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See detailPET and PET/CT Imaging in Lung Cancer
Rigo, Pierre ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Bury, Thierry ULg

in Valk, PE; Delbeke, D; Bailey, DL (Eds.) et al Positron Emission Tomography - Clnical practice (2006)

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See detailPET and PET/CT imaging in lymphomas.
Jerusalem, Guy ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Rigo, Pierre ULg

in Valk, Peter E.; Delbeke, Dominique; Bailey, Dale L. (Eds.) et al Positron emission tomography (2006)

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See detailPET and PET/CT of lymphoma
Jerusalem, Guy ULg; Rigo, Pierre ULg; Israel, Ora

in von Schulthess, Gustav K (Ed.) Clinical Molecular Anatomic Imaging (2003)

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See detailPET for carcinomas of the genitourinary system
Belhocine, Tarik; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Devillers, Céline ULg et al

in Khakhali, I.; Laublant, J.; Goldsmith, S. J. (Eds.) NUCLEAR ONCOLOGY : DIAGNOSIS AND THERAPY (2000)

This book is intended to provide the state-of-the-art in the present knowledge of the fast growing field of nuclear oncology. The enormous sum of data it gathers is presented by the leading authors in ... [more ▼]

This book is intended to provide the state-of-the-art in the present knowledge of the fast growing field of nuclear oncology. The enormous sum of data it gathers is presented by the leading authors in their respective fields. Recent breakthrough as well as validated techniques are explained in details. Among the most stimulating issues, it becomes clear that the long awaited era of radioimmunotherapy is finally coming to reality and is close to enter into routine clinical use. Several chapters are devoted to this future important aspect of our practice. They should allow the reader to become quickly and completely informed about the main results of the recent trials and also to comprehend the expected evolutions in this field. Positron emission tomography (PET) also occupies a large place. Numerous illustrations help the reader to appreciate the wide capabilities of this technique. The more usual radiopharmaceuticals labeled by single photons emitters are not forgotten and all the aspects of the daily practice of nuclear oncology are covered, from thyroid and bone imaging to sentinel lymph node detection. The first part of the book covers transversally the field of nuclear oncology. A radiopharmaceuticals chapter provides an in-depth review of the properties and chemistry of the single-photon and positron emitters radionuclides. The various mechanisms of localization are also described at the membrane level as well as for metabolic substrates. The properties of the agents aiming at hormone receptors and tumor antigens are excellently described, as well as the recently introduced gene expression imaging. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is divided in two parts. The breast cancer chapter retraces the history and background of sestamibi in the detection of MDR. It also describes the methodology and clinical results of the most important scintigraphic studies that have demonstrated the possibility to detect the early development of resistance to chemotherapy. An interesting series of other agents with a high potential in this indication, particularly positron emitters, is discussed. The role of technetium and positron agents for MDR detection in other tumor localisations, especially in the lung, is also well covered. An instrumentation chapter goes through the fundamentals of planar and SPECT imaging, and also presents the new reconstruction and correction algorithms. A large section is occupied by positron imaging. The pros and cons of dedicated detector and camera coincidence are very well detailed. This part should definitely help to decide those who are trying to make a choice between these two options. The general principles of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies imaging and therapy are covered in two very interesting chapters. Then radiotherapy of painful bone metastases compares the capabilities of the various agents available. A large chapter deals with pediatric nuclear oncology, in particular neuroblastoma, bone and central nervous system tumors. Finally, the often forgotten role of nuclear medicine in the detection, and possibly in the prevention, of the cardiotoxicity and nephrotoxicity resulting from cancer therapy are addressed at the end of that first part. The second part of the book goes by organ and begins by addressing brain tumors. A vast chapter is devoted to PET imaging. Besides the tracers and instrumentation issues, patient management occupies a central place, in particular with discussion on the role of nuclear medicine in tissue characterization, treatment planning and assessment of treatment response. Cerebrospinal fluid and shunt imaging are described, with particular attention paid to ventriculoperitoneal shunts. After PET imaging of head and neck carcinoma, a chapter extensively reviews thyroid carcinoma. Iodine therapy and long-term monitoring are covered with great details and useful practical recommendations are provided. Emerging radioimmunotherapy is discussed apart. Parathyroid scintigraphy also occupies a large and well documented chapter. PET imaging of lung carcinoma is particularly well illustrated by several cases. The potential of peptide scintigraphy is presented. Breast cancer occupies five chapters, namely, scintimammography, PET imaging, lymphatic mapping, monoclonal antibody imaging and radionuclide therapy. This provides an extensive review of the present and potential possibilities of nuclear medicine in one of the most frequent tumors. Then the role of PET imaging and the capabilities of radioimmunotherapy for maligancies of the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts are presented, in particular in two chapters entirely dedicated to prostate carcinoma and in two others to ovarian carcinoma. Radiolabeled somatostatin analogues and their value in the diagnosis and treatment of the neuroendocrine tumors are reviewed. Hepatic neoplasia are addressed through