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See detailIntranasal infusion of enilconazole for treatment of sinonasal aspergillosis in dogs.
Zonderland, Jean-Luc; Stork, Christoph; Saunders, Jimmy et al

in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association [=JAVMA] (2002), 221

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See detailIntranasal oxytocin in obsessive-compulsive disorder
Ansseau, Marc ULg; Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg; Mormont, Christian ULg et al

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (1987), 12

A 55 years patient with obsessive-compulsive disorder showed clear improvement during four weeks of treatment with intranasal oxytocin compared to four weeks of intranasal placebo. This improvement was ... [more ▼]

A 55 years patient with obsessive-compulsive disorder showed clear improvement during four weeks of treatment with intranasal oxytocin compared to four weeks of intranasal placebo. This improvement was concurrent with the development of severe memory disturbances, supporting the amnestic properties of the peptide. However, the patient also developped psychotic symptoms and a marked decrease in plasma sodium and osmolality, which may have masked the obsessive symptomatology. The case highlights the need for careful monitoring in long-term oxytocin therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailIntranasal oxytocine as an adjunct to escitalopram in major depression.
Scantamburlo, Gabrielle ULg; Ansseau, Marc ULg; Geenen, Vincent ULg et al

in Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences (The) (2011), 23(2), 5

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (22 ULg)
See detailIntransigeantisme, intégralisme et réformisme social. Structure et longue durée dans l'histoire du catholicisme contemporain (XIXe - XXe s.): réflexions historiographiques et méthodologiques
Jadoulle, Jean-Louis ULg

in G. BRAIVE et J.-M. CAUCHIES (Ed.) La critique historique à l'épreuve. Liber discipulorum Jacques Paquet (1989)

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See detailIntranuclear Cascade - Percolation Approach for Protons and Light Fragments Production in Neon-Niobium Reactions at 400 and 800 MeV per Nucleon
Cugnon, Joseph ULg; Montarou, G.; Marroncle, J. et al

in Physical Review. C : Nuclear Physics (1993), 47

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See detailThe Intranuclear Cascade and the Collision Dynamics
Cugnon, Joseph ULg; L'Hôte, Denis

in Csernaï, L. P.; Strottmann, D. D. (Eds.) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions (1991)

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See detailThe Intranuclear Cascade for Heavy Ion Relativistic Collisions
Cugnon, Joseph ULg; Vandermeulen, Jacques

in Dietrich, Klaus; di Toro, M.; Mang, H. J. (Eds.) Winter College on Fundamental Nuclear Physics, vol. 3, (World Scientific, Singapore, 1985), pp. 1373-1418 (1985)

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See detailIntranuclear Cascade Model for a Comprehensive Description of Spallation Reaction Data
Cugnon, Joseph ULg; Boudard, Alain; Leray, Sylvie et al

in Physical Review. C : Nuclear Physics (2002), 66

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See detailIntranuclear Cascade Model. A Review
Cugnon, Joseph ULg

in Nuclear Physics A (1982), 389

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See detailIntranuclear Cascade Models at Low Energy?
Cugnon, Joseph ULg; Yariv, Yair; Aoust, Thierry et al

in Bersillon, O. (Ed.) Proceedings of the International Conference on Nuclear Data for Science and TechnologPy (2008)

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See detailIntranuclear Cascade Models Lack Dynamic Flow
Cugnon, Joseph ULg; L'Hôte, Denis; Molitoris, J.-J. et al

in Physical Review. C : Nuclear Physics (1986), 33

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See detailIntranuclear Cascade News
Cugnon, Joseph ULg; L'Hôte, Denis

in Bock, R.; Gutbrod, H. H.; Stock, R. (Eds.) 7th High Energy Heavy Ion Study, (GSI-85-10 Report, Darmstadt, 1985) (1985)

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See detailIntraocular Lens Adsorbome: a Proteomic Study of Adsorbed Proteins onto Acrylic Materials and Its Implication in Secondary Cataract
Huang, Yi-Shiang ULg; Bertrand, Virginie ULg; Mazzucchelli, Gabriel ULg et al

Poster (2012, September 17)

The intraocular lens (IOL) is a polymer implant designed to replace the natural lens after cataract surgery. When the implant is introduced into the lens capsule, the polymer starts to interact with the ... [more ▼]

The intraocular lens (IOL) is a polymer implant designed to replace the natural lens after cataract surgery. When the implant is introduced into the lens capsule, the polymer starts to interact with the aqueous humour and the exchange of molecules between the solid and the liquid begins. The nature of exchange in water, ions, and biomolecules may result in several postoperative complications including glistening, calcification, and posterior capsular opacification. The posterior capsular opacification (PCO, also called “Secondary Cataract”) is raised from the over-growth of residual lens epithelial cells. The first step of the over-growth process of the cells is their adhesion to the deposited biomolecules, such as proteins involved in extra-cellular matrices. The purpose of this study is to identify the principal proteins adsorbed onto the acrylic polymers by mass spectrometry. The concept of adsorbome is to generate a list of adsorbed proteins to the hydrophilic and hydrophobic polymers, and then compare the difference to the original component of aqueous humour in order to see the affinity of individual protein to each material. Two kinds of hydrophilic and two kinds of hydrophobic acrylic polymers were tested for their adsorbomes by treating them with an aqueous humour analogue and the major adsorbed proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. Interestingly, the hydrophilic acrylic polymer shows a relative lower protein adsorption rate but shows a higher incidence of secondary cataract. This phenomenon implies the adsorbed proteins play a crucial role in progress of secondary cataract. [less ▲]

