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See detailLow flow regionalisation in the Walloon Region
Grandry, Maud ULg; Verstraete, Arnaud; Gailliez, Sébastien et al

Report (2012)

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See detailLow frequency electromagnetic waves in periodic structures
Guenneau, S.; Nicolet, A.; Geuzaine, Christophe ULg et al

in International Journal of Applied Electromagnetics and Mechanics (2004), 19

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See detailLow frequency rythms in human DNA sequences: A key to the organization of gene location and orientation?
Nicolay, Samuel ULg; Argoul, F.; Touchon, M. et al

in Physical Review Letters (2004), 93(10), 108101

We explore large-scale nucleotide compositional fluctuations of the human genome using multi- resolution techniques. Analysis of the GC content and of the AT and GC skews reveals the existence of rhythms ... [more ▼]

We explore large-scale nucleotide compositional fluctuations of the human genome using multi- resolution techniques. Analysis of the GC content and of the AT and GC skews reveals the existence of rhythms with two main periods of 110 20 kb and 400 50 kb that enlighten a remarkable cooperative gene organization. We show that the observed nonlinear oscillations are likely to display all the characteristic features of chaotic strange attractors which suggests a very attractive deterministic picture: gene orientation and location, in relation with the structure and dynamics of chromatin, might be governed by a low-dimensional nonlinear dynamical system. [less ▲]

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See detailLow GH hypophyseal adenomas with acromegaly exhibit undetectable levels of messenger RNA of normal GH
Pagesy, P.; Rentier-Delrue, Françoise ULg; Bresson, D. et al

in Annals of Endocrinology (1987), 48

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See detailLow incidence of anti-osteoporosis treatment after hip fracture.
Rabenda, Véronique ULg; Vanoverloop, Johan; Fabri, Valerie et al

in Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. American Volume (2008), 90(10), 2142-8

BACKGROUND: Following hip fracture, pharmacologic treatment can reduce the rate of subsequent fragility fractures. The objective of the present study was to assess the proportion of patients who are ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Following hip fracture, pharmacologic treatment can reduce the rate of subsequent fragility fractures. The objective of the present study was to assess the proportion of patients who are managed with bisphosphonates or selective estrogen-receptor modulators after hip fracture and to evaluate, among those managed with alendronate, the twelve-month compliance and persistence with treatment. METHODS: Data were gathered from health insurance companies and were collected by AIM (Agence Intermutualiste) for the Belgian National Social Security Institute (INAMI). We selected all postmenopausal women who had been hospitalized for a hip fracture between April 2001 and June 2004 and had not been previously managed with bisphosphonates. Patients who had received alendronate treatment after the hip fracture were categorized according to their formulation use during the follow-up study (daily, weekly, daily followed by weekly, or weekly followed by weekly). Compliance at twelve months was quantified with use of the medication possession ratio (i.e., the number of days of alendronate supplied during the first year of treatment, divided by 365). Persistence with prescribed treatment was calculated as the number of days from the initial prescription to a lapse of more than five weeks after completion of the previous prescription refill. The cumulative treatment persistence rate was determined with use of Kaplan-Meier survival curves. RESULTS: A total of 23,146 patients who had sustained a hip fracture were identified. Of these patients, 6% received treatment during the study period: 4.6% received alendronate, 0.7% received risedronate, and 0.7% received raloxifene. Bisphosphonate treatment was dispensed to 2.6% and 3.6% of the patients within six months and one year after the occurrence of the hip fracture, respectively. Among women who received alendronate daily (n = 124) or weekly (n = 182) and were followed for at least one year after the hip fracture, the twelve-month mean medication possession ratio was 67% (65.9% in the daily group and 67.7% in the weekly group). The analysis of persistence with treatment included a total of 726 patients (142 in the daily group, 261 in the weekly group, and 323 in the switch group). At twelve months, the rate of persistence was 41% and the median duration of persistence was 40.3 weeks. CONCLUSIONS: The vast majority of patients who experience a hip fracture do not take anti-osteoporotic therapy after the fracture. Furthermore, among patients who begin alendronate treatment after the fracture, the adherence to treatment decreases over time and remains suboptimal. [less ▲]