the utilization of technetium-labeled galactosyl neoglycoalbumin and hepatic artery infusion. For lymphomas, besides gallium and PET imaging, a very complete chapter is devoted to monoclonal antibody therapy. The extremely promising results obtained with several radiolabeled-anti-CD monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas are reviewed in depth. Additional chapters cover adrenal tumors, melanoma, musculoskeletal tumors, in particular imaging of bone metastases. This comprehensive, didactic, up-to-date, well illustrated review of nuclear oncology should help nuclear medicine physicians as well as oncologists to optimize their practice. This book is intended to provide the state-of-the-art in the present knowledge of the fast growing field of nuclear oncology. The enormous sum of data it gathers is presented by the leading authors in their respective fields. Recent breakthrough as well as validated techniques are explained in details. Among the most stimulating issues, it becomes clear that the long awaited era of radioimmunotherapy is finally coming to reality and is close to enter into routine clinical use. Several chapters are devoted to this future important aspect of our practice. They should allow the reader to become quickly and completely informed about the main results of the recent trials and also to comprehend the expected evolutions in this field. Positron emission tomography (PET) also occupies a large place. Numerous illustrations help the reader to appreciate the wide capabilities of this technique. The more usual radiopharmaceuticals labeled by single photons emitters are not forgotten and all the aspects of the daily practice of nuclear oncology are covered, from thyroid and bone imaging to sentinel lymph node detection. The first part of the book covers transversally the field of nuclear oncology. A radiopharmaceuticals chapter provides an in-depth review of the properties and chemistry of the single-photon and positron emitters radionuclides. The various mechanisms of localization are also described at the membrane level as well as for metabolic substrates. The properties of the agents aiming at hormone receptors and tumor antigens are excellently described, as well as the recently introduced gene expression imaging. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is divided in two parts. The breast cancer chapter retraces the history and background of sestamibi in the detection of MDR. It also describes the methodology and clinical results of the most important scintigraphic studies that have demonstrated the possibility to detect the early development of resistance to chemotherapy. An interesting series of other agents with a high potential in this indication, particularly positron emitters, is discussed. The role of technetium and positron agents for MDR detection in other tumor localisations, especially in the lung, is also well covered. An instrumentation chapter goes through the fundamentals of planar and SPECT imaging, and also presents the new reconstruction and correction algorithms. A large section is occupied by positron imaging. The pros and cons of dedicated detector and camera coincidence are very well detailed. This part should definitely help to decide those who are trying to make a choice between these two options. The general principles of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies imaging and therapy are covered in two very interesting chapters. Then radiotherapy of painful bone metastases compares the capabilities of the various agents available. A large chapter deals with pediatric nuclear oncology, in particular neuroblastoma, bone and central nervous system tumors. Finally, the often forgotten role of nuclear medicine in the detection, and possibly in the prevention, of the cardiotoxicity and nephrotoxicity resulting from cancer therapy are addressed at the end of that first part. The second part of the book goes by organ and begins by addressing brain tumors. A vast chapter is devoted to PET imaging. Besides the tracers and instrumentation issues, patient management occupies a central place, in particular with discussion on the role of nuclear medicine in tissue characterization, treatment planning and assessment of treatment response. Cerebrospinal fluid and shunt imaging are described, with particular attention paid to ventriculoperitoneal shunts. After PET imaging of head and neck carcinoma, a chapter extensively reviews thyroid carcinoma. Iodine therapy and long-term monitoring are covered with great details and useful practical recommendations are provided. Emerging radioimmunotherapy is discussed apart. Parathyroid scintigraphy also occupies a large and well documented chapter. PET imaging of lung carcinoma is particularly well illustrated by several cases. The potential of peptide scintigraphy is presented. Breast cancer occupies five chapters, namely, scintimammography, PET imaging, lymphatic mapping, monoclonal antibody imaging and radionuclide therapy. This provides an extensive review of the present and potential possibilities of nuclear medicine in one of the most frequent tumors. Then the role of PET imaging and the capabilities of radioimmunotherapy for maligancies of the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts are presented, in particular in two chapters entirely dedicated to prostate carcinoma and in two others to ovarian carcinoma. Radiolabeled somatostatin analogues and their value in the diagnosis and treatment of the neuroendocrine tumors are reviewed. Hepatic neoplasia are addressed through the utilization of technetium-labeled galactosyl neoglycoalbumin and hepatic artery infusion. For lymphomas, besides gallium and PET imaging, a very complete chapter is devoted to monoclonal antibody therapy. The extremely promising results obtained with several radiolabeled-anti-CD monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas are reviewed in depth. Additional chapters cover adrenal tumors, melanoma, musculoskeletal tumors, in particular imaging of bone metastases. This comprehensive, didactic, up-to-date, well illustrated review of nuclear oncology should help nuclear medicine physicians as well as oncologists to optimize their practice. [less ▲]

