Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
See detailModeling and observation of an upwelling filament off Cape Ghir (NW Africa) during the CAIBEX survey
Troupin, Charles ULg; Sangrà, Pablo; Arístegui, Javier et al

Poster (2010, February 22)

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailModeling and observation of an upwelling filament off Cape Ghir (NW~Africa) during the CAIBEX campaign
Troupin, Charles ULg; Arístegui, Javier; Barton, Eric Desmond et al

Poster (2009, November 27)

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailModeling and Prediction of Nonlinear Environmental System Using Bayesian Methods
Mansouri, Majdi; Dumont, Benjamin ULg; Destain, Marie-France ULg

in Computers & Electronics in Agriculture (2013), 92

An environmental dynamic system is usually modeled as a nonlinear system described by a set of nonlinear ODEs. A central challenge in computational modeling of environmental systems is the determination ... [more ▼]

An environmental dynamic system is usually modeled as a nonlinear system described by a set of nonlinear ODEs. A central challenge in computational modeling of environmental systems is the determination of the model parameters. In these cases, estimating these variables or parameters from other easily obtained measurements can be extremely useful. This work addresses the problem of monitoring and modeling a leaf area index and soil moisture model (LSM) using state estimation. The performances of various conventional and state-of-the-art state estimation techniques are compared when they are utilized to achieve this objective. These techniques include the extended Kalman filter (EKF), the particle filter (PF), and the more recently developed technique variational filter (VF). Specifically, two comparative studies are performed. In the first comparative study, the state variables (the leaf-area index LAI , the volumetric water content of the soil layer 1, HUR1 and the volumetric water content of the soil layer 2, HUR2) are estimated from noisy measurements of these variables, and the various estimation techniques are compared by computing the estimation root mean square error (RMSE) with respect to the noise-free data. In the second comparative study, the state variables as well as the model parameters are simultaneously estimated. In this case, in addition to comparing the performances of the various state estimation techniques, the effect of number of estimated model parameters on the accuracy and convergence of these techniques are also assessed. The results of both comparative studies show that the PF provides a higher accuracy than the EKF, which is due to the limited ability of the EKF to handle highly nonlinear processes. The results also show that the VF provides a significant improvement over the PF because, unlike the PF which depends on the choice of sampling distribution used to estimate the posterior distribution, the VF yields an optimum choice of the sampling distribution, which also accounts for the observed data. The results of the second comparative study show that, for all techniques, estimating more model parameters affects the estimation accuracy as well as the convergence of the estimated states and parameters. However, the VF can still provide both convergence as well as accuracy related advantages over other estimation methods. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 100 (42 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailModeling and Prediction of Time-Varying Environmental Data Using Advanced Bayesian Methods
Mansouri, Majdi ULg; Dumont, Benjamin ULg; Destain, Marie-France ULg

in Masegosa, Antoçnio; Villacorta, Pablo; Cruz-Corona, Carlos (Eds.) et al Exploring Innovative and Successful Applications of Soft Computing (2013)

The problem of state/parameter estimation represents a key issue in crop models which are nonlinear, non-Gaussian and include a large number of parameters. The prediction errors are often important due to ... [more ▼]

The problem of state/parameter estimation represents a key issue in crop models which are nonlinear, non-Gaussian and include a large number of parameters. The prediction errors are often important due to uncertainties in the equations, the input variables, and the parameters. The measurements needed to run the model (input data), to perform calibration and validation are sometimes not numerous or known with some uncertainty. In these cases, estimating the state variables and/or parameters from easily obtained measurements can be extremely useful. In this work, we address the problem of modeling and prediction of leaf area index and soil moisture (LSM) using state estimation. The performances of various conventional and state-of-the-art state estimation techniques are compared when they are utilized to achieve this objective. These techniques include the extended Kalman filter (EKF), unscented Kalman filter (UKF), particle filter (PF), and the more recently developed technique variational Bayesian filter (VF). The objective of this work is to extend the state and parameter estimation techniques (i.e., EKF, UKF, PF and VF) to better handle nonlinear and non-Gaussian processes without a priori state information, by utilizing a time-varying assumption of statistical parameters. In this case, the state vector to be estimated at any instant is assumed to follow a Gaussian model, where the expectation and the covariance matrix are both random. The randomness of the expectation and the covariance of the state/parameter vector are assumed here to further capture the uncertainty of the state distribution. One practical choice of these distributions can be a Gaussian distribution for the expectation and a multi-dimensional Wishart distribution for the covariance matrix. The assumption of random mean and random covariance of the state leads to a probability distribution covering a wide range of tail behaviors, which allows discrete jumps in the state variables. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 102 (26 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailModeling and simulation of an air conditioning chilled water system
Lebrun, Jean ULg; Lemort, Vincent ULg; Teodorese, Ion