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See detailLow incidence of osteoporosis treatment after hip fracture
Rabenda, Véronique ULg; Mertens, Raf; Fabri, Valérie et al

in Osteoporosis International (2007, March), 18(Suppl.1), 72-73

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See detailLow macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes in Southern Argentina.
Rubinstein, Gabriela; Amoroso, Ana Maria ULg; Bavdaz, Barbara et al

in International journal of antimicrobial agents (2005), 25(5), 450-2

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See detailLow molecular weight heparin and central neural blockade
BRICHANT, Jean-François ULg

in BRICHANT, Jean-François (Ed.) Low molecular weight heparin and central neural blockade (1997)

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See detailLow molecular weight poly (2-dimethylamino ethylmethacrylate) polymers with controlled positioned fluorescent labeling: Synthesis, characterization and in vitro interaction with human endothelial cells.
Flebus, Luca ULg; Lombart, François ULg; Sevrin, Chantal et al

in International journal of pharmaceutics (2015), 478(1), 278-287

Poly (2-dimethylamino ethylmethacrylate) (PDMAEMA) is an attractive non-degradable polymer studied as nonviral vector for gene delivery but it can be also adopted for delivery of other biopharmaceutical ... [more ▼]

Poly (2-dimethylamino ethylmethacrylate) (PDMAEMA) is an attractive non-degradable polymer studied as nonviral vector for gene delivery but it can be also adopted for delivery of other biopharmaceutical drugs. As a parenteral carrier, the PDMAEMA free form (FF) might interact with tissues and cells. Few data are available on its selective internalization and efflux from cells, while the majority of studies published have followed the distribution of DNA complexed with PDMAEMA. In order to address polycation safety, the first aim was to synthesize by atom transfer radical polymerisation (ATRP) fluorescent labeled PDMAEMA of low molecular weight (Mw) (below 15kDa), controlling the position and density of fluorescein. The second goal was to analyze the possible difference in uptake and subcellular distribution of this labeled FF polycation between human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and hCMEC/D3 cells. These two cell lines have been chosen in order to detect selectivity towards the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In both cases, polycation was detected along the plasma membrane followed by progressive migration to the peri-nuclear region, where it overlapped with lysosomal structures. The analysis by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of the PDMAEMA uptake by hCMEC/D3 cells showed a significant (p<0.05) inhibition (40%) in presence of 2-dexoxy-d-glucose inhibitor, a result supporting an energy-dependence mechanism(s). Cytotoxicity study showed that low Mw PDMAEMA (10kDa) lead to a minor cytotoxicity compared to the higher ones. As main conclusion this study highlights the similitude in cell trafficking of FF PDMAEMA and data previously reported for PDMAEMA/DNA complexes. [less ▲]

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See detailLow noise vacuum-packaged MEMS closed-loop accelerometer using sixth-order multi-feedback loops and local resonator sigma-delta modulators
Chen, F; Yuan, W; Chang, H et al

in Proceedings of "IEEE MEMS Conf. : San Francisco- Janvier 2014" (2014, January)

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See detailA low rate of trisomy 21 in twin-pregnancies: A cytogenetics retrospective study of 278 cases
Jamar, Mauricette ULg; Lemarchal, C.; Koulischer, Lucien ULg et al

in Genetic Counseling (2003), 14(4), 395-400

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See detailLow risk in fractures in long-term treatment of Paget’s disease with tiludronate
Audran, M; Combe, B; Michaut, S et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (1996), 11(S1), 372

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See detailLow Sickle Cell Disease Mortality In Belgium and Benefit From Hydroxyurea Therapy
Lê, Phu-Quoc; Dedeken, Laurence; Gulbis, Beatrice et al

Poster (2013)

In Western countries, mortality among patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) has decreased in the last decades by means of neonatal screening (NS), infectious prophylaxis and care improvements. The major ... [more ▼]