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See detailPET imaging analysis using a parcelation approach and multiple kernel classification
Segovia-Román, Fermín ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg

in International Workshop on Pattern Recognition in Neuroimaging, Tübingen 4-6 June 2014 (in press)

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a non-invasive medical imaging modality that provides information about physiological processes. Due to its ability to measure the brain metabolism, it is widely used ... [more ▼]

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a non-invasive medical imaging modality that provides information about physiological processes. Due to its ability to measure the brain metabolism, it is widely used to assist the diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) of Parkinsonism. In order to avoid the subjectivity inherent to the visual exploration of the images, several computer systems to analyze PET data were developed during the last years. However, dealing with the huge amount of information provided by PET imaging is still a challenge. In this work we present a novel methodology to analyze PET data that improves the automatic differentiation between controls and AD patients. First the images are divided into small regions or parcels, defined either anatomically, geometrically or randomly. Secondly, the accuray of each single region is estimated using a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier and a cross-validation approach. Finally, all the regions are assessed together using multiple kernel SVM with a kernel per region. The classifier is built so that the most discriminative regions have more weight in the final decision. This method was evaluated using a PET dataset that contained images from healthy controls and AD patients. The classification results obtained with the proposed approach outperformed two recently reported computer systems based on Principal Component Analysis and Independent Component Analysis. [less ▲]

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See detailPET imaging for differentiating recurrent brain tumor from radiation necrosis
Hustinx, Roland ULg; Pourdehnad, M.; Kaschten, Bruno ULg et al

in Radiologic Clinics of North America (2005), 43(1), 35-47

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See detailPET imaging in assessing gastrointestinal tumors
Hustinx, Roland ULg

in Radiologic Clinics of North America (2004), 42(6), 1123

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See detailPET imaging in lung cancer
Rigo, Pierre ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Bury, Thierry ULg

in Valk, Peter E.; Delbeke, Dominique; Bailey, Dale L. (Eds.) et al Positron emission tomography (2006)

