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See detailMutations AIP chez les jeunes patients en dessous de 30 ans avec adénome hypophysaire agressif
Beckers, Albert ULg; Tichomirowa, M.; Barlier, A. et al

in Annales d'Endocrinologie (2010, September), 71(5), 397

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See detailMutations AIP chez les jeunes patients en-dessous de 30 ans avec adénome hypophysaire agressif
Beckers, Albert ULg; Tichomirowa, M.; Barlier, A. et al

in 27ème Congrès de la Société Française d'Endocrinologie - Deauville, 29 septembre - 2 octobre 2010 (2010, September)

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See detailMutations des localisations des services et mutations urbaines. Questionnements et perspectives
Merenne-Schoumaker, Bernadette ULg

in Revista de Geografia, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (2002), 17(2), 41-56

The aim of this paper is to analyse the relationships between urban mutations and service locations. Work is developed in four times: facts, causes, consequences and prospects. Without doubt, the spatial ... [more ▼]

The aim of this paper is to analyse the relationships between urban mutations and service locations. Work is developed in four times: facts, causes, consequences and prospects. Without doubt, the spatial transfers of service activities can be considered as both, a cause and a consequence of urban sprawl. It is related to the release of mobility constraints, to the specific changes that affected many economic activities, and also to the new behaviours of many actors (customers/ visitors, property developers and public authorities). As this evolution is incompatible with the objectives of sustainable urban development, several action possibilities can be proposed: new management of the daily mobilities, reduction in space consumption and new governance. [less ▲]

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See detailLes mutations du mouvement associatif “immigré” en Belgique
Martiniello, Marco ULg

Scientific conference (1996, April 01)

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See detailMutations in FKBP10 cause recessive osteogenesis imperfecta and bruck syndrome.
Kelley, B. P.; Malfait, F.; Bonafe, L. et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (2011)

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder of connective tissue characterized by bone fragility and alteration in synthesis and post-translational modification of type I collagen. Autosomal ... [more ▼]

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder of connective tissue characterized by bone fragility and alteration in synthesis and post-translational modification of type I collagen. Autosomal dominant OI is caused by mutations in the genes (COL1A1 or COL1A2) encoding the chains of type I collagen. Bruck syndrome is a recessive disorder featuring congenital contractures in addition to bone fragility; Bruck syndrome type 2 is caused by mutations in PLOD2 encoding collagen lysyl hydroxylase, while Bruck Syndrome type 1 has been mapped to 17q12 but the gene has remained elusive so far. Recently, the molecular spectrum of OI has been expanded with the description of the basis of a unique post-translational modification of type I procollagen, i.e. 3-prolyl-hydroxylation. Three proteins, cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP), prolyl-3-hydroxylase-1 (P3H1, encoded by the LEPRE1 gene), and the prolyl cis-trans isomerase cyclophilin-B (PPIB) form a complex that is required for fibrillar collagen 3-prolyl-hydroxylation and mutations in each gene have been shown to cause recessive forms of OI. Since then, an additional putative collagen chaperone complex, composed of FKBP10 (also known as FKBP65) and SERPINH1 (also known as HSP47), has also been shown to be mutated in recessive OI. Here, we describe five families with OI-like bone fragility in association with congenital contractures who all had FKBP10 mutations. Given the previous mapping of Bruck syndrome type 1 to the chromosomal region containing FKBP10, we conclude that FKBP10 mutations are the cause of Bruck syndrome type 1. (c) 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. [less ▲]

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See detailMutations in GRIN2A and GRIN2B encoding regulatory subunits of NMDA receptors cause variable neurodevelopmental phenotypes.
Endele, Sabine; Rosenberger, Georg; Geider, Kirsten et al

in Nature Genetics (2010), 42(11), 1021-6

N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors mediate excitatory neurotransmission in the mammalian brain. Two glycine-binding NR1 subunits and two glutamate-binding NR2 subunits each form highly Ca(2 ... [more ▼]

N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors mediate excitatory neurotransmission in the mammalian brain. Two glycine-binding NR1 subunits and two glutamate-binding NR2 subunits each form highly Ca(2)(+)-permeable cation channels which are blocked by extracellular Mg(2)(+) in a voltage-dependent manner. Either GRIN2B or GRIN2A, encoding the NMDA receptor subunits NR2B and NR2A, was found to be disrupted by chromosome translocation breakpoints in individuals with mental retardation and/or epilepsy. Sequencing of GRIN2B in 468 individuals with mental retardation revealed four de novo mutations: a frameshift, a missense and two splice-site mutations. In another cohort of 127 individuals with idiopathic epilepsy and/or mental retardation, we discovered a GRIN2A nonsense mutation in a three-generation family. In a girl with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy, we identified the de novo GRIN2A mutation c.1845C>A predicting the amino acid substitution p.N615K. Analysis of NR1-NR2A(N615K) (NR2A subunit with the p.N615K alteration) receptor currents revealed a loss of the Mg(2)(+) block and a decrease in Ca(2)(+) permeability. Our findings suggest that disturbances in the neuronal electrophysiological balance during development result in variable neurological phenotypes depending on which NR2 subunit of NMDA receptors is affected. [less ▲]