In Western countries, mortality among patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) has decreased in the last decades by means of neonatal screening (NS), infectious prophylaxis and care improvements. The major causes of death in children include acute chest syndrome, sepsis, splenic sequestration, stroke, aplastic crisis while in adults end-stage organ failure contributes also to premature death. Hydroxyurea (HU) and stem cell transplantation (SCT) are used in Belgium for more than 20 years but their possible influences on survival have not been yet analyzed. The Belgian SCD Registry was created in 2008 including patients of 8 centres. All available data in 2008 were retrospectively encoded in the database. After 2008 and until 2012, all data were recorded prospectively for already registered patients as well as newly diagnosed subjects. Data were registered from NS or from diagnosis (first contact) until last follow up (FU) visit, SCT or death. Data included diagnosis, demography and outcome data. After SCT, only vital status and cause of death were recorded. Up to date, data from 470 pts are recorded (224 males), 412 are HbSS, 14 HbSβ0, 7 HbSβ+ and 37 HbSC. The median age at diagnosis and at last FU was respectively 0.7 year (y) and 9.9 y. The FU for the whole cohort was 3810 patient-years (PY) and with 136 patients aged over 18y, their FU during adulthood accounted for 520 PY. Thirteen patients died (2.8%). The mortality per 100-PY was 0.34 and the median age at death was 14.5 y (range, 1.5-23.7 y). All deaths occurred in HbSS patients, 5 after SCT and 8 due to an acute event. Complete data set is missing for 3 of the 8 patients. For the 5 well documented SCD related deaths, causes were: hemorrhagic stroke (2), sepsis due to S. pneumoniae (1), aplastic crisis (1) and infection during stay in homeland (1). At last FU, 91 patients were transplanted, 182 were on HU, 7 on HU + chronic transfusion (CT), 19 on CT (4 after HU treatment). The remaining 171 patients never had disease modifying therapy (DMT). Compared with the latter, mortality rate for those on HU was significantly reduced (0.1 vs 0.5/100-PY) while patients on HU have longer FU and are older at last FU (Table 1). Among 91 patients transplanted at a median age 6.9 y, 5 died: 3 from acute transplant related toxicity, 1 from secondary acute myeloblastic leukemia after cGVHD, and 1 is unexplained more than 7 years post SCT. The data issued from the most recent NS cohorts report a low death rate during childhood ranging from 0.13 to 0.52. Even if our Belgian cohort is not exclusively issued from neonatal diagnosis, the observed death rate is low (0.34/100-PY). Several methodological biases are present in this partially retrospective study (incomplete or unavailable data, lost of FU, no information if death occurred before the first contact in a center, …). Nevertheless our low mortality is not underestimated since 1) most patients were followed since infancy and during a long period (3810 PY); 2) the FU during adulthood (period of increased mortality) accounted for 520 PY; 3) our cohort represents a very large part of the Belgian SCD population since a national inquiry performed in 2007 estimated the whole SCD population to 500. The effect of HU on mortality has been reported in adults and more recently in children. Despite longer FU and older age at last FU, our data confirms those previously results. With only one case, death by infection is rare while SCT complications contributed to about 40 % of deaths. Even if SCT is the only curative option for SCD, it encompasses a risk of mortality. As life expectancy of SCD patients has been extended which is confirmed by our results (especially for patients on HU), SCT should be reserved for clinically severe cases. Population-based prospective studies evaluating the survival in transplanted and non transplanted patients are needed. [less ▲]

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See detailLow sodium diet in essential hypertension- Effect on blood cell ions and hemodynamic parameters
Krzesinski, Jean-Marie ULg; Du, Fenghe; Pequeux, Marie-Louise et al

in American Journal of Hypertension : Journal of the American Society of Hypertension (1992), 5

The influence of salt restriction for 3 months on blood pressure, peripheral vascular resistance (observed by occlusive plethysmography), erythrocyte sodium, platelet calcium, and pH, was studied in eight ... [more ▼]

The influence of salt restriction for 3 months on blood pressure, peripheral vascular resistance (observed by occlusive plethysmography), erythrocyte sodium, platelet calcium, and pH, was studied in eight untreated essential hypertensive patients. A low salt diet decreases blood pressure, vascular resistances, erythrocyte sodium, and platelet calcium, but not platelet pH. A strong positive correlation was noted between baseline platelet calcium and vascular resistances (r=0.95, P < .01). But during the salt restriction period, a negative correlation has been observed between the changes in these parameters, which casts doubt on the use of the platelet as a mode of the smooth muscle cell. [less ▲]

