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See detailNeue Regierung zwingend erforderlich (interview de presse)
Behrendt, Christian ULg

Article for general public (2011)

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See detailEine neue statische Dampfdruckapparatur, deren Gleichgewichtszelle ein variables Volumen besitzt
Gaube, J; Hammer, S; Pfennig, Andreas ULg

Conference (1995)

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See detailEin neuer Blick auf Uwe Johnsons "Jahrestage"
Letawe, Céline ULg

in Johnson-Jahrbuch (2005), 11

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See detailEin neues Modell zur Auslegung von Faserbett-Koaleszenzabscheidern
Speth, H; Pfennig, Andreas ULg; Chatterjee, M et al

Conference (2002)

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See detailDie neuinwertsetzung von betriebsbrachen in traditionellen industrieregionen. Ein Vergleich zwischen Lüttich und Sheffield
Guilliams, P.; Halleux, Jean-Marie ULg

in Matznetter, W.; Musil, R. (Eds.) Europa: metropolen in wandel (2011)

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See detailNeun Bände in fünf Jahren
Pontzen, Alexandra ULg

in Literaturkritik.de (2010)

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See detailNeural Activation During Mental Rotation in Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome: the Influence of Sex Hormones and Sex Chromosomes.
van Hemmen, Judy; Veltman, Dick J.; Hoekzema, Elseline et al

in Cerebral Cortex (2014)

Sex hormones, androgens in particular, are hypothesized to play a key role in the sexual differentiation of the human brain. However, possible direct effects of the sex chromosomes, that is, XX or XY ... [more ▼]

Sex hormones, androgens in particular, are hypothesized to play a key role in the sexual differentiation of the human brain. However, possible direct effects of the sex chromosomes, that is, XX or XY, have not been well studied in humans. Individuals with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), who have a 46,XY karyotype but a female phenotype due to a complete androgen resistance, enable us to study the separate effects of gonadal hormones versus sex chromosomes on neural sex differences. Therefore, in the present study, we compared 46,XY men (n = 30) and 46,XX women (n = 29) to 46,XY individuals with CAIS (n = 21) on a mental rotation task using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Previously reported sex differences in neural activation during mental rotation were replicated in the control groups, with control men showing more activation in the inferior parietal lobe than control women. Individuals with CAIS showed a female-like neural activation pattern in the parietal lobe, indicating feminization of the brain in CAIS. Furthermore, this first neuroimaging study in individuals with CAIS provides evidence that sex differences in regional brain function during mental rotation are most likely not directly driven by genetic sex, but rather reflect gonadal hormone exposure. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural and cognitive bases of upper limb apraxia in corticobasal degeneration
Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg; Garraux, Gaëtan ULg et al

in Neurology (2001), 57(7), 1259-1268

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the neural and cognitive bases of upper limb apraxia in corticobasal degeneration (CBD). METHODS: Eighteen patients with CBD underwent a cognitive neuropsychological assessment ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the neural and cognitive bases of upper limb apraxia in corticobasal degeneration (CBD). METHODS: Eighteen patients with CBD underwent a cognitive neuropsychological assessment of apraxia and resting [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET scanning. Two complementary measures of apraxia were computed for each modality of gesture production. First, a performance score measured error frequency during gesture execution. Second, as a more stringent test of the integrity of the praxis system, the correction score measured the patient's ability to correct his or her errors on a second attempt. For each measure type, a cut-off score for the presence of apraxia was defined with regard to healthy controls. Using each cut-off score, the regional cerebral glucose metabolism of patients with CBD with apraxia (i.e., performing below cut-off score) was compared with that of patients with CBD without apraxia. RESULTS: Mean performance scores were below normal values in all modalities. Anterior cingulate hypometabolism predominated in patients with CBD who performed below the cut-off performance score. At variance, mean correction scores were below normal values for gesture imitation only. Hypometabolism in superior parietal lobule and supplementary motor area characterized patients with CBD who were unable to correct their errors at the same rate as control subjects did. CONCLUSIONS: Distinct neural networks underlie distinct aspects of the upper limb apraxic deficits in CBD. Extending previous findings of gesture production deficits in CBD, the use of complementary measures of apraxic behavior discloses a visuoimitative upper limb apraxia in CBD, underlain by a metabolic decrease in a parietofrontal neural network. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural bases of deficits of episodic memory in Alzheimer’s disease
Bastin, Christine ULg

Scientific conference (2012)

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See detailThe neural bases of proactive and reactive control processes in healthy aging
Manard, Marine ULg; François, Sarah ULg; SALMON, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2015, May 28)

