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See detailOSMOTIC DEHYDRATION OF POMEGRANATE SEEDS (PUNICA GRANATUM L.): EFFECT OF FREEZING PRE-TREATMENT
Bchir, Brahim ULg; Souhail, Besbes; Attia, Hamadi et al

in Journal of Food Process Engineering (2010)

The osmotic dehydration of pomegranate seeds was compared using fresh and frozen seeds. The process was carried out at 50C in a 55°Brix solution of sucrose. Freezing pomegranate seeds before osmotic ... [more ▼]

The osmotic dehydration of pomegranate seeds was compared using fresh and frozen seeds. The process was carried out at 50C in a 55°Brix solution of sucrose. Freezing pomegranate seeds before osmotic dehydration involved an increase of effective diffusivity and a reduction in dehydration time. The most significant changes of water loss (WL) (46 g/100 g of fresh seeds [FS]) and solids gain (SG) (7 g/100 g of FS) took place during the first 20 min for frozen seeds. After this period, seeds WL and SG ranged on average close to 43 and 8 g/100 g of FS, respectively. Osmotic dehydration was slower starting from fresh fruits but led to a higher rate of WL (62 g/100 g of FS) at the end of the process. Both scanning electron microscopy and texture analysis showed a destruction of cell structure and seed texture during the pretreatment (freezing). The same techniques also revealed a texture/structure modification induced by the osmotic dehydration process [less ▲]

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See detailOsmotic dehydration of pomegranate seeds: mass transfer kinetics and differential scanning calorimetry characterization
Bchir, Brahim ULg; Souhail, Besbes; Attia, Hamadi et al

in International Journal of Food Science & Technology (2009), 44

Osmotic dehydration of pomegranate seeds was carried out at different temperatures (30, 40, 50 C) in a 55 Brix solution of sucrose, glucose, and mixture sucrose & glucose (50:50, w⁄ w). The most ... [more ▼]

Osmotic dehydration of pomegranate seeds was carried out at different temperatures (30, 40, 50 C) in a 55 Brix solution of sucrose, glucose, and mixture sucrose & glucose (50:50, w⁄ w). The most significant changes of water loss and solids gain took place during the first 20 min of dewatering. During this period, seeds water loss was estimated to 46% in sucrose, 37% in glucose and 41% in mix glucose ⁄ sucrose solution. The increase of temperature favoured the increase of water loss, weight reduction, solids gain and effective diffusivity. Differential scanning calorimetry data provided complementary information on the mobility changes of water and solute in osmodehydrated pomegranate seeds. The ratio between % frozen water and % unfreezable water decreased from 5 to 0.5 during the process. That involving the presence of very tightly bound water to the sample, which is very difficult to eliminate with this process. It also appeared that glass transition temperature depends on the types of sugar [less ▲]

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See detailOsmotic environment of Phaseolus polyanthus Greenm. and P. vulgaris L. embryos during early development
Geerts, P.; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre ULg; Mergeai, Guy ULg

in Bean Improvement Cooperative (1999), (42), 83-84

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See detailOsmotic pretreatment promotes axillary shooting from cauliflower curd pieces by acting through internal cytokinin level modifications
Vandemoortele, Jean-Luc; Kevers, Claire ULg; Billard, Jean-Pierre et al

in Journal of Plant Physiology (2001), 158(2), 221-225

In vitro propagation of cauliflower has generally been achieved through axillary shoot proliferation of curd explants on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with an auxin and a cytokinin ... [more ▼]

In vitro propagation of cauliflower has generally been achieved through axillary shoot proliferation of curd explants on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with an auxin and a cytokinin. Recently, it has been shown (Vandemoortele 1999) that a soaking in sucrose (-2 MPa for 24 h) of cauliflower curd explants, before culture without any growth regulator, also induced axillary branching. The later procedure avoids the phenomenon of hyperhydricity in the shoots formed. Axillary shooting obtained by the two methods appears to be mediated by modifications of internal cytokinin levels. The osmotic pretreatment did not influence auxin levels, but induced a zeatin and a zeatin riboside levels increase. Curd explants cultured with the usual procedure (on MS medium supplemented with 5 mu mol/L BA and 0.5 mu mol/L NAA) showed a zeatin and zeatin riboside levels increase of the same magnitude and a higher one for isopentenyl adenine and isopentenyl adenosine. The modification of the cytokinin status in the curd explants subjected to a short osmotic pretreatment thus should be less favourable for hyperhydricity. [less ▲]

