Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLiver resection for noncolorectal, nonneuroendocrine metastases
Detry, Olivier ULg; Warzee, Fabian ULg; Polus, Marc ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2003), 103(5), 458-462

In noncolorectal, nonendocrine liver metastases, the role of surgery is less define than in colorectal or neuroendocrine cancer. This role is marginal as liver is not the primary site of metastases of ... [more ▼]

In noncolorectal, nonendocrine liver metastases, the role of surgery is less define than in colorectal or neuroendocrine cancer. This role is marginal as liver is not the primary site of metastases of these cancers. Less than 2 to 5% of the patients with these malignancies might be one day considered as potential candidates for liver resection, as most patients suffer from extra hepatic tumour spread at the time they develop liver involvement. However, in these few cases with liver metastases only, as no other therapeutic option may provide mid- or long-term tumour-free survival, liver resection is indicated in resectable liver metastases. Some prognostic factors have been established in the literature from the few published series : unique versus multiple hepatic metastases, unilobar vs bilobar, metachronous vs synchronous, R0 vs R1 or R2 liver resections. The type of primary tumour is also of great importance, as cutaneous melanoma, pancreatic and gastric adenocarcinoma have a very bad prognosis for liver resection of metastases, even after R0 resection. In these cases, percutaneous or laparoscopic radiofrequency ablation may find its place. In sarcoma, breast carcinoma, uveal melanoma, and genitourinary cancers, liver resection may provide satisfactory long-term results in selected cases, and is the standard of care for isolated, resectable metastasis. However, due to the scarcity of indication of liver resection for noncolorectal, nonneuroendocrine metastases, the decision should be multidisciplinary, and the patients should be informed of the advantages and pitfalls of the surgical procedure. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLiver transplant donation after cardiac death : experience at the University of Liège
Detry, Olivier ULg; Seydel, Benoît ULg; Delbouille, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2009), 41(2), 582-4

Aim: Donation after cardiac death (DCD) has been proposed to partly overcome the organ donor shortage. In liver transplantation, the additional warm ischemia linked to DCD procurement may promote higher ... [more ▼]

Aim: Donation after cardiac death (DCD) has been proposed to partly overcome the organ donor shortage. In liver transplantation, the additional warm ischemia linked to DCD procurement may promote higher rate of primary non-function and ischemic type biliary lesions. In this study we reviewed the results of DCD liver transplantation at the University of Liège. Patients and Methods: From 2003 to 2007, 13 controlled DCD liver transplantations were consecutively performed. The records of all donors and recipients were retrospectively reviewed, particularly evaluating the outcome and the occurrence of biliary complications. Mean follow-up was 25 months. Results: Mean donor age was 51 years and their mean intensive care stay was 5.4 days. Mean time between ventilation arrest and cardiac arrest was 9.3 min. Mean time between cardiac arrest and arterial flush was 7.7 min. No touch period was 2 to 5 min. Mean graft cold ischemia was 295 min and mean suture warm ischemia was 38 min. Postoperatively there was no primary non-function. Mean peak transaminase was 2,546 UI/ml. Patient and graft survival was 100% at one year. Two patients (15%) developed graft main bile duct stenosis and underwent endoscopic management. No patient developed symptomatic intrahepatic bile duct strictures or needed retransplantation in the follow-up. Conclusions: The experience of the transplantation department of the University of Liege confirms that controlled DCD donors may be a valuable source of transplantable liver grafts, in case of short procurement warm ischemia and short transplant cold ischemia. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 150 (24 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLiver transplantation (LT) from donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors: Multicenter Belgian experience 2003-2007
Detry, Olivier ULg; Donckier, Vincent; Lucidi, Valerio et al

in Transplant International (2009, August), 22(S2), 62-234

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (12 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLiver transplantation for acute hepatic failure due to chemotherapy-induced HBV reactivation in lymphoma patients.
Noterdaeme, Timothee; Longree, Luc; Bataille, Christian ULg et al

in World journal of gastroenterology : WJG (2011), 17(25), 3069-72

Hepatitis B (HBV) reactivation induced by chemotherapy is problem encountered recently in the management of malignant diseases. Chemotherapy-induced HBV reactivation may ultimately lead to terminal acute ... [more ▼]

Hepatitis B (HBV) reactivation induced by chemotherapy is problem encountered recently in the management of malignant diseases. Chemotherapy-induced HBV reactivation may ultimately lead to terminal acute liver failure. Liver transplantation (LT) currently remains the only definitive treatment option for such cases, but is generally denied to patients suffering from malignancy. Here, the authors describe 2 cases of cancer-free and HBV graft re-infection-free survival after LT performed for terminal liver failure arising from HBV reactivation induced by chemotherapy for advanced stage lymphoma. These 2 cases, and some other reports in the literature, may suggest that patients suffering from hematologic malignancies and terminal liver disease can be considered for LT if the prognosis of their hematologic malignancy is good. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLIVER TRANSPLANTATION FOR ACUTE HEPATIC FAILURE DUE TO CHEMOTHERAPY-INDUCED HEPATITIS B VIRUS REACTIVATION IN LYMPHOMA PATIENTS
Noterdaeme, T.; Longree, L.; Bataille, C. et al

in Transplant International (2011, February), 24(1), 10-10

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (13 ULg)
Full Text
See detailLiver transplantation for donation after cardiocirculatory death donors: Belgian experience 2003-2009
DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; Ledinh, H.; Donckier, V. et al