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See detailMutations in PYCR1 cause cutis laxa with progeroid features.
Reversade, Bruno; Escande-Beillard, Nathalie; Dimopoulou, Aikaterini et al

in Nature Genetics (2009), 41(9), 1016-21

Autosomal recessive cutis laxa (ARCL) describes a group of syndromal disorders that are often associated with a progeroid appearance, lax and wrinkled skin, osteopenia and mental retardation. Homozygosity ... [more ▼]

Autosomal recessive cutis laxa (ARCL) describes a group of syndromal disorders that are often associated with a progeroid appearance, lax and wrinkled skin, osteopenia and mental retardation. Homozygosity mapping in several kindreds with ARCL identified a candidate region on chromosome 17q25. By high-throughput sequencing of the entire candidate region, we detected disease-causing mutations in the gene PYCR1. We found that the gene product, an enzyme involved in proline metabolism, localizes to mitochondria. Altered mitochondrial morphology, membrane potential and increased apoptosis rate upon oxidative stress were evident in fibroblasts from affected individuals. Knockdown of the orthologous genes in Xenopus and zebrafish led to epidermal hypoplasia and blistering that was accompanied by a massive increase of apoptosis. Our findings link mutations in PYCR1 to altered mitochondrial function and progeroid changes in connective tissues. [less ▲]

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See detailMutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein gene are not highly prevalent among subjects with sporadic pituitary adenomas.
Barlier, Anne; Vanbellinghen, Jean-François ULg; Daly, Adrian ULg et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (2007), 92(5), 1952-5

CONTEXT: Limited screening suggests that three germline mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene are not involved in sporadic pituitary tumorigenesis. Multiple novel ... [more ▼]

CONTEXT: Limited screening suggests that three germline mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene are not involved in sporadic pituitary tumorigenesis. Multiple novel mutations of this gene have since been identified in familial isolated pituitary adenoma cohorts. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to undertake full AIP coding sequence screening to assess for the presence of germline and somatic mutations in European Union subjects with sporadic pituitary tumors. DESIGN: The study design was the analysis of DNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes and analysis of exons 1-6 and paraexonic intron sequences of AIP. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was used to screen separate sporadic pituitary tumor tissue samples for discrete and extensive deletions or mutations of the AIP gene. Setting: The study was conducted in university tertiary referral Clinical Genetics, Molecular Biology, and Endocrinology Departments. RESULTS: In 107 patients [prolactinomas (n =49), nonfunctioning tumors (n = 29), somatotropinomas (n = 26), ACTH-secreting tumors (n = 2), TSH-secreting tumors (n = 1)], no germline mutations of AIP were demonstrated. Among a group of 41 tumor samples from other subjects, a novel AIP mutation (R22X) was found in one sample in which the corresponding allele was deleted; follow-up screening of the patient demonstrated a germline R22X AIP mutation. CONCLUSIONS: AIP mutations do not appear to play a prominent role in sporadic pituitary tumorigenesis in this population of European subjects. [less ▲]

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See detailMutations In The Bovine Leukemia-Virus Tax Protein Can Abrogate The Long Terminal Repeat-Directed Transactivating Activity Without Concomitant Loss Of Transforming Potential
Willems, Luc ULg; Grimonpont, C.; Heremans, H. et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (1992), 89(9),

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See detailMutations in the ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein-1 (GDAP1) gene in intermediate type autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy
Senderek, J.; Bergmann, C.; RAMAEKERS, Vincent ULg et al

in Brain (2003), 126(3), 642-649

Mutations in the gene for the ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein-1 (GDAP1) on 8q21 recently were reported to cause autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) sensorimotor neuropathy ... [more ▼]

Mutations in the gene for the ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein-1 (GDAP1) on 8q21 recently were reported to cause autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) sensorimotor neuropathy. Neurophysiology and nerve pathology were heterogeneous in these cases: a subset of GDAP1 mutations was associated with peripheral nerve demyelination, whereas others resulted in axonal degeneration. In this study, we identified two novel mutations disrupting the GDAP1 reading frame. Homozygosity for a single base pair insertion in exon 3 (c.349_350insT) was observed in affected children from a Turkish inbred pedigree. The other novel allele detected in a German patient was a homozygous mutation of the intron 4 donor splice site (c.579 + 1G>A). Patients with GDAP1 mutations displayed severe, early childhood-onset CMT neuropathy with prominent pes equinovarus deformity and impairment of hand muscles. Nerve conduction velocities were between 25 and 35 m/s and peripheral nerve pathology showed axonal as well as demyelinating changes. These findings fitted the definition of intermediate type CMT and further support the view that GDAP1 is vital for both, axonal integrity and Schwann cell properties. [less ▲]

