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See detailPET In Conscious Rodents - Quantification of Stress During The Training Process
Warnock, Geoffrey ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Bretin, Florian ULg et al

Poster (2012, September)

Recently several methods for performing PET studies in conscious rodents have been developed [1-3]. These methods have the potential to greatly improve the translational nature of PET studies in rodents ... [more ▼]

Recently several methods for performing PET studies in conscious rodents have been developed [1-3]. These methods have the potential to greatly improve the translational nature of PET studies in rodents. One of the most easily implemented methods is the training of a rat to tolerate head fixation in a restraining device. Training consists of intervals of restraint over several days. However, the stress induced by this training procedure has not been quantified in detail. Limited changes in plasma corticosterone have been reported, but this data may be confounded by sample timing and baseline levels. An implantable telemetry system (Telemetry Research) was used to remotely measure blood pressure, heart rate and core temperature during training. Transmitters were implanted in the abdominal cavity under isoflurane anesthesia, with the blood pressure sensor fixed in the abdominal aorta. Training was started after a recovery period of at least 1 week. Training consisted of a 5 min period of acclimatization in the cage containing the restraining device, followed by increasing durations of restraint in the device on subsequent training days (15, 30, 45, 60, 90 min). Telemetry data was acquired from 5 min prior to acclimatization to 60 minutes post-training. In this initial pilot study, a single rat was trained, without head fixation, for 4 consecutive days and again on day 7. All reported values are mean ± SEM across the five training days. In the home cage, prior to acclimatization, baseline heart rate (HR) was 294 ± 15 bpm. During the acclimatization period, HR was elevated to 411 ± 7 bpm. Immediately after starting training, HR was 419 ± 16 bpm. During the training period HR showed a tendency to decrease, with raised periods at undefined intervals. After return to the home cage, HR remained elevated for 15-20 min before returning to a value (313 ± 9 bpm) close to baseline. A similar pattern was seen in blood pressure (mean; BP). Baseline BP was 76 ± 7 mmHg, increasing to 94 ± 9 mmHg during acclimatization. After commencing training, a peak in BP was reached at 102 ± 8 mmHg. After the 15-20 min recovery interval, BP returned to a baseline of 77 ± 9 mmHg. The HR and BP responses to acclimatization and to the training protocol persisted throughout all training days, with the main noticeable difference being the number of bouts of increased HR, which increased with training duration. Core body temperature (baseline: 37.45 ± 0.21 °C) increased during restraint training, with a subsequent post-training peak (38.21 ± 0.03 °C). Measurement of core temp is complicated during longer training sessions by the need to charge the transmitter. This early data indicates that stress induced by the training procedure for conscious PET persists after several days of training. In subsequent studies the head will be fixed and the effect of the training on plasma corticosterone and central glucose metabolism (using [18F]FDG) will be examined. [1] Momosaki et al. (2004) Synapse 54:207–213 [2] Wyss et al. (2009) NeuroImage 48:339–347 [3] Itoh et al. (2009) J Nucl Med 50:749–756 [less ▲]

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See detailPET in lung cancer
Rigo, Pierre ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Bury, Thierry ULg

in Bailey, D. L.; Townsend, D. W.; Valk, P. E. (Eds.) et al Positron emission tomography. Principles and practice (2004)

Positron Emission Tomography - basic science and clinical practice thoroughly explains the principles, clinical applications and economic aspects of PET today. Chapters go into detail on PET applications ... [more ▼]

Positron Emission Tomography - basic science and clinical practice thoroughly explains the principles, clinical applications and economic aspects of PET today. Chapters go into detail on PET applications in oncology, the central nervous system, cardio-respiratory systems, infectious diseases and pediatrics. Discussions are also found on technology design and evaluation, PET in drug discovery and development, and in imaging gene expression and therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailA PET investigation of lexicality and phonotactic frequency in oral language processing
Majerus, Steve ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

in Cognitive Neuropsychology (2002), 19(4), 343-360

Lexicality and phonotactic frequency effects are observed in many cognitive studies on language processing, but little is known about their underlying neural substrates, especially with regard to ... [more ▼]

Lexicality and phonotactic frequency effects are observed in many cognitive studies on language processing, but little is known about their underlying neural substrates, especially with regard to phonotactic frequency effects. Here, we conducted a positron emission tomography (PET) study in which 11 right-handed volunteers had either to repeat or to listen to lists of words, high phonotactic frequency nonwords, and low phonotactic frequency nonwords. The comparison of word versus nonword processing consistently confirmed previous findings of left temporal and prefrontal activations classically ascribed to lexicosemantic processing. Higher activation was found in the right posterior superior temporal gyrus when comparing high phonotactic frequency nonwords to words, but not when comparing low phonotactic frequency nonwords to words. We propose that this region is implicated in the formation of temporary phonological representations for high-probability phonological events, which may support processing of high phonotactic frequency nonwords [less ▲]

