverbal deficits and interpersonnal regulation in alcoholics
Philippot, P; Kornreich, C; Blairy, Sylvie ULg

in Philippot, P; Coats, E; Feldman, R (Eds.) Nonvernal behavior in clinical context (2003)

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See detailNonvisual brain responses to light exposure in human as assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg

Doctoral thesis (2007)

La lumière influence profondément la physiologie humaine, en plus de permettre la vision. Elle constitue le synchronisateur principal des rythmes circadiens et induit des effets physiologiques immédiats ... [more ▼]

La lumière influence profondément la physiologie humaine, en plus de permettre la vision. Elle constitue le synchronisateur principal des rythmes circadiens et induit des effets physiologiques immédiats. Ces effets concernent des fonctions non-visuelles telles que la régulation du rythme veille/sommeil, de la température corporelle, de fonctions endocrinologiques, de l’éveil et des performances. Plusieurs études de ces effets réalisées chez l’animal et chez l’homme ont montré l’implication d’un système de photoréception non-visuel sensible surtout aux courtes longueurs d’onde (~470nm ; bleu). Ce système utilise les photorécepteurs classiques (cônes et bâtonnets), en plus de cellules ganglionnaires rétiniennes (CGR) intrinsèquement photosensibles, et exprimant la mélanopsine. Ces CGR se connectent à de nombreux noyaux sous-corticaux et corticaux, ce qui suggère un rôle du système non-visuel dans de nombreuses fonctions cérébrales. Cependant, au delà de ces projections rétiniennes directes, les autres régions du cerveau impliquées sont très peu connues. Une étude en tomographie par émission de positons (TEP), réalisée à l’Université de Liège, a démontré que l’effet éveillant d’une lumière nocturne intense (>8000lux) pouvait moduler l’activité cérébrale liée à une tâche attentionnelle. Cette étude, ainsi que quelques données d’EEG, résume notre connaissance des mécanismes cérébraux impliqués dans le système non-visuel chez l’homme. De plus, la majorité des études sur ces effets ont été entreprises la nuit. Nous avons réalisé trois études en imagerie fonctionnelle par résonance magnétique (IRMf) utilisant des expositions lumineuses diurnes pour mieux caractériser le système cérébral non-visuel chez l’homme. L’IRMf bénéficie d’une meilleure résolution spatiale et temporelle que la TEP et permet la caractérisation d’activités cérébrales liées à un processus cognitif précis. La première étude met en évidence des réponses cérébrales liées à une tâche attentionnelle avant et après une exposition lumineuse intense (>7000lux) de 21min. L’amélioration de l’éveil subjectif induite par la lumière est liée à une augmentation de l’activité thalamique. De plus, la lumière augmente l’activité d’un réseau de régions corticales impliquées dans la tâche, prévenant les diminutions d’activités observées en obscurité continue. Ces augmentations déclinent en quelques minutes après l’arrêt de la lumière, en suivant des dynamiques diverses spécifiques à chaque région. Ces premiers résultats suggèrent que, via une modulation de l’activité de structures sous-corticales régulant l’éveil, la lumière peut promouvoir dynamiquement l’activité corticale de réseaux impliqués dans un processus cognitif non-visuel. La deuxième étude montre que de courtes expositions (18min) à des lumières monochromatiques (3x1013ph/cm2/s) bleues (470nm) ou vertes (550nm) affectent différemment les réponses cérébrales liées à une tâche de mémoire de travail. La lumière bleue augmente les réponses cérébrales ou, du moins, prévient les diminutions observées sous lumière verte dans des cortex pariétaux et frontaux impliqués dans la mémoire de travail, ainsi que dans le thalamus. Ces résultats montrent qu’une lumière monochromatique peut rapidement influencer les fonctions cognitives et suggèrent que ces effets sont induits via un système de photoréception qui utilise la mélanopsine. Ces résultats démontrent qu’une exposition lumineuse diurne peut moduler l’activité cérébrale non-visuelle liée à deux fonctions cognitives complexes. La lumière agit rapidement en fonction de la région cérébrale et de la longueur d’onde considérées. Les sensibilités aux différentes longueurs d’ondes suggèrent l’implication d’un système de photoréception utilisant la mélanopsine. XXX. Les résultats suggèrent également une implication étendue de la lumière dans la régulation des fonctions cérébrales chez l’homme et soutiennent son utilisation pour contrecarrer la somnolence diurne et traiter des désordres circadiens et psychiatriques. [less ▲]

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See detailNonvisual responses to light exposure in the human brain during the circadian night
Perrin, Fabien; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Fuchs, Sonia ULg et al

in Current Biology (2004), 14(20), 1842-6

The brain processes light information to visually represent the environment but also to detect changes in ambient light level. The latter information induces non-image-forming responses and exerts ... [more ▼]

The brain processes light information to visually represent the environment but also to detect changes in ambient light level. The latter information induces non-image-forming responses and exerts powerful effects on physiology such as synchronization of the circadian clock and suppression of melatonin. In rodents, irradiance information is transduced from a discrete subset of photosensitive retinal ganglion cells via the retinohypothalamic tract to various hypothalamic and brainstem regulatory structures including the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei, the master circadian pacemaker. In humans, light also acutely modulates alertness, but the cerebral correlates of this effect are unknown. We assessed regional cerebral blood flow in 13 subjects attending to auditory and visual stimuli in near darkness following light exposures (>8000 lux) of different durations (0.5, 17, 16.5, and 0 min) during the biological night. The bright broadband polychromatic light suppressed melatonin and enhanced alertness. Functional imaging revealed that a large-scale occipito-parietal attention network, including the right intraparietal sulcus, was more active in proportion to the duration of light exposures preceding the scans. Activity in the hypothalamus decreased in proportion to previous illumination. These findings have important implications for understanding the effects of light on human behavior. [less ▲]