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See detailMutations in the immunosuppressive peptide of bovine leukema virus affect fusion and infectivity in vivo
GATOT, Jean-Stéphane ULg; Kettmann, Richard ULg; Callebaut-Mornon, Isabelle et al

in Virus Research (1997), 47(2-Special Issue), 103

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See detailMutations in the inositol polyphosphate-5-phosphatase E gene link phosphatidyl inositol signaling to the ciliopathies
Bielas, S. L.; Silhavy, J. L.; Brancati, F. et al

in Nature Genetics (2009), 41

Phosphotidylinositol (PtdIns) signaling is tightly regulated both spatially and temporally by subcellularly localized PtdIns kinases and phosphatases that dynamically alter downstream signaling events1 ... [more ▼]

Phosphotidylinositol (PtdIns) signaling is tightly regulated both spatially and temporally by subcellularly localized PtdIns kinases and phosphatases that dynamically alter downstream signaling events1. Joubert syndrome is characterized by a specific midbrain-hindbrain malformation (‘molar tooth sign’), variably associated retinal dystrophy, nephronophthisis, liver fibrosis and polydactyly2 and is included in the newly emerging group of ‘ciliopathies’. In individuals with Joubert disease genetically linked to JBTS1, we identified mutations in the INPP5E gene, encoding inositol polyphosphate-5-phosphatase E, which hydrolyzes the 5-phosphate of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and PtdIns(4,5)P2. Mutations clustered in the phosphatase domain and impaired 5-phosphatase activity, resulting in altered cellular PtdIns ratios. INPP5E localized to cilia in major organs affected by Joubert syndrome, and mutations promoted premature destabilization of cilia in response to stimulation. These data link PtdIns signaling to the primary cilium, a cellular structure that is becoming increasingly recognized for its role in mediating cell signals and neuronal function [less ▲]

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See detailMutations in the T (brachyury) gene cause a novel syndrome consisting of sacral agenesis, abnormal ossification of the vertebral bodies and a persistent notochordal canal.
Postma, A. V.; Alders, M.; Sylva, M. et al

in Journal of medical genetics (2013)

BACKGROUND: The T gene (brachyury gene) is the founding member of the T-box family of transcription factors and is vital for the formation and differentiation of the mesoderm and the axial development of ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The T gene (brachyury gene) is the founding member of the T-box family of transcription factors and is vital for the formation and differentiation of the mesoderm and the axial development of all vertebrates. RESULTS: We report here on four patients from three consanguineous families exhibiting sacral agenesis, a persistent notochordal canal and abnormal ossification of the vertebral bodies, and the identification and characterisation of their underlying genetic defect. Given the consanguineous nature and the similarity of the phenotypes between the three families, we performed homozygosity mapping and identified a common 4.1 Mb homozygous region on chromosome 6q27, containing T, brachyury homologue (mouse) or T. Sequencing of T in the affected individuals led to the identification of a homozygous missense mutation, p.H171R, in the highly conserved T-box. The homozygous mutation results in diminished DNA binding, increased cell growth, and interferes with the normal expression of genes involved in ossification, notochord maintenance and axial mesoderm development. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified a shared homozygous mutation in three families in T and linked it to a novel syndrome consisting of sacral agenesis, a persistent notochordal canal and abnormal ossification of the vertebral bodies. We suggest that screening for the ossification of the vertebrae is warranted in patients with sacral agenesis to evaluate the possible causal involvement of T. [less ▲]

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See detailMutations in the voltage-gated potassium channel gene KCNH1 cause Temple-Baraitser syndrome and epilepsy.
Simons, Cas; Rash, Lachlan D.; Crawford, Joanna et al

in Nature genetics (2015), 47(1), 73-7

Temple-Baraitser syndrome (TBS) is a multisystem developmental disorder characterized by intellectual disability, epilepsy, and hypoplasia or aplasia of the nails of the thumb and great toe. Here we ... [more ▼]

