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See detailMolecular cloning and functional expression of a new aphid isoprenyl diphosphate synthase
Vandermoten, Sophie ULg; Beliveau, C.; Sen, S. et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie et de Biochimie (2006, December), 190

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (11 ULg)
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See detailMolecular Cloning of a Mutated Hoxb7 Cdna Encoding a Truncated Transactivating Homeodomain-Containing Protein
Chariot, Alain ULg; Senterre-Lesenfants, Sylviane; Sobel, Mark E et al

in Journal of Cellular Biochemistry (1998), 71(1), 46-54

Homeodomain-containing proteins regulate, as transcription factors, the coordinated expression of genes involved in development, differentiation, and malignant transformation. We report here the molecular ... [more ▼]

Homeodomain-containing proteins regulate, as transcription factors, the coordinated expression of genes involved in development, differentiation, and malignant transformation. We report here the molecular cloning of a mutated HOXB7 transcript encoding a truncated homeodomain-containing protein in MCF7 cells. This is a new example of mutation affecting the coding region of a HOX gene. In addition, we detected two HOXB7 transcripts in several breast cell lines and demonstrated that both normal and mutated alleles were expressed at the RNA level in MCF7 cells as well as in a variety of breast tissues and lymphocytes, suggesting that a truncated HOXB7 protein might be expressed in vivo. Using transient co-transfection experiments, we demonstrated that both HOXB7 proteins can activate transcription from a consensus HOX binding sequence in breast cancer cells. Our results provide evidence that HOXB7 protein has transcription factor activity in vivo and that the two last amino acids do not contribute to this property. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular cloning of bovine viral diarrhea viral sequences
Renard, A.; Guiot, C.; Schmetz, D. et al

in DNA (1985), 4(6), 429-38

Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) genomic RNA was identified as a 12.5-kb single-stranded RNA molecule in both infected bovine embryonic kidney cells (BEK-1) and partially purified virions. BVD virion ... [more ▼]

Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) genomic RNA was identified as a 12.5-kb single-stranded RNA molecule in both infected bovine embryonic kidney cells (BEK-1) and partially purified virions. BVD virion RNA was partially purified and used as a template for cDNA synthesis. BVDV-specific cDNA sequences were molecularly cloned and shown to hybridize to infected cell RNA but not to uninfected cell RNA or DNA. A single RNA species of 12.5 kb, representing the viral RNA genome, was detected in infected cells. A preliminary map of the BVDV specific cDNA clones was constructed and five major, nonoverlapping families were observed, accounting for approximately one-half of the viral genome. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular cloning of DNA complementary to bovine growth hormone mRNA
Miller, Walter L; Martial, Joseph ULg; Baxter, John D

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (1980), 255(16), 7521-4

We have cloned DNA complementary to mRNA coding for bovine growth hormone (bGH). Double-stranded DNA complementary to bovine pituitary mRNA was inserted into the Pst I site of plasmid pBR322 by the dC x ... [more ▼]

We have cloned DNA complementary to mRNA coding for bovine growth hormone (bGH). Double-stranded DNA complementary to bovine pituitary mRNA was inserted into the Pst I site of plasmid pBR322 by the dC x dG tailing technique and amplified in E. coli x 1776. A recombinant plasmid containing bGH cDNA ws identified by hybridization to cloned rat growth hormone cDNA. It contains the entire coding and 3'-untranslated regions and 31 bases in the 5'-untranslated region. Nucleotide sequence analysis determined the sequence of the 26-amino acid signal peptide and confirmed the published amino acid sequence of the secreted hormone at all but 2 residues. Codon usage is nonrandom, with 81.7% of the codons ending in G or C. The nucleotide sequence of bGH mRNA is 83.9% homologous with rat GH mRNA and 76.5% homologous with human GH mRNA, while the respective amino acid sequence homologies are 83.5% and 66.8%. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular cloning of the bovine viral diarrhea virus genomic RNA
Renard, A.; Schmetz, D.; Guiot, C. et al

in Annales de Recherches Vétérinaires = Annals of Veterinary Research (1987), 18(2), 121-5

The genomic RNA from Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVD) was cloned in E. coli. The complete sequence has been obtained and the genomic organization has been deduced. Some of the BVD specific cDNA have been ... [more ▼]