(2006, December)

This paper is giving an overview of problems encountered and solutions available for the simulation of an air conditioning system. Focus is given on the chilling water subsystem (from the chiller to the ... [more ▼]

This paper is giving an overview of problems encountered and solutions available for the simulation of an air conditioning system. Focus is given on the chilling water subsystem (from the chiller to the cooling coil). Main component simulation models (chillers, pumps, piping, valves, cooling coils and fans) are presented; they are tuned on manufacturer’s catalogue data. The way of integrating these models into a global HVAC system simulation is illustrated thanks to one example: the simulation of (a part of) a real chilled water loop, which is submitted to an exhaustive monitoring. Cooling demands and corresponding energy consumptions are systematically simulated and measured on one-minute time basis. This provides the opportunity for a global checking of the simulation by comparing simulated and measured cooling coil outputs. Further work should also include comparisons on chiller consumptions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailModeling and Simulation of Heat and Mass Transfer During Convective Drying of Wastewater Sludge with Introduction of Shrinkage Phenomena
Bennamoun, Lyes ULg; Fraikin, Laurent ULg; Léonard, Angélique ULg

in Drying Technology (2014), 32(1), 13-22

Wastewater sludge is dried in a convective dryer using air temperatures varying from 80°C to 200°C, velocities changing from 1 m · s−1 to 2 m · s−1, and humidities ranging from . The convective dryer is ... [more ▼]

Wastewater sludge is dried in a convective dryer using air temperatures varying from 80°C to 200°C, velocities changing from 1 m · s−1 to 2 m · s−1, and humidities ranging from . The convective dryer is equipped with a camera and an infrared pyrometer to follow respectively the external surface and the temperature of the product. The experimental results show that drying kinetic can be divided into three phases: two short first phases, called adaptation and constant drying phases, and a long third phase, called falling drying rate phase. As the moisture content decreases, the camera confirms simultaneous shrinkage effect with the volume reduction of the product of about 30–45% of the initial volume. Moreover, an increase of the product temperature towards air temperature was measured with the infrared pyrometer. In a second step of this study, the experimental results are modeled and simulated using heat and mass balances applied to the product and the heated air. The drying curve is rightly expressed with fourth-degree polynomial model with a correlation coefficient that approximates the unity and with low calculated errors. An outstanding determination of the heat transfer coefficient has permitted calculating the product temperature with good agreement with experimental results. The heat transfer coefficient expressed by means of Nusselt number is presented as a function of Reynolds and Prandlt numbers, changeable with air and product characteristics taking into account shrinkage effect. Moreover, as the applied air temperatures are sufficiently high, transfer by radiation is not neglected and is introduced in the mathematical model. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailModeling and simulation of the domestic energy use in Belgium following a bottom-up approach
Georges, Emeline ULg; Gendebien, Samuel ULg; Bertagnolio, Stéphane ULg et al

in Proceedings of the CLIMA 2013 11th REHVA World Congress & 8th International Conference on IAQVEC (2013, June)

The present paper presents a “bottom-up” approach dedicated to the modeling and simulation of the domestic energy use. This methodology focuses first on a microanalysis (i.e. modeling and simulation of a ... [more ▼]