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See detailOSS 117. Le monde comme terrain de jeu
Dozo, Björn-Olav ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2012)

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See detailLes ossements animaux du lieu-dit "Les Saudrillons"
Gabriel, Annick ULg

in De Braekeleer, R. (Ed.) Quevaucamps, Etude des ossements humains découverts en 1969 au lieu-dit "Les Saudrillons" (1997)

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See detailOssian, Hermann and the Jew's-harp. Images of the Celtic languages from 1600 to 1800
Droixhe, Daniel ULg

in Brown, T. (Ed.) Celticism (1996)

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See detailThe OST risk tool performs consistently for identifying women at risk of osteoporosis across populations
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Richy, Florent

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2004, June)

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See detailOstbelgiens „Stunde Null“? Eliten aus Eupen und Malmedy vor und nach 1944
Brüll, Christoph ULg; Herrebout, Els; Quadflieg, Peter

Book published by Archives générales du Royaume (2013)

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See detailOstéite sternale et médiastinite après chirurgie de pontage aorto-coronaire
DETROZ, B.; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier ULg; Limet, Raymond ULg

in Annales de Chirurgie (1991), 45(2), 128-35

Between 1980 and 1987, 31 cases of osteitis (n = 9) and/or mediastinitis (n = 22) were observed after 2,801 consecutive aorto-coronary bypasses (1.1%). Three types of treatment were used: 1) sternal ... [more ▼]

Between 1980 and 1987, 31 cases of osteitis (n = 9) and/or mediastinitis (n = 22) were observed after 2,801 consecutive aorto-coronary bypasses (1.1%). Three types of treatment were used: 1) sternal debridement with osteosynthesis and continuous mediastinal irrigation (n = 25); 2) sternal and mediastinal debridement with open drainage without osteosynthesis (n = 2); 3) incision and debridement of sternal abscesses (n = 4). The overall mortality was 26% (8/31), i.e. 11% (1/9) for isolated osteitis and 32% (7/22) for mediastinitis. Four factors were statistically associated with infection: reoperation for hemorrhage (19.4%, p less than 0.001); preoperative diabetes (25%, p less than 0.001), postoperative low cardiac output (55%, p less than 0.001), postoperative respiratory insufficiency (45%, p less than 0.001). [less ▲]

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See detailOsteo-onychodysplasie héréditaire (Nail Patella Syndrome)
Vanhooteghem, Olivier ULg; Henrijean, A.; Richert, Bertrand ULg et al

in Annales de Dermatologie et de Vénéréologie (2001), 128(10, Pt 1), 1063-7

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See detailOsteoarthritic patients with high cartilage turnover show increased responsiveness to the cartilage protecting effects of glucosamine sulphate
Christgau, Stephan; Henrotin, Yves ULg; Tanko, Laszlo B et al

in Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology (2004), 22(1, JAN-FEB), 36-42

Objective Glucosamine sulphate has been shown in a large double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial to prevent structural damage and improve clinical symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated ... [more ▼]