The genomic RNA from Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVD) was cloned in E. coli. The complete sequence has been obtained and the genomic organization has been deduced. Some of the BVD specific cDNA have been expressed in bacteria, eucaryotic cells and in vitro. We suggest that BVDV belongs to a new family different from Togaviridae and Flaviviridae. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular cloning of varicella-zoster virus DNA and its detection in situ in infected nerve cells
Merville, Marie-Paule ULg; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg; Delrée, P. et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie et de Biochimie (1987), 95(2), 31

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See detailMolecular cloning, sequencing and expression of BVDV RNA
Renard, A.; Brown-Shimmer, S.; Schmetz, D. et al

Conference (1987)

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See detailMolecular conformation and electronic properties of protoporphyrin-IX self-assembled monolayers adsorbed on a Pt(111) surface
Humbert, C.; Volcke, C.; Sartenaer, Y. et al

in Surface Science (2006), 600

Monolayers of protoporphyrin-IX molecules are prepared on a Pt(111) surface by a self-assembly process in order to manufacture organic devices with controlled electronic properties. Scanning tunnelling ... [more ▼]

Monolayers of protoporphyrin-IX molecules are prepared on a Pt(111) surface by a self-assembly process in order to manufacture organic devices with controlled electronic properties. Scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and two-colour sum-frequency generation (2C-SFG) are performed ex situ in ambient air, in order to characterize their molecular conformation and electronic properties at the monolayer level, respectively. STM measurements performed with functionalized gold tips reveal a high covering rate of the metal surface. 2C-SFG measurements highlight CH stretching modes of vinyl substituted groups (R-CH=CH2) in the 2800–3200 cm-1 infrared spectral range and particular electronic features in the visible spectral range, i.e. a Soret band red shift and band separation compared to the liquid phase. Moreover, similar measurements are performed on Zn(II)Protoporphyrin-IX and 5-[p-(6-mercaptohexoxy)-phenyl]-10,15,20-triphenylporphin films for comparison. These results suggest a film conformation with the molecules having different tilt angles with respect to the substrate normal, depending on the ion metal presence or the chain length bonded to the porphyrin moiety. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular conformation and electronic properties of protoporphyrin-IX self-assembled monolayers adsorbed on Pt(111) surface
Humbert, Christophe; Volcke, Cédric; Sartenaer, Yannick et al

Poster (2005, September)

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See detailMolecular Construction: Pushing, Moving, Stretching, and Connecting Individual Molecules
Bano, Fouzia; Duwez, Anne-Sophie ULg

in Duwez, Anne-Sophie; Willet, Nicolas (Eds.) Molecular manipulation with atomic force microscopy (2012)

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See detailMolecular cranes swing into action
Duwez, Anne-Sophie ULg

in Nature Nanotechnology (2008), 3

Atomic force microscopes have exploited the properties of DNA to ‘cut-and-paste’ molecules on surfaces with an accuracy of 10 nm

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See detailMolecular cytogenetic study of 126 unselected T-ALL cases reveals high incidence of TCR beta locus rearrangements and putative new T-cell oncogenes
Cauwelier, B.; Dastugue, N.; Cools, J. et al

in Leukemia (2006), 20(7), 1238-1244

Chromosomal aberrations of T-cell receptor (TCR) gene loci often involve the TCR alpha delta (14q11) locus and affect various known T-cell oncogenes. A systematic fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH ... [more ▼]

Chromosomal aberrations of T-cell receptor (TCR) gene loci often involve the TCR alpha delta (14q11) locus and affect various known T-cell oncogenes. A systematic fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) screening for the detection of chromosomal aberrations involving the TCR loci, TCRad (14q11), TCR beta (7q34) and TCR gamma (7p14), has not been conducted so far. Therefore, we initiated a screening of 126 T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma cases and 19 T-ALL cell lines using FISH break-apart assays for the different TCR loci. Genomic rearrangements of the TCR beta locus were detected in 24/ 126 cases (19%), most of which (58.3%) were not detected upon banding analysis. Breakpoints in the TCR alpha delta locus were detected in 22/ 126 cases (17.4%), whereas standard cytogenetics only detected 14 of these 22 cases. Cryptic TCR alpha delta/ TCR beta chromosome aberrations were thus observed in 22 of 126 cases (17.4%). Some of these chromosome aberrations target new putative T-cell oncogenes at chromosome 11q24, 20p12 and 6q22. Five patients and one cell line carried chromosomal rearrangements affecting both TCR beta and TCR alpha delta loci. In conclusion, this study presents the first inventory of chromosomal rearrangements of TCR loci in T-ALL, revealing an unexpected high number of cryptic chromosomal rearrangements of the TCR beta locus and further broadening the spectrum of genes putatively implicated in T-cell oncogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular data challenge traditional subgeneric divisions in the leafy liverwort Radula
Devos, Nicolas; Renner, MAM; Gradstein, SR et al

