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See detailLes pathologies osteo-articulaires : approche pluridisciplinaire
Bruyère, Olivier ULg

Scientific conference (2003, September 11)

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See detailPathologies sociales de la communication
Durand, Pascal ULg

in Questions de Communication (2009), 15

De la communication, souligner non les vertus, mais les vices ; examiner, au titre de ses pathologies - et plus spécialement de ses pathologies sociales -, non les biais dont elle peut faire l'objet, mais ... [more ▼]

De la communication, souligner non les vertus, mais les vices ; examiner, au titre de ses pathologies - et plus spécialement de ses pathologies sociales -, non les biais dont elle peut faire l'objet, mais ceux à la source desquels il arrive qu'elle se trouve ; l'envisager, non comme facteur de prévention ou de résorption de ces pathologies, mais plutôt comme leur éventuel vecteur d'aggravation circulaire, voilà comment pourrait être résumé à grands traits le propos du dossier ouvert dans la présente livraison de Questions de communication. Programme exorbitant : quelques articles réunis pour la cause ne sauraient épuiser ni même baliser avec précision une problématique pouvant aller, de façon très reçue, des phénomènes d'addiction électronique et des syndromes de déréalisation ou d'isolement induits par les technologies du virtuel aux dispositifs de propagande et autres techniques de lissage des différends politiques ou sociaux. Programme qui n'en paraîtra pas moins incongru au regard des conceptions enchantées de la communication et de la doxa qui l'institue non seulement en principe actif de la vie sociale en général, mais encore en ressource de première nécessité et en valeur indiscutable. [less ▲]

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See detailPathologies sociales de la communication
Durand, Pascal ULg

in Questions de Communication (2009), 15

La communication, dans sa généralité et dans la perspective des travaux récents de l'Ecole de Francfort, est généralement pensée comme solution à diverses pathologies sociales (isolement, malentendus ... [more ▼]

La communication, dans sa généralité et dans la perspective des travaux récents de l'Ecole de Francfort, est généralement pensée comme solution à diverses pathologies sociales (isolement, malentendus réciproques, aliénation, etc.). Le présent article l'envisage comme un vecteur de pathologies spécifiques : anomie, censure, propagande, production d'idéologèmes divers. [less ▲]

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See detailPathologies surrénaliennes
Peeters, Dominique ULg; Remy, Isabelle ULg

in Proceedings du congrès CNVSPA-SAVAB (2001, November)

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See detailpathologies uro-néphrologiques pédiatriques: 2° cycle
Battisti, Oreste ULg

Learning material (2008)

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See detailPathologies vésiculo-bulleuses cutanées
QUATRESOOZ, Pascale ULg

Scientific conference (2011)

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See detailPathology and outcome after HART
COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Bouzourene, H

in Strahlentherapie und Onkologie (2000)

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See detailPathology of human spinal cord trauma.
Martin, Didier ULg

Conference (1997, September 07)

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See detailPathology of influenza virus H5N1 infection in resistant and susceptible laboratory mice.
Garigliany, Mutien-Marie ULg; Cloquette, Karine; Leroy, Michaël et al

Conference (2008, September)

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See detailPathology of morbillivirus infections in marine mammals
Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Coignoul, Freddy ULg

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2001), 145(2), 76-

Morbillivirus infections were described since 1988 in marine mammals including pinnipeds and cetaceans. Since, numerous outbreaks, responsible for thousands marine mammals death, as well as sporadic cases ... [more ▼]

Morbillivirus infections were described since 1988 in marine mammals including pinnipeds and cetaceans. Since, numerous outbreaks, responsible for thousands marine mammals death, as well as sporadic cases, have occurred in various populations from North Atlantic, Mediterranean Sea, Baikal Lake, Caspian Sea, and recently from northern Pacific. Clinical signs and macroscopic lesions are similar between species infected by morbillivirus and are close to those reported in dog with canine distemper. Under microscope, characteristic les ions are interstitial bronchopneumonia, lymphoid depletion and subacute encephalitis. Syncytia and inclusion bodies are frequently observed in lesions and epithelia. Lymphoid depletion promotes secondary infections by opportunistic pathogens, responsible in many cases of the animals death. Various parameters explain the high sensibility of certain population such as the species, the naive immunological status and vectors intervention for the disease. [less ▲]

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See detailPathology of oiled seabirds along the Belgian coast during the 1992-1993 winter
Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Brosens, L.; Debacker, Virginie ULg et al

in meeting report (1996)

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See detailPathology of oiled seabirds at the Belgian coast
Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Brosens, L.; Coignoul, Freddy ULg

in meeting report (1994)

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See detailThe pathology of Psoroptes ovis infestation in cattle with a special emphasis on breed difference
Losson, Bertrand ULg; Lonneux, J. F.; Lekimme, Mireille ULg

in Veterinary Parasitology (1999), 83

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See detailPathophysiologic correlates in adult respiratory distress syndrome
Fallat, R. J.; Lamy, Maurice ULg

in Akutes progressives lungenversagen. Acute respiratory failure (1978)