Conference (2011, March 24)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLiver transplantation for hepatic trauma: Discussion about a case and its management.
HONORE, Charles ULg; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; Gilson, Nathalie ULg et al

in Journal of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock (2011), 4(1), 137-9

Liver transplant for trauma is a rare condition with 19 cases described in the literature. We report the case of a 16-year-old patient who suffered a gradeV liver injury with a vena cava tear after a car ... [more ▼]

Liver transplant for trauma is a rare condition with 19 cases described in the literature. We report the case of a 16-year-old patient who suffered a gradeV liver injury with a vena cava tear after a car crash. After a computerized tomography (CT) scan, the patient was directly sent to the operating room where the surgeon performed a right hepatectomy extended to segment IV with a venous repair under discontinued hilar clamping. On day five, the patient developed acute liver failure and was put on an emergency transplant waiting list. He had a successful liver transplant 2 days later. Fifteen months after his transplant, the patient is alive and asymptomatic. This case report focuses on the patient's initial management, the importance of damage control surgery and the circumstances which finally led to the transplant. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 67 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLiver transplantation for hepatitis B virus infection: improving long-term outcomes
Detry, Olivier ULg; Delwaide, Jean ULg

in Medscape Transplantation (2001)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLiver transplantation for metastatic colon adenocarcinoma: report of a case with 10 years of follow-up without recurrence
Honore, Charles ULg; Detry, Olivier ULg; De Roover, Arnaud ULg et al

in Transplant International (2003), 16(9), 692-693

Because of dismal mid-term and long-term results, secondary liver cancer is considered an absolute contra-indication to cadaveric liver transplantation, with the relative exception of metastases of ... [more ▼]

Because of dismal mid-term and long-term results, secondary liver cancer is considered an absolute contra-indication to cadaveric liver transplantation, with the relative exception of metastases of symptomatic neuro-endocrine cancers. The authors present in this report the case of a patient who has been enjoying 10 years of cancer-free survival after liver transplantation as rescue therapy for acute liver failure after liver resection for isolated hepatic metastasis of colon adenocarcinoma. This case shows that in some highly selected cases, liver transplantation may be curative in patients with liver metastases of colon carcinoma. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 93 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLiver transplantation for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma in normal livers.
Mergental, Hynek; Adam, Rene; Ericzon, Bo-Goran et al

in Journal of Hepatology (2012), 57(2), 297-305

BACKGROUND & AIMS: The role of liver transplantation in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma in livers without fibrosis/cirrhosis (NC-HCC) is unclear. We aimed to determine selection criteria for ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND & AIMS: The role of liver transplantation in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma in livers without fibrosis/cirrhosis (NC-HCC) is unclear. We aimed to determine selection criteria for liver transplantation in patients with NC-HCC. METHODS: Using the European Liver Transplant Registry, we identified 105 patients who underwent liver transplantation for unresectable NC-HCC. Detailed information about patient, tumor characteristics, and survival was obtained from the transplant centers. Variables associated with survival were identified using univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. RESULTS: Liver transplantation was primary treatment in 62 patients and rescue therapy for intrahepatic recurrences after liver resection in 43. Median number of tumors was 3 (range 1-7) and median tumor size 8cm (range 0.5-30). One- and 5-year overall and tumor-free survival rates were 84% and 49% and 76% and 43%, respectively. Macrovascular invasion (HR 2.55, 95% CI 1.34 to 4.86), lymph node involvement (HR 2.60, 95% CI 1.28 to 5.28), and time interval between liver resection and transplantation <12months (HR 2.12, 95% CI 0.96 to 4.67) were independently associated with survival. Five-year survival in patients without macrovascular invasion or lymph node involvement was 59% (95% CI 47-70%). Tumor size was not associated with survival. CONCLUSIONS: This is the largest reported series of patients transplanted for NC-HCC. Selection of patients without macrovascular invasion or lymph node involvement, or patients 12months after previous liver resection, can result in 5-year survival rates of 59%. In contrast to HCC in cirrhosis, tumor size is not a predictor of post-transplant survival in NC-HCC. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLiver transplantation from controlled donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors: a single center experience
Detry, Olivier ULg; Veys, Caroline; Seydel, Benoît ULg et al

in Liver Transplantation (2009, July), 15(7), 180-181

Detailed reference viewed: 77 (14 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLiver transplantation from donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors: Belgian experience 2002-2007
Detry, Olivier ULg; Donckier, Vincent; Lucidi, V. et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2009, January), 72(1), 21