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See detailPet ownership in eight European birth cohorts - results of a GA(2)LEN initiative
Roll, S.; Keil, T.; Eller, E. et al

in Allergy (2007), 62

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See detailPET radiopharmaceuticals in Europe : Current use and data relevant for the formulation of summaries of product characteristics (SPCs)
Meyer, G. J.; Waters, S. L.; Coenen, H. H. et al

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine (1995), 22(12), 1420-1432

The increasing use of radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography (PET) has come to the attention of regulatory bodies. In order to help authorities in all aspects, the EANM has formed a task ... [more ▼]

The increasing use of radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography (PET) has come to the attention of regulatory bodies. In order to help authorities in all aspects, the EANM has formed a task group for licensing PET radiopharmaceuticals; this group has surveyed the use of these compounds in Europe by a questionnaire. The number of PET centres that responded to the questionnaire was 26, which included more than 90% of the larger European PET centres. The survey showed that 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose is by far the most important PET radiopharmaceutical with more than 200 applications per week, followed by [15O]water, [15O]carbonmonoxide, [13N]ammonia, [11C]-l-methionine, andl-6-[18F]fluoro-DOPA. More than 25 other PET radiopharmaceuticals are in regular use, however, at rather low application frequencies. The data were used by the European Pharmacopoeia Commission for its priority rating for requesting the formulation of monographs. Since it is likely that group registrations will be issued by authorities for the PET radiopharmaceuticals, relevant data on toxicity and dosimetry for the formulation of summaries of product characteristics have been collected by the task group as well. [less ▲]

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See detailPET scan imaging in oncology.
Jerusalem, Guy ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Beguin, Yves ULg et al

in European Journal of Cancer (2003), 39(11), 1525-34

With the emergence of positron emission tomography (PET) from research laboratories into routine clinical use, it is important to redefine the most appropriate use of each imaging technique. The aim of ... [more ▼]

With the emergence of positron emission tomography (PET) from research laboratories into routine clinical use, it is important to redefine the most appropriate use of each imaging technique. The aim of this review article is to show the potential of PET in oncology. We discuss the most promising indications and the perspectives for the future. We will also point out the shortcomings and the important questions to be answered before fully considering PET as a necessary tool in the day-to-day practice of oncology. Although many studies have documented the high accuracy of 18F-FDG PET for the detection and staging of malignant tumours and for the monitoring of therapy results in these patients, it is very important to assess the impact of the technique on patient outcome and to show cost-effectiveness from the societal viewpoint. [less ▲]

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See detailPET scanning and neuronal loss in acute vegetative state
Laureys, Steven ULg; Faymonville, Marie ULg; Moonen, Gustave ULg et al

in Lancet (2000), 355(9217), 1825-1826

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See detailPET-CT and PET-MRI in Oncology, A practical Guide: Gastrointestinal (135-159)
HUSTINX, Roland ULg

in PELLER, PATRICK; SUBRAMANIAM, RATHAN; GUERMAZI, ALI (Eds.) MEDICAL RADIOLOGY - DIAGNOSIS IMAGING : PET-CT and PET-MRI in Oncology - A pratical Guide (2012)

PET-CT combines in a single imaging session both anatomical and metabolic information. Depending on the strategy, the CT part of the study may yield only crude anatomical information and attenuation ... [more ▼]

PET-CT combines in a single imaging session both anatomical and metabolic information. Depending on the strategy, the CT part of the study may yield only crude anatomical information and attenuation correction for the PET part, or it may offer full radiological diagnostic features. Regarding the radiotracers for gastrointectinal oncology, FDG remains the mainstay but alternative compounds aimed at more specific biological targets are actively tested. In particular Ga-68-labelled DOTA derivatives image somatostatine receptors with exquisite sensitivity and specificity. In clinical practice, several indications are well recognized for FDG PET-CT. These include the initial staging of esophageal, pancreatic and rectal cancers with a clinical impact in a significal proportion of patients. The metabolic activity, as recorded prior to any treatment, holds prognostic information in esophageal and rectal cancers, as well as GISTs. Methodological issues remain to be solved, but the potential is clearly present so that an increased clinical role is highly likely in the near future. FDG PET-CT is a major clinical tool in the detection and staging of recurrent colorectal cancer, and for determining the resectability of liver metastases. Ongoing developments include technological advances, in particular the combined PET-MR devices, and alternative tracers, such as those imaging angiogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailPET/CT for assessing bone involvement in prostate and breast cancer.
WITHOFS, Nadia ULg; GRAYET, Benjamin ULg; TANCREDI, T. et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (2008), 49(SUPPL), 21