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See detailPathophysiologic study of 3-methylindole-induced pulmonary toxicosis in immature cattle
Lekeux, Pierre ULg; Hajer, R.; van den Ingh, TSGAM et al

in American Journal of Veterinary Research (1985), 46(8), 1629-1631

In 5 Friesian calves given 3-methylindole (3-MI) (100 mg/kg once a week for 8 weeks, except calf 4, given a 50 mg/kg dose on weeks 3 to 8), pulmonary function (PF) values and arterial blood gas tensions ... [more ▼]

In 5 Friesian calves given 3-methylindole (3-MI) (100 mg/kg once a week for 8 weeks, except calf 4, given a 50 mg/kg dose on weeks 3 to 8), pulmonary function (PF) values and arterial blood gas tensions (PaO2 and PaCO2) were measured 24 hours after dosing was done and were correlated with clinical, biochemical, and pathologic changes. Three of the calves (No. 1, 2, and 3) showed acute respiratory distress syndrome 24 hours after the first 3-MI treatment, with a large increase in respiratory frequency, minute viscous work, and PaCO2 and a large decrease in tidal volume, dynamic lung compliance, and PaCO2. They died 36, 38, and 84 hours after dosing. Pulmonary function changes were compatible with the severe pulmonary edema and alveolar damage observed at necropsy. The 2 other calves, after they were given the 1st dose, showed only subacute respiratory distress syndrome with less severe changes in PF values recorded at 24 hours. Furthermore, they became progressively more tolerant to the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th weekly treatments, and showed base-line PF values after the 5th weekly treatment. Pathologic changes were not observed in lung biopsy material from these 2 animals at 2 and at 12 weeks after the 8th (or last) 3-MI treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailPathophysiological changes occurring during Escherichia coli endotoxin and Pasteurella multocida challenge in piglets: relationship with cough and temperature and predicitive value for intensity of lesions.
Halloy, David J; Bouhet, Sandrine; Oswald, Isabelle P et al

in Veterinary Research (2004), 35(3), 309-324

The aims of this study were (1) to correlate cough and body temperature (BT) with the severity of bronchopneumonia in pigs, (2) to determine whether these clinical signs can be used to early diagnose ... [more ▼]

The aims of this study were (1) to correlate cough and body temperature (BT) with the severity of bronchopneumonia in pigs, (2) to determine whether these clinical signs can be used to early diagnose bronchopneumonia and (3) to assess the predictive values of cough and BT regarding lung lesions. Bronchopneumonia was induced by administering E. coli endotoxin (LPS) combined with Pasteurella multocida type A (PmA) in the trachea of 13 piglets. Saline-instilled negative controls (n = 8), PmA inoculated (n = 6) and LPS instilled (n = 5) groups were also constituted. Cough and BT were recorded daily while the bronchopneumonia severity was assessed using bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cytology, cytokines and measurement of lung lesion volume. Changes in expiratory breathing pattern were also measured (Penh). The combination of LPS and PmA induced a subacute bronchopneumonia characterised by macrophage, neutrophil, and lymphocyte infiltration, changes in Penh and an increase in the mRNA level of IFN-gamma while IL8, IL-18 and TNF-alpha mRNA levels remained unchanged. The daily body weight gain of infected animals was significantly reduced. Cough and BT changes were proportional to the intensity of the lung inflammatory process, functional respiratory changes and to the extent of macroscopic lesions. When comparing the individual values of cough and BT to thresholds defined for both parameters, an early diagnosis of pneumonia was possible. Considering the pooled data of each group, it was possible to define thresholds allowing an early segregation between the groups of diseased and healthy piglets. The daily values of cough and BT were predictive for the volume of lung lesions recorded at the end of the trial. In conclusion, cough and BT appear as potential indicators for the intensity and the evolution of the respiratory disease. They also seem to be good predictors for the magnitude of lung lesions and weight gain recorded at the study endpoint. [less ▲]

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See detailPathophysiological mechanisms of dominant and recessive GLRA1 mutations in hyperekplexia.
Chung, Seo-Kyung; Vanbellinghen, Jean-François ULg; Mullins, Jonathan G L et al

in Journal of Neuroscience (2010), 30(28), 9612-20

Hyperekplexia is a rare, but potentially fatal, neuromotor disorder characterized by exaggerated startle reflexes and hypertonia in response to sudden, unexpected auditory or tactile stimuli. This ... [more ▼]