The present paper presents a “bottom-up” approach dedicated to the modeling and simulation of the domestic energy use. This methodology focuses first on a microanalysis (i.e. modeling and simulation of a set of representative households). Results from this micro-analysis are then used and extended to allow drawing conclusions at a macro-scale. The methodology can be validated by comparing simulation results to annual national energy consumption indexes or synthetic load profiles (energy consumption profiles generated from values of predefined past periods). Once the method is validated, it can be used to study the impact of different retrofit scenarios on the annual energy use and on the energy demand profiles. This paper describes the methodology developed for Belgium. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 162 (56 ULg)
Full Text
See detailModeling and Uncertainty Quantification of Thermoelastic Damping in Micro-Resonators
Lepage, Séverine; Golinval, Jean-Claude ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2006)

In the design of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) such as micro-resonators, dissipation mechanisms may have detrimental effects on the quality factor, which is directly related to the response ... [more ▼]

In the design of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) such as micro-resonators, dissipation mechanisms may have detrimental effects on the quality factor, which is directly related to the response amplitude of the system that is excited at its natural frequency. One of the major dissipation phenomena to be considered in such micro-systems is thermoelastic damping. Hence, the performance of such MEMS is directly related to their thermoelastic quality factor which has to be predicted accurately. Moreover, the performance of MEMS depends on manufacturing processes which may cause substantial uncertainty in the geometry and in the material properties of the device. The reliability of MEMS devices is affected by the inability to accurately predict the behavior of the system due to the presence of these uncertainties. The aim of this paper is to provide a framework to account for uncertainties in the finite element analysis. Particularly, the influence of uncertainties on the performance of a micro-beam is studied using Monte- Carlo simulations. A random field approach is used to characterize the variation of the material as well as the geometric properties. Their effects on the thermoelastic quality factor of a micro-beam are studied. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA modeling approach to determine the contribution of plant hydraulic conductivities on the water uptake dynamics in the soil-plant-atmosphere system
Lobet, Guillaume ULg; Pagès, Loïc; Draye, Xavier

in Plant Growth Modeling, Simulation, Visualization and Applications (PMA), 2012 IEEE Fourth International Symposium on (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (2 ULg)
See detailModeling argon dynamics in first-year sea ice
Moreau, S.; Vancoppenolle, M.; Tison, J.-L. et al

Poster (2012, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailModeling astatine production in liquid lead-bismuth spallation targets
David, J.-C.; Boudard, A.; Cugnon, Joseph ULg et al

in European Physical Journal A -- Hadrons & Nuclei (2013), 49

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (17 ULg)
Full Text
See detailModeling Biogeochemical Processes in Marine Ecosystems
Grégoire, Marilaure ULg; Oguz, Temel

in Nihoul, Jacques; Chen, Arthur (Eds.) the Unesco Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (2005)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailModeling cell/matrix growth in three dimensional scaffolds under dynamic culture conditions
Guyot, Yann ULg; Papantoniou, Ioannis; Chai, Yoke Chin et al

Conference (2013, October)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailModeling climate change impacts on groundwater resources using transient stochastic climatic scenarios
Goderniaux, Pascal ULg; Brouyère, Serge ULg; Blenkinsop, Stephen et al

in Water Resources Research (2011), 47

Several studies have highlighted the potential negative impact of climate change on groundwater reserves but additional work is required to help water managers to plan for future changes. In particular ... [more ▼]

Several studies have highlighted the potential negative impact of climate change on groundwater reserves but additional work is required to help water managers to plan for future changes. In particular, existing studies provide projections for a stationary climate representative of the end of the century, although information is demanded for the near-future. Such time-slice experiments fail to account for the transient nature of climatic changes over the century. Moreover, uncertainty linked to natural climate variability is not explicitly considered in previous studies. In this study, we substantially improve upon the state-of-the-art by using a sophisticated transient weather generator (WG) in combination with an integrated surface-subsurface hydrological model (Geer basin, Belgium) developed with the finite element modelling software 'HydroGeoSphere'. This version of the WG enables the stochastic generation of large numbers of equiprobable climatic time series, representing transient climate change, and used to assess impacts in a probabilistic way. For the Geer basin, 30 equiprobable climate change scenarios from 2010 to 2085 have been generated for each of 6 different RCMs. Results show that although the 95% confidence intervals calculated around projected groundwater levels remain large, the climate change signal becomes stronger than that of natural climate variability by 2085. Additionally, the WG ability to simulate transient climate change enabled the assessment of the likely timescale and associated uncertainty of a specific impact, providing managers with additional information when planning further investment. This methodology constitutes a real improvement in the field of groundwater projections under climate change conditions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (21 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailModeling Daily Traffic Counts: Analyzing the Effects of Holidays
Cools, Mario ULg; Moons, Elke; Wets, Geert