Objective Glucosamine sulphate has been shown in a large double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial to prevent structural damage and improve clinical symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated whether early response in a newly developed biochemical marker of collagen type II degradation (CTX-II, CartiLaps ELISA) could reflect the long-term preservation of hyaline cartilage. Methods Study subjects comprised 212 knee OA patients participating in a clinical trial of the effects of glucosamine sulphate. Disease symptoms were assessed quarterly by WOMAC scoring and X-ray analysis was performed at baseline and after 3 years. Urine samples were obtained at baseline and after 1, 2 and 3 years for measurement in the CartiLaps assay. The measurements were corrected for creatinine. Results At baseline the patients had an average concentration of urinary CTX-II of 222.4 +/- 159.5 ng/mmol creatinine. This was significantly above the CTX-II levels measured in urine samples from 415 healthy controls (169.1 +/- 92.3 ng/mmol, p < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in the CTX-II response in the placebo group and the glucosamine treated group. However, those with high cartilage turnover presented a significant decrease in CTX-II after 12-month glucosamine treatment. Thus, thee group with CTX II concentrations above normal average + ISD decreased 15.5 % after 12-month therapy. The 12 months change in CTX-II in OA patients with elevated CTX-II at baseline correlated with the change in average joint space width observed after 36 months (R = 0.43, p < 0.05). Increased baseline levels of CTX-II were associated with a worsening of the WOMAC index (p < 0.01). Conclusion The data indicate that measurement of urinary collagen type H C-telopeptide fragments enables the identification of OA patients with high cartilage turnover who at the same time are most responsive to therapy with structure modifying drugs. [less ▲]

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See detailOsteoarthritis and obesity: Experimental models.
Gabay, Odile; Hall, David; Berenbaum, Francis et al

in Joint Bone Spine (2008), 75

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disease. Different risk factors have been identified such as aging and obesity and different models have been used to study the impact of obesity and overweight in ... [more ▼]

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disease. Different risk factors have been identified such as aging and obesity and different models have been used to study the impact of obesity and overweight in this pathology. The field the more studied is in vitro cartilage submitted to mechanical stresses. Four different stresses can be applied on this tissue: shear stress, loading, tensile stress (stretching) and hydrostatic pressure. The signal transduction to the chondrocyte and to the nucleus of the cell is a large field of investigation named mechano-transduction. The response of cartilage depends on quality of subchondral bone as well. So, more and more teams are studying the impact of mechanical stresses on bone, mainly by stretching osteoblasts or by submitting them to a fluid shear stress. Recently, a new model of bone compression has been set up, with osteoblasts in their own extracellular matrix. Finally the third field studied is the role of adipokines, mediators playing a key role in obesity, on the aetiology of OA. Adipokines like leptin, resistin, adiponectin and visfatin, seems to play a pro-inflammatory role in arthritis. Studying the role of obesity in OA could be more complex than expected. The link between OA and obesity may not simply be due to high mechanical stresses applied on the tissues, but soluble mediators may play an important role in the onset of OA in obese patients. [less ▲]

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See detailOsteoarthritis in 2010
Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Therapy (2010), 7(6), 575-577

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See detailOsteoarthritis of the knee and glucosamine: a commentary
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Altman, R. D.

in Osteoporosis International (2006, March), 17(Suppl.1), 111

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See detailOsteoarthritis year 2011 in review: biochemical markers of osteoarthritis: an overview of research and initiatives.
Henrotin, Yves ULg

in Osteoarthritis and cartilage / OARS, Osteoarthritis Research Society (2012), 20(3), 215-7

The "year in review" session is a key moment of the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) Congress. This is a unique opportunity for opinion leaders to summarize and comment the recent ... [more ▼]

The "year in review" session is a key moment of the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) Congress. This is a unique opportunity for opinion leaders to summarize and comment the recent advances in one particular field of osteoarthritis research. This review is a summary of selected studies related to soluble biomarkers published between September 1st, 2010 and August 30th, 2011 and identified by a pubmed search using the terms "biomarkers" and "osteoarthritis". In addition, I have selected some works presented during the 2011 OARSI Congress. This year was dominated by the publication of a consensus paper on the qualification of osteoarthritis (OA) biomarkers by the OARSI/Food Drug Administration (FDA) Osteoarthritis Biomarkers Working Group, and of proteomes of chondrocyte vesicles, urine and serum. [less ▲]

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See detailOsteoarthritis, magnetic resonance imaging, and biochemical markers: a one year prospective study
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Collette, Julien ULg; Kothari, M. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2006), 65(8), 1050-1054

Objective: To investigate the relation between biochemical markers of bone, cartilage, and synovial remodelling and the structural progression of knee osteoarthritis. Methods: 62 patients of both sexes ... [more ▼]