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See detailLow T-cell chimerism is not followed by graft rejection after nonmyeloablative stem cell transplantation (NMSCT) with CD34-selected PBSC.
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Baudoux, Etienne ULg; Frere, Pascale ULg et al

in Bone Marrow Transplantation (2003), 32(8), 829-34

We investigate the feasibility of CD34-selected peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantation followed by pre-emptive CD8-depleted donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) after a minimal conditioning regimen ... [more ▼]

We investigate the feasibility of CD34-selected peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantation followed by pre-emptive CD8-depleted donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) after a minimal conditioning regimen. Six patients with advanced hematological malignancies ineligible for a conventional myeloablative transplant (n=5) or metastatic renal cell carcinoma (n=1), and with an HLA-identical (n=4) or alternative (n=2) donor were included. The nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen consisted in 2 Gy TBI alone (n=4), 2 Gy TBI and fludarabine (RCC patient, n=1) or cyclophosphamide and fludarabine (patient who had previously received 12 Gy TBI, n=1). Post transplant immunosuppression was carried out with cyclosporin (CyA) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). Initial engraftment was achieved in all patients. One out of six patients (17%) experienced grade > or =2 acute GVHD only after abrupt cyclosporin discontinuation and alpha interferon therapy for life-threatening tumor progression. T-cell chimerism was 23% (19-30) on day 28, 32% (10-35) on day 100, 78% (49-95) on day 180 and 99.5% (99-100) on day 365. Three out of four patients who had measurable disease before the transplant experienced a complete response. We conclude that CD34-selected NMSCT followed by CD8-depleted DLI is feasible and preserves engraftment and apparently also the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect. Further studies are needed to confirm this encouraging preliminary report. [less ▲]

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See detailLow temperature assembly method of microfluidic bio-molecules detection device
Van Loo, Stéphanie ULg; Stoukatch, Serguei ULg; Van Overstraeten-Schlögel, Nancy et al

in Suga, Tadatomo; Takagi, Hideki; Higurashi, Heiji (Eds.) 2012 3rd IEEE International Workshop on Low Temperature Bonding for 3D Integration (LTB-3D 2012) (2012, May 22)

We developed a microfluidic device for the detection of bio-molecules. The active part of the device is a biofunctionalized interdigitated capacitive sensor. The microsystem consists of a sensor on ... [more ▼]

We developed a microfluidic device for the detection of bio-molecules. The active part of the device is a biofunctionalized interdigitated capacitive sensor. The microsystem consists of a sensor on silicon chip, a microfluidic channel formed by photo-patternable resist and a plastic cover. We implemented a low temperature packaging process to assemble the sensor and prevent the biological material from degradation. [less ▲]

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See detailLow temperature crystallization of yttrium orthoferrite by organic acid-assisted sol-gel synthesis
Stevens, Frédéric ULg; Cloots, Rudi ULg; Poelman, D. et al

in Materials Letters (2014), 114

Yttrium orthoferrite (YFeO3) is a promising material for visible light photocatalytic applications due to its band gap of 2.2-2.6 eV. However, during the synthesis of YFeO3, unwanted composition can be ... [more ▼]

Yttrium orthoferrite (YFeO3) is a promising material for visible light photocatalytic applications due to its band gap of 2.2-2.6 eV. However, during the synthesis of YFeO3, unwanted composition can be obtained and the crystallization requires temperatures as high as 850 C. Powders of YFeO3 were prepared using a sol-gel method with and without organic acids (citric acid, tartaric acid, malonic acid and oxalic acid) used as organic modifiers. The band gap of these powders was measured by diffuse reflection spectroscopy, and the crystallinity and crystalline phase content were characterized by X-ray diffraction. Organic acids allow a higher purity and facilitate crystallization. This work aims to produce YFeO3 powders at the lowest possible temperature. Citric acid was found to be the best additive: it reduces the crystallization temperature below 450 C. This opens new perspectives such as the deposition of crystalline YFeO3 thin films onto conductive glass for water-splitting applications. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. [less ▲]

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