in Sloboda, Brian (Ed.) Transportation Statistics (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailModeling external and internal drug exposure: assessing their causal biomedical consequences
Comté, Laetitia ULg

Doctoral thesis (2012)

C’est un fait notoire que beaucoup de patients ne suivent pas parfaitement le traitement prescrit par leur médecin mais se permettent bien des écarts. Cependant, à notre époque où les thérapies sont de ... [more ▼]

C’est un fait notoire que beaucoup de patients ne suivent pas parfaitement le traitement prescrit par leur médecin mais se permettent bien des écarts. Cependant, à notre époque où les thérapies sont de plus en plus pointues et où, pour certaines maladies, un suivi strict du régime thérapeutique est essentiel, toute variation par rapport à ce régime peut être dommageable à l’efficacité du traitement. Cette non-adhésion aux traitements prescrits à été scientifiquement étudiée dès la seconde moitié du vingtième siècle et plus particulièrement, ces trente dernières années. Il a été ainsi prouvé qu’elle est une des causes premières dans la diversité des réponses cliniques aux traitements. Comme l’a dit le médecin général des Etats-Unis, Everett Koop, “Les médicaments ne fonctionnent pas pour des patients qui ne les prennent pas” (i.e. “Drugs don’t work in patients who don’t take them”). L’avènement des piluliers électroniques a révolutionné la recherche sur l’adhésion des patients au régime thérapeutique prescrit. En effet, ces piluliers permettent aujourd’hui de mémoriser l’historique de la prise du médicament de chaque patient grâce à un circuit électronique dans leur couvercle qui enregistre la date et l’heure de chaque ouverture. De telles nouvelles données devaient être exploitées de manière optimale. Comment y parvenir? Afin de répondre à cette question, il est tout d’abord nécessaire de préciser exactement la signification de ce concept d’‘adhésion à un traitement’ (en anglais: ‘adherence’ ou encore en français ‘observance’). Cette adhésion d’un patient à un traitement a été définie comme une mesure globale de la conformité de l’historique de prises de ce patient avec celui qu’il aurait connu s’il avait suivi le régime thérapeutique prescrit (Sackett and Haynes 1976). Une mesure globale est le plus souvent insuffisante pour une étude appronfondie des cas de non-adhésion. Pour le prouver, considérons par exemple le cas d’un patient qui doit prendre un médicament 2 fois par jour pendant 4 mois. S’il ne prend que la dose du matin pendant 4 mois, son adhésion sera évaluée à 50%. Toutefois, s’il prend ses deux doses correctement mais seulement pendant 2 mois puis qu’il stoppe le traitement, son adhésion sera également évaluée à 50%. PPourtant ces 2 types de comportement risquent d’engendrer des conséquences pharmacologiques bien différentes. On sépara alors le concept d’adhésion en trois composantes : l’initiation, l’exécution du régime thérapeutique et la persistance au traitement. Ainsi, dans le premier exemple repris ci-dessus, l’exécution du régime est incorrecte mais la persistance est maximale (4 mois) tandis que dans le second, l’exécution du régime est correcte mais plus la persistance (2 mois). La persistance correspond à la durée totale depuis l’initiation, correspondant à la première prise, jusqu’à l’arrêt du traitement. L’exécution du régime thérapeutique est une notion plus délicate à caractériser car elle peut varier de différentes manières et tout au long du traitement; c’est donc une variable multidimensionnelle. Elle résulte de la comparaison entre l’historique de prises du patient, tant que celui-ci est engagé dans le traitement, avec l’historique de prises attendu par le régime thérapeutique prescrit. Malheureusement, la mesure de l’exécution du traitement est trop souvent ramenée à un simple pourcentage (par exemple, le pourcentage des doses prescrites effectivement prises sur un intervalle de temps déterminé ou encore le pourcentage de jours où le nombre de doses prescrites à été respecté, etc...) que certains chercheurs exploitent en fixant arbitrairement une valeur qui permet de répartir les patients en deux groupes: ‘bons’ ou ‘mauvais’ exécutants. Cette valeur arbitrairement choisie fait pourtant bien peu de cas de cette question essentielle et toujours présente: ‘Comment peut-on juger si l’adhésion est suffisante?’