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See detailPET/CT imaging of skull base meningiomas using 1-18F-fluoro-L-tyrosine; initial report.
RUTTEN, I.; CABAY, Jean-Evrard ULg; WITHOFS, Nadia ULg et al

in PROCEEDINGS OF XIIIth SYMPOSIUM OF THE BELGIAN SOCIETY OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE (2007, May)

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See detailPET/CT imaging of skull base meningiomas using 2-18F-fluoro-L-tyrosine : Initial report.
RUTTEN, I.; CABAY, J.; WITHOFS, Nadia ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (2007), 48(SUPPL), 11

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See detailPET/CT in head and neck cancer: an update.
Hustinx, Roland ULg; Lucignani, Giovanni

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (2010), 37(3), 645-51

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See detailPET/CT of skull base meningiomas using 2-F-18-fluoro-L-tyrosine: Initial report
Rutten, Isabelle; Cabay, Jean-Evrard ULg; Withofs, Nadia ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (2007), 48(5), 720-725

Precise delineation of the shape of skull base meningiomas is critical for their treatment and follow-up but is often difficult using conventional imaging such as CT and MRI. We report our results with ... [more ▼]

Precise delineation of the shape of skull base meningiomas is critical for their treatment and follow-up but is often difficult using conventional imaging such as CT and MRI. We report our results with PET/CT and 2-(18)F-fluoro-L-tyrosine ((18)F-TYR), a marker of amino acid transport, as part of the yearly follow-up of irradiated patients. METHODS: Eleven patients (mean age, 56.5 y) with skull base meningiomas (n=13 lesions) previously irradiated were included. All patients received 300 MBq of (18)F-TYR and were imaged after 30 min of uptake, using a dedicated PET/CT system. The images were first visually examined, and regions of interest (ROI) were then placed over the transaxial PET slice showing the highest uptake. Another ROI was placed over the normal parietal cortex. Tumor-to-cortex activity ratios were obtained by dividing the maximum pixel value in the tumor ROI by the maximum pixel value in the cortex ROI. The PET/CT images were compared with the MR images obtained as part of routine follow-up. RESULTS: Accumulation of the tracer was higher in all meningiomas than in the surrounding tissue. The tumor-to-cortex activity ratio was 2.53 +/- 0.35 (range, 1.3-6). Nonneoplastic tissue such as hyperemic cavernous sinus did not take up the radionuclide and was therefore easily distinguished from the meningioma. The (18)F-TYR anomalies completely overlapped with the MR image in 54% of the tumors, extended beyond the MRI lesion in 38% of the tumors, and were smaller in 8% of the tumors. CONCLUSION: Meningiomas of the skull base are clearly visualized using (18)F-TYR PET/CT, even after irradiation. In addition to MRI, (18)F-TYR PET/CT images may contribute to the evaluation, delineation, and follow-up of these tumors. [less ▲]

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See detailPetae, petitiones, i gladiatori. Una nota su Serv. Verg. Aen. 9, 439 ed il PRyl. III 477
Scappaticcio, Maria Chiara ULg

in Materiali e Discussioni per l'Analisi dei Testi Classici (2013), 70

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See detailPeter Falck (ca 1468-1519) et ses livres : retour sur une passion
Adam, Renaud ULg

in Schweizerische Zeitschrift für Geschichte. Revue Suisse d’Histoire. Rivista Storica Svizzera (2006), 56

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See detailPeter Johnson, "Pretty Happy !
Delville, Michel ULg

in Literary Review (2001)

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See detailPeter Johnson, Love Poems for the Millenium
Delville, Michel ULg

in Literary Review (2001)

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See detailPeter Kuper: The Bridge
Meesters, Gert ULg

in Deus ex machina (2008), 32(125), 49

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See detailPeter Ladislaw Hammer (1936-2006)
Boros, Endre; Crama, Yves ULg; Simeone, Bruno

in 4OR : Quarterly Journal of the Belgian, French and Italian Operations Research Societies (2007), 5(1), 1-4

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (8 ULg)