in Taxon (2011), 60

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See detailMolecular decision trees realized by ultrafast electronic spectroscopy
Fresch, Barbara ULg; Hiluf, Dawit; Collini, Elisabetta et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2013), 110(43), 17183-17188

The outcome of a light–matter interaction depends on both the state of matter and the state of light. It is thus a natural setting for implementing bilinear classical logic. A description of the state of ... [more ▼]

The outcome of a light–matter interaction depends on both the state of matter and the state of light. It is thus a natural setting for implementing bilinear classical logic. A description of the state of a time-varying system requires measuring an (ideally complete) set of time-dependent observables. Typically, this is prohibitive, but in weak-field spectroscopy we can move toward this goal because only a finite number of levels are accessible. Recent progress in nonlinear spectroscopies means that nontrivial measurements can be implemented and thereby give rise to interesting logic schemes where the outputs are functions of the observables. Lie algebra offers a natural tool for generating the outcome of the bilinear light–matter interaction. We show how to synthesize these ideas by explicitly discussing three-photon spectroscopy of a bichromophoric molecule for which there are four accessible states. Switching logic would use the on–off occupancies of these four states as outcomes. Here, we explore the use of all 16 observables that define the time-evolving state of the bichromophoric system. The bilinear laser–system interaction with the three pulses of the setup of a 2D photon echo spectroscopy experiment can be used to generate a rich parallel logic that corresponds to the implementation of a molecular decision tree. Our simulations allow relaxation by weak coupling to the environment, which adds to the complexity of the logic operations. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular Definition of an Allelic Series of Mutations Disrupting the Myostatin Function and Causing Double-Muscling in Cattle
Grobet, Luc ULg; Poncelet, D.; Royo, L. J. et al

in Mammalian Genome : Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society (1998), 9(3), 210-3

We have determined the entire myostatin coding sequence for 32 double-muscled cattle sampled from ten European cattle breeds. Seven DNA sequence polymorphisms were identified, of which five would be ... [more ▼]

We have determined the entire myostatin coding sequence for 32 double-muscled cattle sampled from ten European cattle breeds. Seven DNA sequence polymorphisms were identified, of which five would be predicted to disrupt the function of the protein, one is a conservative amino acid substitution, and one a silent DNA sequence variant. Four additional DNA sequence polymorphisms were identified in myostatin intronic sequences. In all but two breeds, all double-muscled animals were either homozygous or compound heterozygotes for one of the five loss-of-function mutations. The absence of obvious loss-of-function mutations in the coding sequence of the two remaining breeds points either towards additional mutations in unexplored segments of the gene, or towards locus heterogeneity of double-muscling. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular dermatopathology in malignant melanoma.
REGINSTER, Marie-Annick ULg; PIERARD-FRANCHIMONT, Claudine ULg; PIERARD, Gérald ULg et al

in Dermatology Research and Practice (2012), 2012(684032), 1-6

At present, immunohistochemistry is taken for granted in the establishment of malignant melanoma (MM) diagnosis. In recent years, molecular diagnosis in dermatopathology has benefited from a vast array of ... [more ▼]