. Pour illustrer la faiblesse de cette façon de faire, citons Harrigan (2005) qui montra que, pour des patients séropositifs, une haute mais non parfaite exposition au médicament, exposition que l’on aurait tendance à juger suffisante, peut s’avérer plus dommageable en terme de résistance au traitement qu’une plus faible exposition. En effet, sur base des relevés d’ordonnances pharmaceutiques (‘prescription refill data’), il montra que c’est dans la tranche 80% à 90% de doses achetées par rapport aux doses prescrites qu’il y a le plus risque de développer une résistance au traitement. Voilà donc pourquoi, dans la première partie de cette thèse, notre but a été d’étudier toute une série de façons de mesurer l’exposition au traitement afin de déterminer celle(s) qui engloberai(en)t le plus de caractéristiques de l’historique des prises. Après avoir présenté le concept d’adhésion au premier chapitre, nous avons examiné au chapitre suivant non seulement les pourcentages classiques de doses prises, mais aussi la variabilité du moment de la prise du médicament en prenant soin de distinguer l’étude des prises du matin de l’étude de celles du soir, la distribution des intervalles de temps entre les doses successives, l’occurrence de doses manquantes consécutives, etc... Nous avons ainsi obtenu 26 variables résumant l’historique de doses prises. Nous avons cherché ensuite à identifier 3 groupes de patients via la méthode de classification de Hartigan (Hartigan K-Means Clustering method). Notre but étant de caractériser l’exécution du traitement pour les patients de chaque groupe par les variables les plus pertinentes parmi les 26 variables obtenues, nous avons proposé un algorithme basé sur la théorie du ‘multidimensional scaling’ qui nous permet de garder les principales caractéristiques des données de chaque groupe malgré la réduction de l’ensemble des variables. Cela nous a permis de mettre en évidence que les variables sources principales de discrimination en groupes de patients sont relatives à la quantité de doses prises. Il s’est avéré que ces mêmes variables expliquent également la non-persistance des patients, tout comme certaines variables relatives à la variabilité dans les moments de prise du médicament. Cela conforte l’idée qu’une mauvaise exposition pourrait entraîner l’arrêt du médicament (non-persistance). Ces efforts de classification n’ont cependant pas suffi à obtenir une caractérisation claire des groupes de patients. En effet, chaque patient peut dévier du traitement prescrit de multiples et diverses façons durant son traitement (par exemple, une fois en manquant la dose du soir, une autre fois celle du matin, ou encore celle du samedi ou celle du mercredi ou en montrant une grande variabilité dans ses prises sur une certaine période,...). Dans un second temps, cherchant toujours une mesure de l’exposition au traitement englobant le plus de caractéristiques de l’historique des prises, nous avons investigué une mesure de l’exposition au traitement via la concentration du médicament dans le sang. Il s’agit donc d’une mesure ‘interne’ de l’exposition au traitement du patient. Elle combine les acquis de la pharmacocinétique à l’historique des prises du patient (Vrijens et al 2005b). Puisque cette mesure interne requiert l’utilisation d’un modèle pharmacocinétique, ce type de modèle est présenté au Chapitre 3. Ensuite, au Chapitre 4, nous avons utilisé cette mesure interne de l’exposition pour comparer deux régimes de prises d’un médicament: une fois par jour (QD) et deux fois par jour (BID) pour des patients séropositifs. Nous avons ainsi pu montrer que le régime QD permet un moins grand nombre d’oublis du médicament que le régime BID par contre tout oubli affecte plus gravement la concentration du médicament dans le sang que le régime BID (L. Comté et al 2007). La deuxième partie de cette thèse a pour