Objective: To investigate the relation between biochemical markers of bone, cartilage, and synovial remodelling and the structural progression of knee osteoarthritis. Methods: 62 patients of both sexes with knee osteoarthritis were followed prospectively for one year. From magnetic resonance imaging ( MRI), done at baseline and after one year, the volume and thickness of cartilage of the femur, the medial tibia, and the lateral tibia were assessed. A whole organ magnetic resonance imaging score ( WORMS) of the knee was calculated for each patient at baseline and at the one year visits. This score consists in a validated, semiquantitative scoring system for whole organ assessment of the knee in osteoarthritis using MRI. Biochemical markers ( serum hyaluronic acid, osteocalcin, cartilage glycoprotein 39 ( YKL-40), cartilage oligomeric matrix protein ( COMP), and C-telopeptide of type I collagen ( CTX-I), and urine C-telopeptide of type II collagen ( CTX-II)) were measured at baseline and after three months. Results: Baseline markers were not correlated with one year changes observed in cartilage volume and thickness. However, an increase in CTX-II after three months was significantly correlated with a one year decrease in mean thickness of medial tibial and lateral tibial cartilage. Patients in the highest quartile of three month changes in CTX-II experienced a mean loss of 0.07 ( 0.08) mm of their medial thickness, compared with a mean increase of 0.05 ( 0.19) mm for patients in the lowest quartile ( p = 0.04) Multiple regression analysis showed that high baseline levels of hyaluronic acid are predictive of a worsening in WORMS ( p = 0.004). Conclusions: These results suggest that a single measurement of serum hyaluronic acid or short term changes in urine CTX-II could identify patients at greatest risk of progression of osteoarthritis. [less ▲]

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See detailOsteoblast : a cell under compression
Sanchez, Christelle ULg

Conference (2007)

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See detailOsteoblast-related transcription factors Runx2 (Cbfa1/AML3) and MSX2 mediate the expression of bone sialoprotein in human metastatic breast cancer cells
Barnes, G. L.; Javed, A.; Waller, S. M. et al

in Cancer Research (2003), 63(10), 2631-2637

Human breast cancers are known to preferentially metastasize to skeletal sites, however, the mechanisms that mediate the skeletal preference (orthotropism) of specific types of cancers remains poorly ... [more ▼]

Human breast cancers are known to preferentially metastasize to skeletal sites, however, the mechanisms that mediate the skeletal preference (orthotropism) of specific types of cancers remains poorly understood. There is a significant clinical correlation between the expression of bone sialoprotein (BSP) and skeletal metastasis of breast cancers. Our laboratory, as well as others, have proposed the concept that skeletal selective metastasis and associated disease may be attributable to a mimicry of skeletal cellular phenotypes by metastasizing cancer cells. We hypothesize that breast cancer cell expression of phenotypic properties of skeletal cell types, including BSP as one component of that phenotype, is the result of ectopic expression or activity of one or more central transcriptional regulators of bone cell gene expression. To test this hypothesis, we examined the molecular mechanisms that regulate bsp expression in human breast cancer cell lines with previously characterized metastatic potentials. Our results demonstrate that the majority of the distal bsp promoter sequences act to repress BSP expression in cancer cells and that most of the promoter activity resides in the proximal -110 by of the bsp promoter. In this region, we identified a putative Runx binding element providing a basis for a mechanism for skeletal gene activation. Our results demonstrate that Runx2 is ectopically expressed in breast cancer cells and that one isoform of Runx2 can activate bsp expression in these cells. In addition, we observe that bsp expression is additionally regulated by the homeodomain factor Msx2, another regulator of osteoblast-associated genes. Thus, this is the first report of osteoblast-related transcription factors being expressed in human breast cancer cells and provides a component of a mechanism that may explain the osteoblastic phenotype of human breast cancer cells that preferentially metastasize to bone. [less ▲]

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See detailOsteoblast: A cell under compression.
Sanchez, Christelle ULg; Gabay, Odile; Henrotin, Yves ULg et al

in Bio-medical Materials & Engineering (2008), 18(4-5), 221-4

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