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See detailA Novel Approach to Design Chitosan-Polyester Materials for Biomedical Applications
Akopova, Tatiana A.; Demina, Tatiana S.; Shchegolikhin, Alexander N. et al

in International Journal of Polymer Science (2012), 2012

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (3 ULg)
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See detailA novel approach to the study of familial influences on evoked cortical responses in migraine.
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Sandor, P. S.

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (1999), 19 Suppl 24

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See detailA novel aromatic-aliphatic copolyester of poly(ethylene-co-diethylene-terephthalate)-co-poly(L-lactic acid): Synthesis and characterization
Li, Jun; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Jian et al

in Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research (2010), 49(20), 9803-9810

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See detailNovel aspects of the pathogenesis of aneurysms of the abdominal aorta in humans.
Michel, Jérôme ULg; Martin-Ventura, J. L.; Egido, J. et al

in Cardiovascular Research (2011)

Aneurysm of the abdominal aorta (AAA) is a particular, specifically localized form of atherothrombosis, providing a unique human model of this disease. The pathogenesis of AAA is characterized by a ... [more ▼]

Aneurysm of the abdominal aorta (AAA) is a particular, specifically localized form of atherothrombosis, providing a unique human model of this disease. The pathogenesis of AAA is characterized by a breakdown of the extracellular matrix due to an excessive proteolytic activity, leading to potential arterial wall rupture. The roles of matrix metalloproteinases and plasmin generation in progression of AAA have been demonstrated both in animal models and in clinical studies. In the present review, we highlight recent studies addressing the role of the haemoglobin-rich, intraluminal thrombus and the adventitial response in the development of human AAA. The intraluminal thrombus exerts its pathogenic effect through platelet activation, fibrin formation, binding of plasminogen and its activators, and trapping of erythrocytes and neutrophils, leading to oxidative and proteolytic injury of the arterial wall. These events occur mainly at the intraluminal thrombus-circulating blood interface, and pathological mediators are conveyed outwards, where they promote matrix degradation of the arterial wall. In response, neo-angiogenesis, phagocytosis by mononuclear cells, and a shift from innate to adaptive immunity in the adventitia are observed. Abdominal aortic aneurysm thus represents an accessible spatiotemporal model of human atherothrombotic progression towards clinical events, the study of which should allow further understanding of its pathogenesis and the translation of pathogenic biological activities into diagnostic and therapeutic applications. [less ▲]

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See detailNovel association between vasoactive intestinal peptide and CRTH2 receptor in recruiting eosinophils: a possible biochemical mechanism for allergic eosinophilic inflammation of the airways.
EL SHAZLY, Amr ULg; Begon, Dominique ULg; KUSTERMANS, Gaëlle ULg et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2013), 288(2), 1374-84

We explored the relation between vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), CRTH2, and eosinophil recruitment. It is shown that CRTH2 expression by eosinophils from allergic rhinitis (AR) patients and ... [more ▼]

We explored the relation between vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), CRTH2, and eosinophil recruitment. It is shown that CRTH2 expression by eosinophils from allergic rhinitis (AR) patients and eosinophils cell line (Eol-1 cells) was up-regulated by VIP treatment. This was functional and resulted into exaggerated migratory response of cells against PGD2. Nasal challenge of AR patients resulted into significant increase of VIP contents in nasal secretion (ELISA), and the immunohistochemical studies of allergic nasal tissues, showed significant expression of VIP in association with intense eosinophil recruitment. Biochemical assays showed that VIP-induced eosinophils chemotaxis from AR patients and Eol-1 cells, was mediated through CRTH2 receptor. Cells migration against VIP was sensitive to protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) inhibition, but not to tyrosine kinase or P38 MAP-kinase inhibition, or calcium chelation. Western blot demonstrated a novel CRTH2 mediated cytosol to membrane translocation of PKC-epsilon, PKC-delta and PKA-alpha, gamma and IIalpha reg in Eol-1 cells upon stimulation with VIP. Confocal images and FACS demonstrated a strong association and co-localization between VIP peptide and CRTH2 molecules. Further, VIP induced PGD2 secretion from eosinophils. Our results demonstrate the first evidence of association between VIP and CRTH2 in recruiting eosinophils. [less ▲]

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See detailNovel Bacterial Isolate from Permian Groundwater, Capable of Aggregating Potential Biofuel-Producing Microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1
Wang, H; Laughinghouse IV, Haywood ULg; Anderson, MA et al

in Applied and Environmental Microbiology (2012), 78(5), 1445-1453

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See detailA Novel Bacteriocin With A Ygngv Motif From Vegetable-Associated Enterococcus Mundtii: Full Characterization And Interaction With Target Organisms
Bennik, Mhj.; Vanloo, B.; Brasseur, Robert ULg et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta-Biomembranes (1998), 1373(1), 47-58

A novel broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptide produced by vegetable-associated Enterococcus mundtii was purified and characterized, and designated mundticin. To our knowledge, this is the first report on ... [more ▼]

A novel broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptide produced by vegetable-associated Enterococcus mundtii was purified and characterized, and designated mundticin. To our knowledge, this is the first report on bacteriocin production by this organism. The elucidation of the full primary amino acid sequence of mundticin (KYYGNGVSCNKKGCSVDWGKAIGIIGNNSAANLATGGAAGWSK) revealed that this antimicrobial peptide belongs to the class IIa bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria which share a highly conserved N-terminal 'YGNGV' motif. Data obtained by computer modelling indicated an oblique orientation of the alpha-helical regions of mundticin and homologous class IIa bacteriocins at a hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface, which may play a role in the destabilization of phospholipid bilayers. The average mass of mundticin, as determined by electron spray mass spectrometry, was found to be 4287.21+/-0.59 Da. With respect to its biological activity, mundticin was shown to inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes, Clostridium botulinum and a variety of lactic acid bacteria. Moreover, it was demonstrated to have a bactericidal effect on L. monocytogenes as a result of the dissipation of the membrane potential, and a loss of intracellular ATP in absence of ATP leakage. Its good solubility in water, and its stability over a wide pH and temperature range indicate the potential of this broad spectrum bacteriocin as a natural preservation agent for foods. [less ▲]