Temple-Baraitser syndrome (TBS) is a multisystem developmental disorder characterized by intellectual disability, epilepsy, and hypoplasia or aplasia of the nails of the thumb and great toe. Here we report damaging de novo mutations in KCNH1 (encoding a protein called ether a go-go, EAG1 or KV10.1), a voltage-gated potassium channel that is predominantly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), in six individuals with TBS. Characterization of the mutant channels in both Xenopus laevis oocytes and human HEK293T cells showed a decreased threshold of activation and delayed deactivation, demonstrating that TBS-associated KCNH1 mutations lead to deleterious gain of function. Consistent with this result, we find that two mothers of children with TBS, who have epilepsy but are otherwise healthy, are low-level (10% and 27%) mosaic carriers of pathogenic KCNH1 mutations. Consistent with recent reports, this finding demonstrates that the etiology of many unresolved CNS disorders, including epilepsies, might be explained by pathogenic mosaic mutations. [less ▲]

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See detailMutations in type 1 procollagen that cause osteogenesis imperfecta: effects of the mutations on the assembly of collagen into fibrils, the basis of phenotypic variations, and potential antisense therapies.
Prockop, D. J.; Colige, Alain ULg; Helminen, H. et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (1993), 8 Suppl 2

Work by a large number of investigators over the last decade has established that over 90% of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta have mutations in one of the two genes for type I procollagen, that most ... [more ▼]

Work by a large number of investigators over the last decade has established that over 90% of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta have mutations in one of the two genes for type I procollagen, that most unrelated probands have different mutations in the genes, and that the mutations found in most of the serious variants of the disease cause synthesis of abnormal pro alpha chains of the protein. The results have demonstrated that synthesis of structurally abnormal but partially functional pro alpha chains can interfere with folding of the central region of the protein into a triple-helical conformation, prevent processing of the N-terminal propeptides of procollagen, or produce subtle alterations in conformation that interfere with the self-assembly of the protein into collagen fibrils. One of the unsolved mysteries about the disease is why some mutations produce severe phenotypes, whereas very similar mutations produce mild phenotypes. Recent studies in transgenic mice suggest that nongenetic factors, such as stochastic events during development, may determine the severity of the disease phenotype produced by a specific mutation. Also, recent results raised the possibility that strategies of antisense gene therapy may be effective in treating the disease some time in the future. Specific inhibition of expression of a mutated collagen gene has been obtained with antisense oligonucleotides in cell culture experiments. However, there is no means of selective delivery of antisense oligonucleotides to the appropriate tissues. [less ▲]

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See detailMutations Inactivating Mitochondrial Genes in Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii
Remacle, Claire ULg; Duby, Franceline ULg; Cardol, Pierre ULg et al

in Biochemical Society Transactions (2001), 29(Pt 4), 442-6

Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is now becoming a useful model for the study of mitochondrial genetics in a photosynthetic organism. The small (15.8 kb) mitochondrial genome C. reinhardtii has been sequenced ... [more ▼]

Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is now becoming a useful model for the study of mitochondrial genetics in a photosynthetic organism. The small (15.8 kb) mitochondrial genome C. reinhardtii has been sequenced completely and all the genes have been identified. Several mutants inactivated in mitochondrial genes encoding components of the respiratory complexes I, III and IV have been characterized at the molecular level. Assembly of complex I in several mutant strains and mapping of mitochondrial mutations by recombinational analysis are also described. [less ▲]

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See detailMutations near amino end of alpha 1(I) collagen cause combined osteogenesis imperfecta/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome by interference with N-propeptide processing
Cabral, Wayne A.; Makareeva, Elena; Colige, Alain ULg et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2005), 280(19), 19259-19269

Patients with OI/EDS form a distinct subset of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) patients. In addition to skeletal fragility, they have characteristics of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). We identified 7 children ... [more ▼]

Patients with OI/EDS form a distinct subset of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) patients. In addition to skeletal fragility, they have characteristics of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). We identified 7 children with types III or IV OI, plus severe large and small joint laxity and early progressive scoliosis. In each child with OI/EDS, we identified a mutation in the first 90 residues of the helical region of α 1(I) collagen. These mutations prevent or delay removal of the procollagen N-propeptide by purified N-proteinase (ADAMTS-2) in vitro and in pericellular assays. The mutant pN-collagen which results is efficiently incorporated into matrix by cultured fibroblasts and osteoblasts and is prominently present in newly incorporated and immaturely cross-linked collagen. Dermal collagen fibrils have significantly reduced cross-sectional diameters, corroborating incorporation of pN-collagen into fibrils in vivo. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed that these mutant collagens are less stable than the corresponding procollagens, which is not seen with other type I collagen helical mutations. These mutations disrupt a distinct folding region of high thermal stability in the first 90 residues at the amino end of type I collagen and alter the secondary structure of the adjacent N-proteinase cleavage site. Thus, these OI/EDS collagen mutations are directly responsible for the bone fragility of OI and indirectly responsible for EDS symptoms, by interference with N-propeptide removal. [less ▲]

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