At present, immunohistochemistry is taken for granted in the establishment of malignant melanoma (MM) diagnosis. In recent years, molecular diagnosis in dermatopathology has benefited from a vast array of advances in the fields of genomics and proteomics. Sensitive techniques are available for detecting specific DNA and RNA sequences by molecular hybridization. This paper intends to update methods of molecular cytogenetics available as diagnostic adjuncts in the field of MM. Cytogenetics has highlighted the pathogenesis of atypical melanocytic neoplasms with emphasis on the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway during the initiation step of the neoplasms. 20 to 40% of MM families have mutations in the tumour suppressor gene p16 or CDKN2A. In addition, somatic mutations in p16, p53, BRAF, and cKIT are present in MM. Genome-wide scan analyses on MM indicate positive associations for genes involved in melanocytic naevi, but MM is likely caused by a variety of common low-penetrance genes. Molecular dermatopathology is expanding, and its use in the assessment of melanocytic neoplasms appears to be promising in the fields of research and diagnosis. Molecular dermatopathology will probably make its way to an increased number of diagnostic laboratories. The expected benefit should improve the patient management. This evolution points to a need for evolution in the training requirements and role of dermatopathologists. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular description of the interactions of aminoglycoside antibiotics with negatively-charged phospholipids. Theoretical molecular modelling and experimental results.
Mingeot-Leclercq, M. P.; Schanck, A.; Van Bambeke, F. et al

in Pharmacology (1995), 14

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (0 ULg)
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See detailMolecular design of multicomponent polymer systems XIX : stability of cocontinuous phase morphologies in low-density polyethylene-polystyrene blends emulsified by block copolymers
Harrats, Charef; Blacher, Silvia ULg; Fayt, Roger et al

in Journal of Polymer Science. Part B, Polymer Physics (1995), 33(5), 801-811

Polyethylene-polystyrene blends containing small amounts of polyethylene (20 wt %) display a cocontinuous phase morphology that is very unstable in the absence of an emulsifier. The kinetics of ... [more ▼]

Polyethylene-polystyrene blends containing small amounts of polyethylene (20 wt %) display a cocontinuous phase morphology that is very unstable in the absence of an emulsifier. The kinetics of coalescence at high temperature is therefore very sensitive to differences in the interfacial activity of added polymeric emulsifiers. The morphology of blends added with a pure or a tapered hydrogenated polybutadiene-b-polystyrene block copolymer is investigated as a function of annealing time at 180°C. Various image treatments (standard granulometry, opening size granulometry distribution, and multiscaling analysis) were used to quantify the morphological evolution of these blends. The results clearly demonstrate that the tapered block copolymer is definitely more efficient than the corresponding pure diblock for stabilizing the cocontinuous structure of these blends. The differential behavior is assumed to results from differences in the tendency of the two copolymers to segregate and form their own domains. © 1995 John Wiley [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular Detection and Genotyping of Noroviruses
Stals, A.; Mathijs, E.; Baert, L. et al

in Food and Environmental Virology (2012), 4(4), 153-167

Noroviruses (NoVs) are a major cause of gastroenteritis worldwide in humans and animals and are known as very infectious viral agents. They are spread through feces and vomit via several transmission ... [more ▼]

Noroviruses (NoVs) are a major cause of gastroenteritis worldwide in humans and animals and are known as very infectious viral agents. They are spread through feces and vomit via several transmission routes involving person-to-person contact, food, and water. Investigation of these transmission routes requires sensitive methods for detection of NoVs. As NoVs cannot be cultivated to date, detection of these viruses relies on the use of molecular methods such as (real-time) reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Regardless of the matrix, detection of NoVs generally requires three subsequent steps: a virus extraction step, RNA purification, and molecular detection of the purified RNA, occasionally followed by molecular genotyping. The current review mainly focused on the molecular detection and genotyping of NoVs. The most conserved region in the genome of human infective NoVs is the ORF1/ORF2 junction and has been used as a preferred target region for molecular detection of NoVs by methods such as (real-time) RT-PCR, NASBA, and LAMP. In case of animal NoVs, broad range molecular assays have most frequently been applied for molecular detection. Regarding genotyping of NoVs, five regions situated in the polymerase and capsid genes have been used for conventional RT-PCR amplification and sequencing. As the expected levels of NoVs on food and in water are very low and inhibition of molecular methods can occur in these matrices, quality control including adequate positive and negative controls is an essential part of NoV detection. Although the development of molecular methods for NoV detection has certainly aided in the understanding of NoV transmission, it has also led to new problems such as the question whether low levels of human NoV detected on fresh produce and shellfish could pose a threat to public health. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media New York. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (5 ULg)