Hyperekplexia is a rare, but potentially fatal, neuromotor disorder characterized by exaggerated startle reflexes and hypertonia in response to sudden, unexpected auditory or tactile stimuli. This disorder is primarily caused by inherited mutations in the genes encoding the glycine receptor (GlyR) alpha1 subunit (GLRA1) and the presynaptic glycine transporter GlyT2 (SLC6A5). In this study, systematic DNA sequencing of GLRA1 in 88 new unrelated human hyperekplexia patients revealed 19 sequence variants in 30 index cases, of which 21 cases were inherited in recessive or compound heterozygote modes. This indicates that recessive hyperekplexia is far more prevalent than previous estimates. From the 19 GLRA1 sequence variants, we have investigated the functional effects of 11 novel and 2 recurrent mutations. The expression levels and functional properties of these hyperekplexia mutants were analyzed using a high-content imaging system and patch-clamp electrophysiology. When expressed in HEK293 cells, either as homomeric alpha1 or heteromeric alpha1beta GlyRs, subcellular localization defects were the major mechanism underlying recessive mutations. However, mutants without trafficking defects typically showed alterations in the glycine sensitivity suggestive of disrupted receptor function. This study also reports the first hyperekplexia mutation associated with a GlyR leak conductance, suggesting tonic channel opening as a new mechanism in neuronal ligand-gated ion channels. [less ▲]

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See detailPathophysiological response of bovine diaphragm function to gastric distension
Desmecht, Daniel ULg; Linden, Annick ULg; Lekeux, Pierre ULg

in Journal of Applied Physiology (1995), 78

Because of the anatomic association of an exceptionally bulky stomach with a striking compartmentation of the chest wall, leading to the most cranial insertion of the diaphragm among mammals, gastric ... [more ▼]

Because of the anatomic association of an exceptionally bulky stomach with a striking compartmentation of the chest wall, leading to the most cranial insertion of the diaphragm among mammals, gastric overdistension in the bovine species offers a unique pathophysiological condition for the diaphragm. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether increased intragastric pressure (Pga) (1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 kPa) leads to perturbations of respiratory and diaphragm function in calves. Changes in diaphragmatic strength and inspiratory action followed a biphasic pattern: 1) transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi) in response to constant bilateral maximal phrenic nerve stimulation at 30 Hz increased with moderate gastric distension and then fell abruptly as Pga continued to rise and 2) the magnitude of the ratio of the fall in pleural pressure to total Pdi was maintained up to a Pga amounting to 2 kPa but declined at higher pressures. We conclude that gastric distension in the bovine species provokes physiologically significant alterations of the diaphragm excitation-to-pressure generation coupling as well as of its capacity to convert Pdi into useful inspiratory pleural pressure. We suggest that these perturbations resulted from the combination of 1) altered tension-generating capacity due to compromised perfusion, 2) altered diaphragm geometry capable of altering tension-to-pressure generation coupling, and 3) modified coupling of the diaphragm with the chest wall that reduced its ability to drive inspiration [less ▲]

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See detailPathophysiological response of bovine pulmonary function to gastric distension
Desmecht, Daniel ULg; Linden, Annick ULg; Lekeux, Pierre ULg

in Journal of Comparative Pathology (1995), 112

The purpose was to determine whether gastric overdistension leads to lifethreatening perturbations of pulmonary gas exchange in healthy calves. Six animals were studied with normal (0 kPa) and increased ... [more ▼]

The purpose was to determine whether gastric overdistension leads to lifethreatening perturbations of pulmonary gas exchange in healthy calves. Six animals were studied with normal (0 kPa) and increased (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 kPa) intragastric pressure (IGP). Changes in pleural pressures and peak expiratory flow paralleled those of IGP. Inspiratory pressure-time index remained stable throughout the insufflation process. Pulmonary function values were characterized by abrupt changes with increasing IGP. Tidal volume declined as IGP increased and, along with inspiratory flow, decreased abruptly with the highest pressure (5 kPa). Respiratory rate progressively increased up to an IGP of 4 kPa, then decreased by 30%, due to breath-holding at the end of inspiration. Minute volume increased with IGP up to 4 kPa, but dramatically declined at 5 kPa. Total pulmonary resistance remained stable throughout the insufflation process, whereas lung dynamic compliance fell abruptly to one-half of its baseline value at IGPs of 1 kPa and above. Arterial oxygen tension was maintained at an IGP of 1 kPa, slightly diminished at 2–3 kPa, and markedly decreased at 4–5 kPa. Hypercapnia and respiratory acidosis developed progressively with increasing IGP. Changes in arterial gases were probably due to a combination of (1) alveolar hypoventilation, caused by altered tidal to dead space volume ratio, inadequate central nervous system “drive”, altered effectiveness of inspiratory muscle action, or end-inspiratory breath-holding, and (2) ventilation to perfusion mismatch, caused by perfusion of collapsed lung units. In the range of IGPs used, standardized arterial pH did not decline below the control value, which suggests that perfusion of peripheral tissues remained sufficient, and that respiratory failure rather than cardiovascular failure may be the principal physiopathological effect of increased gastric pressure [less ▲]

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