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See detailPET Imaging in Lymphoma
Jerusalem, Guy ULg; Rigo, Pierre ULg

in Valk, P. E.; Bailey, D. L.; Townsend, D. W. (Eds.) et al Positron emission tomography (2003)

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See detailPET imaging of arthritis
Hustinx, Roland ULg; Malaise, Michel ULg

in PET Clinics (2006), 1

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See detailPET imaging of liver metastases: a retrospective study.
HUSTINX, Roland ULg; PAULUS, P.; DAENEN, Frédéric ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (1996, May), 37

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See detailPET imaging of tumor neovascularization in a transgenic mouse model with a novel 64Cu-DOTA-knottin peptide.
Nielsen, Carsten H; Kimura, Richard H; WITHOFS, Nadia ULg et al

in Cancer Research (2010), 70(22), 9022-30

Due to the high mortality of lung cancer, there is a critical need to develop diagnostic procedures enabling early detection of the disease while at a curable stage. Targeted molecular imaging builds on ... [more ▼]

Due to the high mortality of lung cancer, there is a critical need to develop diagnostic procedures enabling early detection of the disease while at a curable stage. Targeted molecular imaging builds on the positive attributes of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) to allow for a noninvasive detection and characterization of smaller lung nodules, thus increasing the chances of positive treatment outcome. In this study, we investigate the ability to characterize lung tumors that spontaneously arise in a transgenic mouse model. The tumors are first identified with small animal CT followed by characterization with the use of small animal PET with a novel 64Cu-1,4,7,10-tetra-azacylododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-knottin peptide that targets integrins upregulated during angiogenesis on the tumor associated neovasculature. The imaging results obtained with the knottin peptide are compared with standard 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET small animal imaging. Lung nodules as small as 3 mm in diameter were successfully identified in the transgenic mice by small animal CT, and both 64Cu-DOTA-knottin 2.5F and FDG were able to differentiate lung nodules from the surrounding tissues. Uptake and retention of the 64Cu-DOTA-knottin 2.5F tracer in the lung tumors combined with a low background in the thorax resulted in a statistically higher tumor to background (normal lung) ratio compared with FDG (6.01+/-0.61 versus 4.36+/-0.68; P<0.05). Ex vivo biodistribution showed 64Cu-DOTA-knottin 2.5F to have a fast renal clearance combined with low nonspecific accumulation in the thorax. Collectively, these results show 64Cu-DOTA-knottin 2.5F to be a promising candidate for clinical translation for earlier detection and improved characterization of lung cancer. [less ▲]

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See detailPET In Conscious Rodents - Quantification of Stress During The Training Process
Warnock, Geoffrey ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Bretin, Florian ULg et al

Poster (2012, September)

Recently several methods for performing PET studies in conscious rodents have been developed [1-3]. These methods have the potential to greatly improve the translational nature of PET studies in rodents ... [more ▼]