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See detailNovel biocompatible coatings strongly adhering onto stainless steel and carbon fibers, endowed with antibacterial properties
Ignatova, Miléna; Labaye, David-Emmanuel; Voccia, Samuel et al

Poster (2003, May 16)

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See detailA novel biodegradable and biocompatible ceramer prepared by the sol-gel process
Tian, Dong; Dubois, Philippe ULg; Grandfils, Christian ULg et al

in Chemistry of Materials (1997), 9(4), 871-874

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See detailNovel biodegradable pH-sensitive flower micelle
Cajot, Sébastien ULg; Van Butsele, Kathy; Jérôme, Christine ULg

Poster (2008, May 22)

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See detailNovel bioresorbable and bioactive composites based on bioactive glass and polylactide foams for bone tissue engineering
Roether, J. A.; Gough, J. E.; Boccaccini, Aldo R. et al

in Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine (2002), 13(12), 1207-1214

Bioresorbable and bioactive tissue engineering scaffolds based on bioactive glass (45S5 Bioglass®) particles and macroporous poly(DL-lactide) (PDLLA) foams were fabricated. A slurry dipping technique in ... [more ▼]

Bioresorbable and bioactive tissue engineering scaffolds based on bioactive glass (45S5 Bioglass®) particles and macroporous poly(DL-lactide) (PDLLA) foams were fabricated. A slurry dipping technique in conjunction with pretreatment in ethanol was used to achieve reproducible and well adhering bioactive glass coatings of uniform thickness on the internal and external surfaces of the foams. In vitro studies in simulated body fluid (SBF) demonstrated rapid hydroxyapatite (HA) formation on the surface of the composites, indicating their bioactivity. For comparison, composite foams containing Bioglass® particles as filler for the polymer matrix (in concentration of up to 40 wt%) were prepared by freeze-drying, enabling homogenous glass particle distribution in the polymer matrix. The formation of HA on the composite surfaces after immersion in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) was investigated to confirm the bioactivity of the composites. Human osteoblasts (HOBs) were seeded onto as-fabricated PDLLA foams and onto PDLLA foams coated with Bioglass® particles to determine early cell attachment and spreading. Cells were observed to attach and spread on all surfaces after the first 90 min in culture. The results of this study indicate that the fabricated composite materials have potential as scaffolds for guided bone regeneration. (C) 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. [less ▲]

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See detailA novel bisphosphonate dosing regimen: once-monthly oral ibandronate
Cooper, C.; Adami, Silvio; Stepan, J. J. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2004, June)

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See detailA novel blueprint for "top down" differentiation defines the cervical squamocolumnar junction during development, reproductive life and neoplasia.
Herfs, Michael ULg; Vargas, Sara O.; Yamamoto, Yusuke et al

in Journal of Pathology (The) (2013), 229(3), 460-8

The cervical squamocolumnar (SC) junction is the site of a recently discovered "embryonic" cell population that was proposed as the cell of origin for cervical cancer and its precursors. How this ... [more ▼]

The cervical squamocolumnar (SC) junction is the site of a recently discovered "embryonic" cell population that was proposed as the cell of origin for cervical cancer and its precursors. How this population participates in cervical remodeling and neoplasia is unclear. In the present study, we analyzed the SC junction immunophenotype during pre and postnatal human and mouse development and in the adult, processes of metaplastic evolution of SC junction, microglandular change and early cervical neoplasia. Early in life, embryonic cervical epithelial cells were seen throughout the cervix and subsequently diminished in number to become concentrated at the SC junction in the adult. In all settings, there was a repetitive scenario in which cuboidal embryonic/SC junction cells gave rise to subjacent metaplastic basal/reserve cells with a switch from the SC junction positive to negative immunophenotype. This downward or basal (rather than upward or apical) evolution from progenitor cell to metaplastic progeny was termed reverse or "top down" differentiation. A similar pattern was noted in high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), suggesting HPV infection of the cuboidal SC junction cells initiated outgrowth of basally-oriented neoplastic progeny. The progressive loss of the embryonic/SC junction markers occurred with top-down differentiation during development, remodeling and early neoplasia. Interestingly, most low grade SILs were SC junction negative, implying infection of metaplastic progeny rather than the original SC junction cells. This proposed model of "top down" differentiation resolves the mystery of how SC junction cells both remodel the cervix and participate in neoplasia and provides for a second population of metaplastic progeny (including basal and reserve cells), the infection of which is paradoxically less likely to produce a biologically aggressive precursor. It also provides new targets in animal models to determine why the SC junction is uniquely susceptible to carcinogenic HPV infection. Copyright (c) 2012 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [less ▲]

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See detailA novel CACNA1A mutation results in episodic ataxia with migrainous features without headache
MAGIS, Delphine ULg; Boon, Elles; Coppola, Gianluca et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2012)

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See detailNovel causative mutations in patients with Nance-Horan syndrome and altered localization of the mutant NHS-A protein isoform
Shama, S.; Burdon, K. P.; Dave, A. et al

in Molecular Vision (2008), 14

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See detailNovel chiral 1-phosphono-1,3-butadiene for asymmetric hetero Diels-Alder cycloadditions with nitroso and azodicarboxylate dienophiles
Monbaliu, Jean-Christophe ULg; Tinant, Bernard; Peeters, Daniel et al

in Tetrahedron Letters (2010), 51

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (0 ULg)