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See detailIntraocular lenses with functionalized surfaces by biomolecules in relation with lens epithelial cell adhesion
Huang, Yi-Shiang ULg

Doctoral thesis (2014)

Posterior Capsular Opacification (PCO) is the capsule fibrosis developed onto the implanted IntraOcular Lens (IOL) by the de-differentiation of Lens Epithelial Cells (LEC) undergoing Epithelial ... [more ▼]

Posterior Capsular Opacification (PCO) is the capsule fibrosis developed onto the implanted IntraOcular Lens (IOL) by the de-differentiation of Lens Epithelial Cells (LEC) undergoing Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT). Literature has shown that the incidence of PCO is multifactorial including patient’s age or disease, surgical technique, and IOL design and material. Reports comparing hydrophilic and hydrophobic acrylic IOLs show the former has more severe PCO after EMT transition. Additionally, the LEC adhesion is favored onto the hydrophobic materials compared to the hydrophilic ones. A biomimetic strategy to promote LEC adhesion without de-differentiation to reduce PCO development risk is proposed. RGD peptides, as well as their grafting and quantification methods on a hydrophilic acrylic polymer were investigated. The surface functionalized IOL promoting LEC adhesion via integrin receptors can be used to reconstitute the capsule-LEC-IOL sandwich structure, which is considered to prevent PCO formation in literature. The results show the innovative biomaterial improves LEC adhesion, and also exhibits similar optical (light transmittance, optical bench) and mechanical (haptic compression force, IOL injection force) properties comparing to the starting material. In addition, comparing to the hydrophobic IOL material, this bioactive biomaterial exhibits similar abilities in LEC adhesion, morphology maintenance, and EMT biomarker expression. The in vitro assays suggest this biomaterial has the potential to reduce some risk factors of PCO development. [less ▲]

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See detailIntraocular lenses with functionalized surfaces by biomolecules in relation with lens epithelial cell adhesion
Huang, Yi-Shiang ULg; Alexandre, Michaël ULg; Bozukova, Dimitriya et al

Poster (2013, April 25)

A cataract is pathology opacity of the lens or capsule of the eye, causing impairment of vision or even blindness. Surgery, with lens extraction and intraocular lens implantation, is still the only ... [more ▼]

A cataract is pathology opacity of the lens or capsule of the eye, causing impairment of vision or even blindness. Surgery, with lens extraction and intraocular lens implantation, is still the only currently available treatment. The most common complication after implantation of intraocular lenses (IOLs) is the posterior capsular opacification (PCO) or secondary cataract. This is the result of lens epithelial cells (LECs) proliferation and their transition to mesenchymal cells. In 1997, a Sandwich theory was proposed to elucidate the developmental process of PCO. [1] According to this model, an IOL with higher affinity to LECs will induce a less PCO. In our research, the pHEMA (Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)) based acrylic hydrophilic polymer is subjected to the surface modification by conjugating with the bioactive peptides. The RGD sequence, known for its excellent biocompatibility, is designed to stimulate the biointegration between the LECs and the polymer implant. [2]. From our research, The RGD peptide immobilized onto pHEMA surfaces significantly facilitates the adhesion of the porcine LEC. The peptide immobilized surface retains its biological function even after 10 times of autoclave. On the other hand, the immobilized peptide does not alter the hydrophobicity of the surface, the light transmission, as well as the cytotoxicity of the material. This functionalized biomaterial would possibly prevent the formation of PCO. [1] J Cataract Refract Surg. 1997 Dec;23(10):1539-42 [2] Trends Biotechnol. 2008 Jul;26(7):382-92 [less ▲]

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See detailIntraocular Lenses with Functionalized Surfaces by Biomolecules in Relation with Lens Epithelial Cell Adhesion
Huang, Yi-Shiang ULg

Conference (2012, March 27)

A cataract is pathology opacity of the lens or capsule of the eye, causing impairment of vision or even blindness. In 1998, it was estimated that worldwide 19.4 million people were bilaterally blind from ... [more ▼]

A cataract is pathology opacity of the lens or capsule of the eye, causing impairment of vision or even blindness. In 1998, it was estimated that worldwide 19.4 million people were bilaterally blind from age-related cataract. Surgery, with lens extraction and intraocular lens implantation, is still the only currently available treatment. More than 1.3 million cataract operations were performed in the USA in 1998 at a cost of $3.5 billion. The most common complication after implantation of intraocular lenses (IOLs) is the posterior capsular opacification (PCO) or secondary cataract. This is the result of lens epithelial cells (LECs) proliferation and their transition to mesenchymal cells. In 1997, a Sandwich theory was proposed to elucidate the developmental process of PCO. According to this model, an IOL with higher affinity to LECs will induce a less PCO. In our research, the pHEMA (Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)) based acrylic hydrophilic polymer is subjected to the surface modification by conjugating with the bioactive peptides. The RGD sequence, known for its excellent biocompatibility, is designed to stimulate the biointegration between the LECs and the polymer implant. Our research program will focus on the evaluation of the physical, mechanical and biological properties of the lens before and after peptide grafting. These diverse tests include contact angle measurements, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), FTIR/ATR, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and the MTS cytotoxicity assay. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (14 ULg)