Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Peer Reviewed
See detailMoisture profiles determination during convective drying using X-ray microtomography
Léonard, Angélique ULg; Blacher, Silvia ULg; Marchot, Pierre ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 3rd World Congress on Industrial Process Tomography, Banff, Canada (2003, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMolding thrombus of an ECMO cannula floating in the right atrium.
MORIMONT, Philippe ULg; LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULg; GARSPARD, Valérie ULg et al

in Intensive Care Medicine (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailLe Mole National Park (Ghana). Une expérience réussie d’écotourisme pédestre
Vermeulen, Cédric ULg; Portier, B.

in Parcs & Réserves (2003), 58(1), 3-6

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMolecular adaptations in mouse skeletal muscle following eccentrically versus concentrically biased training
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Lacrosse, Zoé ULg; Simonet, Arnaud et al

Poster (2014, July 02)

Introduction The molecular adaptations specifically induced by different muscle contraction types have only been partially elucidated. We previously demonstrated that eccentric contractions in human ... [more ▼]

Introduction The molecular adaptations specifically induced by different muscle contraction types have only been partially elucidated. We previously demonstrated that eccentric contractions in human quadriceps elicited proteome modifications that suggest a muscle fiber typology adaptation (Hody et al. 2011). We address this question in a more systematic way by examining the effects of different running modes on the mouse muscle proteome and the muscle fiber typology on the whole quadriceps. Methods Male adult mice (C57BL6) were randomly divided into downhill running (DHR, quadricipital eccentrically biased contractions), uphill running (UHR, quadricipital concentrically biased contractions) and untrained control (CONT) groups. Running groups performed five training sessions on an inclined treadmill for 75 to 135 min/day and the quadriceps muscles were dissected 96 hours after the last session. Muscle protein extracts of DHR and UHR groups (n=4/group) were subjected to a 2D-DIGE analysis coupled with mass spectrometry. The assessment of fiber type, size and number was performed on the rectus femoris of the three groups (n=6/group) using myosin heavy chain (MHC) immunofluorescence. Results In the proteomic analysis, eight spots identified as the fast MHC isoforms exhibited a lower abundance in DHR compared to UHR (p<0.05, t-test). In contrast, ATP synthase subunit a and tubulin ß were more expressed in DHR (p<0.05). Immunohistological analysis revealed a significant higher proportion of type I and IIa fibers for DHR compared to UHR or CONT groups (p<0.05, one-way ANOVA). Discussion Our data demonstrate that the eccentrically biased contractions in mice induced specific adaptations in protein expression as well as in muscle fiber type and size which may reflect a more oxidative muscle phenotype. The differences in stress placed on the muscle between both trainings may be responsible for some unique adaptations resulting from the eccentrically biased training. Eccentric training is known to protect skeletal muscles against exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) which may occur after intense eccentric contractions (Chen et al. 2010; Hody et al. 2011). It is also suggested that fast glycolytic muscle fibers are more vulnerable to EIMD than oxidative fibers (Lieber and Friden, 1988). Therefore, it would be interesting to investigate whether the molecular changes induced by an eccentrically biased training are involved in protection against EIMD. References Chen TC, Chen HL, Lin MJ, Wu CJ, Nosaka K. (2010). Med Sci Sports Exerc 42, 1004-1012. Hody S, Leprince P, Sergeant K, Renaut J, Croisier JL, Wang F, Rogister B. (2011). Med Sci Sports Exerc 43, 2281-2296. Lieber RL, Friden J. (1988). Acta Physiol Scand 133, 587-588. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (6 ULg)
See detailMolecular adaptations of alpha-amylase from psychrophilic bacteria
Feller, Georges ULg; LIBIOULLE, Cécile ULg; Payan, Françoise et al

Poster (1995)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailMolecular adaptations of alpha-amylase from psychrophilic bacteria
Feller, Georges ULg; LIBIOULLE, Cécile ULg; Payan, Françoise et al

Poster (1994)

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailMolecular adaptations of alpha-amylase from psychrophilic bacteria
Feller, Georges ULg; LIBIOULLE, Cécile ULg; Payan, Françoise et al

Poster (1994)

Detailed reference viewed: 2 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailMolecular adaptations of alpha-amylase from psychrophilic bacteria.
Feller, Georges ULg; LIBIOULLE, Cécile ULg; Payan, Françoise et al

Poster (1994)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)
See detailMolecular adaptations of cold enzymes
Feller, Georges ULg

Conference (1998)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailMolecular adaptations of enzymes from psychrophilic bacteria
Feller, Georges ULg

Conference (1995)

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMolecular adaptations of enzymes from psychrophilic organisms
Feller, Georges ULg; Arpigny, J. L.; Narinx, E. et al

in Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. A : Comparative Physiology (1997), 118(3), 495-499

The dominating adaptative character of enzymes from cold-evolving organisms is their high turnover number (k(cat)) and catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K-m), which compensate for the reduction of chemical ... [more ▼]