Recently several methods for performing PET studies in conscious rodents have been developed [1-3]. These methods have the potential to greatly improve the translational nature of PET studies in rodents. One of the most easily implemented methods is the training of a rat to tolerate head fixation in a restraining device. Training consists of intervals of restraint over several days. However, the stress induced by this training procedure has not been quantified in detail. Limited changes in plasma corticosterone have been reported, but this data may be confounded by sample timing and baseline levels. An implantable telemetry system (Telemetry Research) was used to remotely measure blood pressure, heart rate and core temperature during training. Transmitters were implanted in the abdominal cavity under isoflurane anesthesia, with the blood pressure sensor fixed in the abdominal aorta. Training was started after a recovery period of at least 1 week. Training consisted of a 5 min period of acclimatization in the cage containing the restraining device, followed by increasing durations of restraint in the device on subsequent training days (15, 30, 45, 60, 90 min). Telemetry data was acquired from 5 min prior to acclimatization to 60 minutes post-training. In this initial pilot study, a single rat was trained, without head fixation, for 4 consecutive days and again on day 7. All reported values are mean ± SEM across the five training days. In the home cage, prior to acclimatization, baseline heart rate (HR) was 294 ± 15 bpm. During the acclimatization period, HR was elevated to 411 ± 7 bpm. Immediately after starting training, HR was 419 ± 16 bpm. During the training period HR showed a tendency to decrease, with raised periods at undefined intervals. After return to the home cage, HR remained elevated for 15-20 min before returning to a value (313 ± 9 bpm) close to baseline. A similar pattern was seen in blood pressure (mean; BP). Baseline BP was 76 ± 7 mmHg, increasing to 94 ± 9 mmHg during acclimatization. After commencing training, a peak in BP was reached at 102 ± 8 mmHg. After the 15-20 min recovery interval, BP returned to a baseline of 77 ± 9 mmHg. The HR and BP responses to acclimatization and to the training protocol persisted throughout all training days, with the main noticeable difference being the number of bouts of increased HR, which increased with training duration. Core body temperature (baseline: 37.45 ± 0.21 °C) increased during restraint training, with a subsequent post-training peak (38.21 ± 0.03 °C). Measurement of core temp is complicated during longer training sessions by the need to charge the transmitter. This early data indicates that stress induced by the training procedure for conscious PET persists after several days of training. In subsequent studies the head will be fixed and the effect of the training on plasma corticosterone and central glucose metabolism (using [18F]FDG) will be examined. [1] Momosaki et al. (2004) Synapse 54:207–213 [2] Wyss et al. (2009) NeuroImage 48:339–347 [3] Itoh et al. (2009) J Nucl Med 50:749–756 [less ▲]

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See detailPET in lung cancer
Rigo, Pierre ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Bury, Thierry ULg

in Bailey, D. L.; Townsend, D. W.; Valk, P. E. (Eds.) et al Positron emission tomography. Principles and practice (2004)

Positron Emission Tomography - basic science and clinical practice thoroughly explains the principles, clinical applications and economic aspects of PET today. Chapters go into detail on PET applications ... [more ▼]

Positron Emission Tomography - basic science and clinical practice thoroughly explains the principles, clinical applications and economic aspects of PET today. Chapters go into detail on PET applications in oncology, the central nervous system, cardio-respiratory systems, infectious diseases and pediatrics. Discussions are also found on technology design and evaluation, PET in drug discovery and development, and in imaging gene expression and therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailA PET investigation of lexicality and phonotactic frequency in oral language processing
Majerus, Steve ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

in Cognitive Neuropsychology (2002), 19(4), 343-360

Lexicality and phonotactic frequency effects are observed in many cognitive studies on language processing, but little is known about their underlying neural substrates, especially with regard to ... [more ▼]

Lexicality and phonotactic frequency effects are observed in many cognitive studies on language processing, but little is known about their underlying neural substrates, especially with regard to phonotactic frequency effects. Here, we conducted a positron emission tomography (PET) study in which 11 right-handed volunteers had either to repeat or to listen to lists of words, high phonotactic frequency nonwords, and low phonotactic frequency nonwords. The comparison of word versus nonword processing consistently confirmed previous findings of left temporal and prefrontal activations classically ascribed to lexicosemantic processing. Higher activation was found in the right posterior superior temporal gyrus when comparing high phonotactic frequency nonwords to words, but not when comparing low phonotactic frequency nonwords to words. We propose that this region is implicated in the formation of temporary phonological representations for high-probability phonological events, which may support processing of high phonotactic frequency nonwords [less ▲]

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See detailPet ownership in eight European birth cohorts - results of a GA(2)LEN initiative
Roll, S.; Keil, T.; Eller, E. et al

in Allergy (2007), 62

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See detailPET radiopharmaceuticals in Europe : Current use and data relevant for the formulation of summaries of product characteristics (SPCs)
Meyer, G. J.; Waters, S. L.; Coenen, H. H. et al

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine (1995), 22(12), 1420-1432