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLiver transplantation from donation after cardiac death donors: initial Belgian experience 2003-2007.
Detry, Olivier ULg; Donckier, Vincent; Lucidi, Valerio et al

in Transplant International (2010), 23(6), 611-618

The Belgian experience with donation after cardiac death (DCD) liver transplantation (LT) was retrospectively reviewed, particularly evaluating patient and graft survivals, and biliary complications. From ... [more ▼]

The Belgian experience with donation after cardiac death (DCD) liver transplantation (LT) was retrospectively reviewed, particularly evaluating patient and graft survivals, and biliary complications. From 2003 to 2007, 58 DCD-LT were performed in Belgium. Mean procurement total warm ischemia time was 25 +/- 2 min (mean +/- SEM). Mean cold ischemia time was 451 +/- 18 min. Mean follow-up was 23 +/- 2.2 months. Post-transplant peak aspartate aminotransminases was 2241 +/- 338 UI/l. Patient survivals at 1 month, 1 and 3 years, were 91.3%, 83.3% and 66.9% respectively. Graft survivals at 1 month, 1 and 3 years, were 84.4%, 72.4% and 48.8% respectively. Two patients (3.4%) developed primary nonfunction. Regarding the biliary complications, seven grafts (12%) were lost because of intrahepatic cholangiopathy, and 12 other patients (20.6%) developed bile duct stenoses requiring endoscopic and/or surgical management. The rate of symptomatic ischemic biliary lesions for grafts surviving more than 3 months was 38% (19/50). Although DCD organ donors may be a source of viable liver grafts, results were inferior to those obtained with donation after brain death LT in this series. Prognostic criteria have to be developed to improve results of DCD-LT. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (18 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLIVER TRANSPLANTATION FROM DONATION AFTER CARDIOCIRCULATORY DEATH (DCD) DONORS: BELGIAN EXPERIENCE 2003-2009
DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; Le Dinh, Hieu ULg; Cicarelli, Olga et al

in Transplant International (2011, September), 24(2), 84-84

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLiver transplantation in a Jehovah's witness
Detry, Olivier ULg; Honoré, Pierre ULg; Delwaide, Jean ULg et al

in Lancet (1999), 353

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (13 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLiver Transplantation in a Patient With an Intraabdominally Located Left Ventricular Assist Device : Surgical Aspects - Case Report
VERMEER, N; MEURISSE, Nicolas ULg; VLASSELAERS, D et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2012), 44

Abstract : The presence of a cardiac assist device in a liver transplantation candidate should not be considered to be an absolute contraindication to transplantation. In this first case report of liver ... [more ▼]

Abstract : The presence of a cardiac assist device in a liver transplantation candidate should not be considered to be an absolute contraindication to transplantation. In this first case report of liver transplantation in a patient with an intraabdominally located left ventricular assist device, we have described the surgical aspects and discussed the timing of the liver transplantation and the removal of the left ventricular assist device. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLiver transplantation in Jehovah's witnesses
Detry, Olivier ULg; De Roover, Arnaud ULg; Delwaide, Jean ULg et al

in Transplant International (2005), 18(8), 929-936

For religious reasons, Jehovah's witnesses refuse transfusion of blood products (red cells, platelets, plasma), but may accept organ transplantation. The authors developed a multidisciplinary protocol for ... [more ▼]

For religious reasons, Jehovah's witnesses refuse transfusion of blood products (red cells, platelets, plasma), but may accept organ transplantation. The authors developed a multidisciplinary protocol for liver transplantation in Jehovah's witnesses. In a 6-year period, nine Jehovah's witness patients were listed for liver transplantation. They received preoperative erythropoietin therapy, with iron and folic acid that allowed significant haematocrit increase. Two patients underwent partial spleen embolization to increase platelet count. Seven patients underwent cadaveric whole liver transplantation, and two right lobe living-related liver transplantation, using continuous circuit cell saving system and high dose aprotinin. No patient received any blood product during the surgical procedure. One patient suffering from deep anaemia after living-related liver transplantation was transfused as required by his family, but died from aspergillus infection. One 6-year-old child was transfused against her parent's will. The authors demonstrated that it is possible to increase haematocrit and platelet levels in cirrhotic patients awaiting liver transplantation. They were able to reduce intraoperative need for blood products, allowing liver transplantation in prepared Jehovah's witness patients. This experience may be beneficial for non-Jehovah's witness liver transplant recipients. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 85 (30 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLiver transplantation in Jehovah's witnesses
DETRY, Olivier ULg; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; DELWAIDE, Jean ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2004), 67

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLiver transplantation in Jehovah's witnesses
Detry, Olivier ULg; Honoré, Pierre ULg; De Roover, Arnaud ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2001, January), 64(1), 53

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (7 ULg)