Background. Research on cognitive control suggests an age-related decline in proactive control abilities (an anticipatory form of control) whereas reactive control (consecutive to conflict detection ... [more ▼]

Background. Research on cognitive control suggests an age-related decline in proactive control abilities (an anticipatory form of control) whereas reactive control (consecutive to conflict detection) seems to remain intact [1]. As proactive and reactive control abilities were associated to specific brain networks [2], this study investigated age-related effects on the neural substrates associated to each kind of control. Method. A modified form of the Stroop task was administered to 16 young and 16 older adults in an event-related fMRI experiment. In this version of the Stroop task, three different contexts were created: (1) a mostly congruent context (MC, inducing reactive control) with a majority of congruent items, (2) a mostly incongruent context (MI, inducing proactive control) with mainly interfering items, (3) a neutral context (MN) with mainly neutral items. Preprocessing and statistical analyses were performed with SPM8 (p<.001 uncorrected). Results. Behavioral results (p<0.05) indicated faster processing of interferent items in the MI than MC context in young participants only. With regard to neuroimaging data, the comparison of the two groups showed that the processing of interferent items in the MI context is associated to decreased activity in (mainly right-sided) frontal and temporal areas in the older group. On the contrary, in the MC context, increased activity was observed in bilateral frontal areas for older compared to younger participants. Discussion. Behavioral results confirm that older participants have difficulties with the implementation of proactive control that is associated to decreased brain activity (compared to young participants) in areas underlying Stroop performance. However, the recruitment of supplementary frontal areas we observed in the reactive control condition suggests compensation processes. So, aging seems to differentially affect the neural networks associated to the various kinds of cognitive control. [less ▲]

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See detailThe neural bases of proactive and reactive control processes in normal aging
Manard, Marine ULg; François, Sarah ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2014)

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See detailThe neural basis of personal goal processing when envisioning future events
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Stawarczyk, David ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2010), 22

Abstract Episodic future thinking allows humans to mentally simulate virtually infinite future possibilities, yet this device is fundamentally goal-directed and should not be equated with fantasizing or ... [more ▼]

Abstract Episodic future thinking allows humans to mentally simulate virtually infinite future possibilities, yet this device is fundamentally goal-directed and should not be equated with fantasizing or wishful thinking. The purpose of this functional magnetic resonance imaging study was to investigate the neural basis of such goal-directed processing during future-event simulation. Participants were scanned while they imagined future events that were related to their personal goals (personal future events) and future events that were plausible but unrelated to their personal goals (nonpersonal future events). Results showed that imaging personal future events elicited stronger activation in ventral medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) compared to imaging nonpersonal future events. Moreover, these brain activations overlapped with activations elicited by a second task that assessed semantic self-knowledge (i.e., making judgments on one's own personality traits), suggesting that ventral MPFC and PCC mediate self-referential processing across different functional domains. It is suggested that these brain regions may support a collection of processes that evaluate, code, and contextualize the relevance of mental representations with regard to personal goals. The implications of these findings for the understanding of the function instantiated by the default network of the brain are also discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailThe neural basis of semantic and episodic forms of self-knowledge: insights from functional neuroimaging
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg

in Lopez-Larrea, Carlos (Ed.) Sensing in nature (2012)

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See detailThe neural basis of short-term memory and attention : neuropsychology and fMRI
Majerus, Steve ULg

Conference (2009, December 04)

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See detailThe neural basis of temporal order processing in past and future thought
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Jeunehomme, Olivier ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2015), 27

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See detailThe neural correlate of (un)awareness: lessons from the vegetative state
Laureys, Steven ULg

in Trends in Cognitive Sciences (2005), 9(12), 556-559

Consciousness has two main components: wakefulness and awareness. The vegetative state is characterized by wakefulness without awareness. Recent functional neuroimaging results have shown that some parts ... [more ▼]

Consciousness has two main components: wakefulness and awareness. The vegetative state is characterized by wakefulness without awareness. Recent functional neuroimaging results have shown that some parts of the cortex are still functioning in 'vegetative' patients. External stimulation, such as a painful stimulus, still activates 'primary' sensory cortices in these patients but these areas are functionally disconnected from 'higher order' associative areas needed for awareness. Such studies are disentangling the neural correlates of the vegetative state from the minimally conscious state, and have major clinical consequences in addition to empirical importance for the understanding of consciousness. [less ▲]

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See detailThe neural correlate of consciousness: lessons from coma related states
Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg

Scientific conference (2010)

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