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See detailNonword repetition problems in children with specific language impairment: A deficit in accessing long-term linguistic representations?
Leclercq, Anne-Lise ULg; Maillart, Christelle ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg

in Topics in Language Disorders (2013), 33(3), 238-254

Children with specific language impairment (SLI) consistently show poor nonword repetition (NWR) performance. However, the reason for these difficulties remains a matter of intensive debate. Nonword ... [more ▼]

Children with specific language impairment (SLI) consistently show poor nonword repetition (NWR) performance. However, the reason for these difficulties remains a matter of intensive debate. Nonword repetition is a complex psycholinguistic task that heavily relies upon phonological segmentation and phonological knowledge, and even lexical knowledge. This study aims at investigating various linguistic factors that can be at the root of difficulties in children with Specific Language Impairment when repeating nonwords, with the goal of achieving a better understanding of the linguistic processes supporting nonword processing. Linguistic complexity was assessed by manipulating lexicality, syllabic complexity, and perceptual difficulty in NWR tasks. Fifteen children with Specific Language Impairment, 15 typically developing controls matched on both age and performance IQ, and 15 typically developing children matched on lexical knowledge participated in this study. Children with Specific Language Impairment performed overall more poorly than age- and IQ-matched children and lexical age-matched children. Importantly, children with Specific Language Impairment showed lower lexicality and syllabic complexity effects in their NWR performances. These results are compatible with difficulties to retrieve lexical and sublexical phonological knowledge in the context of NWR tasks. Copyright © 2013 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. [less ▲]

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See detailNoradrenergic control of auditory information processing in female canaries
Appeltants, D.; Del Negro, C.; Balthazart, Jacques ULg

in Behavioural Brain Research (2002), 133(2), 221-235

An ethological procedure, based on the study of the sexual responsiveness of female canaries (Serinus canaria) to song playbacks was used to investigate the function of central noradrenergic inputs in the ... [more ▼]

An ethological procedure, based on the study of the sexual responsiveness of female canaries (Serinus canaria) to song playbacks was used to investigate the function of central noradrenergic inputs in the processing of auditory information. The effects of a noradrenergic denervation on sexual responses was analyzed in females exposed to playbacks of biological relevant auditory stimuli, i.e. sexually stimulating songs, presented alone or masked by auditory distractors. A decrease in behavioral responsiveness was observed as a function of the amount of masking distractors indicating that female canaries have the perceptual ability to discriminate and selectively attend to biologically relevant songs. After the systemic administration of DSP-4, a specific noradrenergic neurotoxin, females exhibited an overall decrease in sexual responsiveness to songs masked or not by distractors. No effect of DSP-4 were detected on the motor activity nor on reproductive behaviors. These results indicate that central noradrenergic inputs modulate the sexual behavior of female canaries by affecting the auditory processing of relevant information contained in sexually stimulating songs. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Norberg angle revisited
Comhaire, F.; Criel, A.; Dassy, C. et al

in American Journal of Veterinary Research (2009), 70(2), 228-235

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See detailNorbert Elias : Vie, oeuvres, concepts
Ledent, David ULg

Book published by Ellipses (2009)

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See detailTHE NORDIC TEST SYSTEM FOR VOLTAGE STABILITY ASSESSMENT
Van Cutsem, Thierry ULg

Conference (2014, July)

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See detailNorepinephrine and ephedrine do not counteract the increase in cutaneous microcirculation induced by spinal anaesthesia.
Lecoq, Jean-Pierre ULg; Brichant, Jean-François ULg; Lamy, Maurice ULg et al

in British Journal of Anaesthesia (2010), 105(2), 214-9

BACKGROUND: /st> Neuraxial anaesthesia improves tissue perfusion and tissue oxygen tension. Vasodilation induced by this technique may result in hypotension requiring the administration of vasoactive ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: /st> Neuraxial anaesthesia improves tissue perfusion and tissue oxygen tension. Vasodilation induced by this technique may result in hypotension requiring the administration of vasoactive drugs. The use of peripheral vasoconstrictors might counteract the improved tissue perfusion and its potentially beneficial effects. We therefore investigated the effect of i.v. norepinephrine and ephedrine on skin perfusion using laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) in patients during spinal anaesthesia. METHODS: /st> Skin blood flow expressed in perfusion units (PU) provided by LDF was measured simultaneously at the foot and the manubrium levels in 44 patients during spinal anaesthesia with a sensory level below T5. Norepinephrine infusion was then titrated to normalize mean arterial pressure (MAP) in 23 patients (Group NOR). Ephedrine (max. 10 mg) was administered in 21 patients (Group EPH). Changes in relative PU were compared between the two sites of measurements in each group during drug administration. The same doses of norepinephrine were assessed in 11 normal volunteers to assure comparable vasoreactivity at the foot and manubrium levels. RESULTS: /st> Spinal anaesthesia resulted in a 10% decrease in MAP (P<0.001), an increase in relative PU values at the foot level (P<0.001), and a decrease at the sternum level (P<0.05). Norepinephrine and ephedrine produced a significant increase in relative PU values at the foot level when compared with the sternum level (NOR: P=0.02; EPH: P=0.0035). In volunteers, norepinephrine decreased cutaneous perfusion similarly at the manubrium and foot levels. CONCLUSIONS: /st> Improved skin perfusion induced by spinal anaesthesia was not counteracted by the use of norepinephrine or ephedrine. [less ▲]

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