The increasing use of radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography (PET) has come to the attention of regulatory bodies. In order to help authorities in all aspects, the EANM has formed a task ... [more ▼]

The increasing use of radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography (PET) has come to the attention of regulatory bodies. In order to help authorities in all aspects, the EANM has formed a task group for licensing PET radiopharmaceuticals; this group has surveyed the use of these compounds in Europe by a questionnaire. The number of PET centres that responded to the questionnaire was 26, which included more than 90% of the larger European PET centres. The survey showed that 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose is by far the most important PET radiopharmaceutical with more than 200 applications per week, followed by [15O]water, [15O]carbonmonoxide, [13N]ammonia, [11C]-l-methionine, andl-6-[18F]fluoro-DOPA. More than 25 other PET radiopharmaceuticals are in regular use, however, at rather low application frequencies. The data were used by the European Pharmacopoeia Commission for its priority rating for requesting the formulation of monographs. Since it is likely that group registrations will be issued by authorities for the PET radiopharmaceuticals, relevant data on toxicity and dosimetry for the formulation of summaries of product characteristics have been collected by the task group as well. [less ▲]

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See detailPET scan imaging in oncology.
Jerusalem, Guy ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Beguin, Yves ULg et al

in European Journal of Cancer (2003), 39(11), 1525-34

With the emergence of positron emission tomography (PET) from research laboratories into routine clinical use, it is important to redefine the most appropriate use of each imaging technique. The aim of ... [more ▼]

With the emergence of positron emission tomography (PET) from research laboratories into routine clinical use, it is important to redefine the most appropriate use of each imaging technique. The aim of this review article is to show the potential of PET in oncology. We discuss the most promising indications and the perspectives for the future. We will also point out the shortcomings and the important questions to be answered before fully considering PET as a necessary tool in the day-to-day practice of oncology. Although many studies have documented the high accuracy of 18F-FDG PET for the detection and staging of malignant tumours and for the monitoring of therapy results in these patients, it is very important to assess the impact of the technique on patient outcome and to show cost-effectiveness from the societal viewpoint. [less ▲]

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See detailPET scanning and neuronal loss in acute vegetative state
Laureys, Steven ULg; Faymonville, Marie ULg; Moonen, Gustave ULg et al

in Lancet (2000), 355(9217), 1825-1826

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See detailPET-CT and PET-MRI in Oncology, A practical Guide: Gastrointestinal (135-159)
HUSTINX, Roland ULg

in PELLER, PATRICK; SUBRAMANIAM, RATHAN; GUERMAZI, ALI (Eds.) MEDICAL RADIOLOGY - DIAGNOSIS IMAGING : PET-CT and PET-MRI in Oncology - A pratical Guide (2012)

PET-CT combines in a single imaging session both anatomical and metabolic information. Depending on the strategy, the CT part of the study may yield only crude anatomical information and attenuation ... [more ▼]

PET-CT combines in a single imaging session both anatomical and metabolic information. Depending on the strategy, the CT part of the study may yield only crude anatomical information and attenuation correction for the PET part, or it may offer full radiological diagnostic features. Regarding the radiotracers for gastrointectinal oncology, FDG remains the mainstay but alternative compounds aimed at more specific biological targets are actively tested. In particular Ga-68-labelled DOTA derivatives image somatostatine receptors with exquisite sensitivity and specificity. In clinical practice, several indications are well recognized for FDG PET-CT. These include the initial staging of esophageal, pancreatic and rectal cancers with a clinical impact in a significal proportion of patients. The metabolic activity, as recorded prior to any treatment, holds prognostic information in esophageal and rectal cancers, as well as GISTs. Methodological issues remain to be solved, but the potential is clearly present so that an increased clinical role is highly likely in the near future. FDG PET-CT is a major clinical tool in the detection and staging of recurrent colorectal cancer, and for determining the resectability of liver metastases. Ongoing developments include technological advances, in particular the combined PET-MR devices, and alternative tracers, such as those imaging angiogenesis. [less ▲]

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