The dominating adaptative character of enzymes from cold-evolving organisms is their high turnover number (k(cat)) and catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K-m), which compensate for the reduction of chemical reaction rates inherent to low temperatures. This optimization of the catalytic parameters can originate from the highly flexible structure of these proteins providing enhanced abilities to undergo conformational changes during catalysis at low temperatures. Molecular modelling of the 3-D structure of cold-adapted enzymes reveals that only subtle modifications of their conformation can be related to the structural flexibility. The observed structural features include: 1) the reduction of the number of weak interactions involved in the folded state stability like salt bridges, weakly polar interactions between aromatic side chains, hydrogen bonding, arginine content and charge-dipole interactions in alpha-helices; 2) a lower hydrophobicity of the hydrophobic clusters forming the core of the protein; 3) deletion or substitution of proline residues in loops or turns connecting secondary structures; 4) improved solvent interactions with a hydrophilic surface via additional charged side chains; 5) the occurence of glycine clusters close to functional domains; and 6) a looser coordination of Ca2+ ions. No general rule from the molecular changes observed; rather, each enzyme adopts its own strategy by using one or a combination of these altered interactions. Enzymes from thermophiles reinforce the same type of interactions indicating that there is a continuity in the strategy of protein adaptation to temperature. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Inc. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (2 ULg)
See detailMolecular adaptations of enzymes from thermophilic and psychrophilic organisms
Arpigny, J. L.; Feller, Georges ULg; Davail, S. et al

in Giles, R. (Ed.) Advances in Comparative and Environmental Physiology Vol. 20 (1994)

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMolecular adaptations to cold in psychrophilic enzymes
Feller, Georges ULg

in Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences : CMLS (2003), 60(4), 648-662

Psychrophiles or cold-loving organisms successfully colonize cold environments of the Earth's biosphere. To cope with the reduction of chemical reaction rates induced by low temperatures, these organisms ... [more ▼]

Psychrophiles or cold-loving organisms successfully colonize cold environments of the Earth's biosphere. To cope with the reduction of chemical reaction rates induced by low temperatures, these organisms synthesize enzymes characterized by a high catalytic activity at low temperatures associated, however, with low thermal stability. Thanks to recent advances provided by Xray crystallography, protein engineering and biophysical studies, we are beginning to understand the molecular adaptations responsible for these properties which appear to be relatively diverse. The emerging picture suggests that psychrophilic enzymes utilize an improved flexibility of the structures involved in the catalytic cycle, whereas other protein regions if not implicated in catalysis may or may not be subjected to genetic drift. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (1 ULg)
See detailMolecular alterations in breast cancers : deregulation of c-erbB2 gene expression.
Gol-Winkler, Rose; Pasleau, Françoise ULg; Grooteclaes, Madeleine et al

Conference (1993, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMolecular analysis and mating behaviour of the Trichophyton mentagrophytes species complex
Symoens, F.; Jousson, O.; Planard, C. et al

in International Journal of Medical Microbiology (2011), 301(3), 260-266

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (12 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMolecular analysis for hybrid detection between European mink (Mustela lutreola) and polecat (Mustela putorius)
Cabria, Maria Teresa; Gomez-Moliner, Benjamin; Zardoya, Rafael et al

in abstract book of the 7th Baltic Theriological conference (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMolecular Analysis in Two Siblings African Patients with Severe Form of Hunter Syndrome: Identification of a Novel (P.Y54x) Nonsense Mutation
Mutesa, Léon; Muganga, N.; Lissens, Willy et al

in Journal of Tropical Pediatrics (2007), 53(6), 434-7

Hunter syndrome (or Mucopolysaccharidosis type II, MPS II) is an X-linked recessive disorder due to the deficiency of the iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) enzyme, resulting in the accumulation of heparan and ... [more ▼]

Hunter syndrome (or Mucopolysaccharidosis type II, MPS II) is an X-linked recessive disorder due to the deficiency of the iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) enzyme, resulting in the accumulation of heparan and dermatan sulfates in the lysosomes. The heterogeneity of clinical phenotypes, ranging from mild-to-severe forms, is a result of different mutations in the IDS gene. We report here, a novel nonsense mutation (p.Y54X) in two siblings MPS II African patients affected with a severe form of the disease. We postulated that the p.Y54X mutation which causes a loss of the IDS region highly conserved among sulfatase enzymes, could be predicted as a severe disease-causing mutation for Hunter syndrome. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (2 ULg)
See detailMolecular analysis of interaction between fluorescent Pseudomonads and Pythium spp
Jacques, Philippe ULg; Mistry, Ch.; Ongena, Marc ULg et al

Poster (1992, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailMolecular analysis of miRNA expression profiles in AIP mutation positive somatotropinomas
Falk, N; Daly, Adrian ULg; Beckers, Albert ULg et al

in Endocrine Abstracts (2015, May)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailMolecular analysis of root medium impact on Arabidopsis thaliana development
Bouché, Frédéric ULg; André, Julie; Tocquin, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2013, April 18)

Hydroponics and soil are the most common media used for plant growth. Hydroponics has the main advantage of providing easy access to the root system and is therefore commonly used for gene expression ... [more ▼]

Hydroponics and soil are the most common media used for plant growth. Hydroponics has the main advantage of providing easy access to the root system and is therefore commonly used for gene expression analyses in molecular studies of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the impact of root substrate on plant growth remains poorly documented. Here we show that hydroponics accelerates both shoot growth and developmental phases as compared with culture on soil. In order to identify molecular changes in the roots that could account for these medium effects, a transcriptomic comparison was performed by microarray analysis. This experiment revealed that more than 20% of the genes were differentially expressed in hydroponics vs soil. Among them, the flowering time gene FLOWERING LOCUS C and two clades of microRNA targeted genes. To further assess the role of these genes in roots, artificial microRNAs were designed for root specific expression in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 77 (6 ULg)