but d’intégrer les mesures d’exposition aux modèles statistiques permettant d’évaluer l’efficacité d’un traitement. Les méthodes statistiques classiques ne tiennent pas compte de la façon dont le traitement a été pris (exposition au traitement) et permettent donc seulement d’étudier l’effet moyen du traitement tel qu’il a été prescrit aux patients. Pourtant, dans certains cas, et surtout avec des traitements de longues durées (maladies chroniques : infection par VIH, diabète, etc), il devient intéressant, en vue de l’évaluation de l’effet d’un traitement, d’intégrer aux modèles la façon dont le patient a respecté le régime médicamenteux qui lui a été prescrit. Mais une difficulté apparaît puisque les modèles statistiques classiques de régression ne permettent pas l’interprétation causale directe de l’effet de la mesure de l’exposition sur la réponse clinique au traitement. En effet, l’exposition ne se mesurant qu’après l’échantillonnage, elle peut donc elle-même être influencée par la réponse clinique (Lee et al 1991; Goetghebeur and Pocock 1993). En présence de telles interactions possibles, des modèles spéciaux (‘causal models’) sont nécessaires pour une estimation non biaisée de l’effet de la dose prise. Jusqu’aujourd’hui, les méthodes basées sur les modèles structuraux moyens (structural mean models) développés par Robins (Robins 1994; Fisher-Lapp and Goetghebeur 1999) sont celles qui permettent le plus de flexibilité mais sont pourtant peu utilisées dans la pratique en raison de leur plus grande complexité par rapport aux modèles statistiques classiques. De ce fait, elles sont également moins souvent représentées dans les logiciels informatiques. Ainsi, au Chapitre 5, nous avons détaillé le modèle structural moyen log-linéaire ainsi qu’introduit un nouvel outil diagnostique pour les modèles structuraux moyens linéaires et log-linéaires. Nous avons ensuite appliqué ces modèles à un ensemble de données concernant des patients souffrant de problèmes gastriques, randomisés entre un traitement et un placebo tous deux prescrits ‘à la demande’. Ce régime, comme son nom l’indique, demande aux patients de prendre le médicament lorsque les symptômes apparaissent ce qui constitue un cas particulièrement représentatif de la nécessité d’utiliser un modèle spécial afin d’éviter un biais puisque l’exposition dépend de l’état clinique du patient (L. Comté et al 2009). Pour parachever cet ouvrage, nous avons combiné, au Chapitre 6, la mesure interne de l’exposition au traitement (via la pharmacocinétique) et les modèles structuraux, pour mesurer l’évolution de la charge virale en fonction de cette exposition interne pour des patients séropositifs n’ayant jamais reçu de traitement auparavant. Pour ce type de patients, la décroissance de la charge virale est en effet un bon indicateur du succès du traitement. Il devient dès lors intéressant de quantifier la relation causale entre l’exposition interne (mesure pharmacocinétique) et la décroissance de la charge virale. Comme on s’intéresse à l’évolution de cette charge virale au cours des visites, l’exposition interne sera mesurée entre chaque visite c’est-à-dire sur des intervalles de temps. Les modèles structuraux moyens emboîtés (Structural nested mean models) sont alors détaillés et ensuite utilisés afin d’estimer cette relation causale entre les différentes séquences d’expositions internes et l’évolution de la charge virale. Nous avons ainsi pu mettre en évidence une réduction substantielle et significative de la charge virale pouvant être attribuée à l’exposition interne au médicament d’un patient tant qu’il est en phase décroissante. Cette réduction sera d’autant plus importante que la charge virale était élevée à la visite précédente (L. Comté et al 2011). En résumé, nous pensons que notre travail permet de mieux cibler le challenge d’une modélisation adéquate de l’exposition au traitement et donc l’utilité d’une mesure interne au patient. De plus, il permet de mieux comprendre l’impact de l’exposition au traitement sur l’efficacité d’un traitement. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (12 ULg)