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See detailMolecular adaptations of enzymes from thermophilic and psychrophilic organisms
Arpigny, J. L.; Feller, Georges ULg; Davail, S. et al

in Giles, R. (Ed.) Advances in Comparative and Environmental Physiology Vol. 20 (1994)

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See detailMolecular adaptations to cold in psychrophilic enzymes
Feller, Georges ULg

in Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences : CMLS (2003), 60(4), 648-662

Psychrophiles or cold-loving organisms successfully colonize cold environments of the Earth's biosphere. To cope with the reduction of chemical reaction rates induced by low temperatures, these organisms ... [more ▼]

Psychrophiles or cold-loving organisms successfully colonize cold environments of the Earth's biosphere. To cope with the reduction of chemical reaction rates induced by low temperatures, these organisms synthesize enzymes characterized by a high catalytic activity at low temperatures associated, however, with low thermal stability. Thanks to recent advances provided by Xray crystallography, protein engineering and biophysical studies, we are beginning to understand the molecular adaptations responsible for these properties which appear to be relatively diverse. The emerging picture suggests that psychrophilic enzymes utilize an improved flexibility of the structures involved in the catalytic cycle, whereas other protein regions if not implicated in catalysis may or may not be subjected to genetic drift. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular alterations in breast cancers : deregulation of c-erbB2 gene expression.
Gol-Winkler, Rose; Pasleau, Françoise ULg; Grooteclaes, Madeleine et al

Conference (1993, September)

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See detailMolecular analysis and mating behaviour of the Trichophyton mentagrophytes species complex
Symoens, F.; Jousson, O.; Planard, C. et al

in International Journal of Medical Microbiology (2011), 301(3), 260-266

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See detailMolecular analysis for hybrid detection between European mink (Mustela lutreola) and polecat (Mustela putorius)
Cabria, Maria Teresa; Gomez-Moliner, Benjamin; Zardoya, Rafael et al

in abstract book of the 7th Baltic Theriological conference (2008)

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See detailMolecular Analysis in Two Siblings African Patients with Severe Form of Hunter Syndrome: Identification of a Novel (P.Y54x) Nonsense Mutation
Mutesa, Léon; Muganga, N.; Lissens, Willy et al

in Journal of Tropical Pediatrics (2007), 53(6), 434-7

Hunter syndrome (or Mucopolysaccharidosis type II, MPS II) is an X-linked recessive disorder due to the deficiency of the iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) enzyme, resulting in the accumulation of heparan and ... [more ▼]

Hunter syndrome (or Mucopolysaccharidosis type II, MPS II) is an X-linked recessive disorder due to the deficiency of the iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) enzyme, resulting in the accumulation of heparan and dermatan sulfates in the lysosomes. The heterogeneity of clinical phenotypes, ranging from mild-to-severe forms, is a result of different mutations in the IDS gene. We report here, a novel nonsense mutation (p.Y54X) in two siblings MPS II African patients affected with a severe form of the disease. We postulated that the p.Y54X mutation which causes a loss of the IDS region highly conserved among sulfatase enzymes, could be predicted as a severe disease-causing mutation for Hunter syndrome. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular analysis of interaction between fluorescent Pseudomonads and Pythium spp
Jacques, Philippe ULg; Mistry, Ch.; Ongena, Marc ULg et al

Poster (1992, July)

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See detailMolecular analysis of root medium impact on Arabidopsis thaliana development
Bouché, Frédéric ULg; André, Julie; Tocquin, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2013, April 18)

Hydroponics and soil are the most common media used for plant growth. Hydroponics has the main advantage of providing easy access to the root system and is therefore commonly used for gene expression ... [more ▼]

Hydroponics and soil are the most common media used for plant growth. Hydroponics has the main advantage of providing easy access to the root system and is therefore commonly used for gene expression analyses in molecular studies of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the impact of root substrate on plant growth remains poorly documented. Here we show that hydroponics accelerates both shoot growth and developmental phases as compared with culture on soil. In order to identify molecular changes in the roots that could account for these medium effects, a transcriptomic comparison was performed by microarray analysis. This experiment revealed that more than 20% of the genes were differentially expressed in hydroponics vs soil. Among them, the flowering time gene FLOWERING LOCUS C and two clades of microRNA targeted genes. To further assess the role of these genes in roots, artificial microRNAs were designed for root specific expression in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular analysis of the FOLR genes in patients with cerebral folate deficiency
SEGERS, Karin ULg; Hanson, J; RAMAEKERS, Vincent ULg et al

Poster (2010, November 02)

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See detailMolecular analysis of the interfacial and membrane-interacting properties of D-xylose-based bolaforms
Nasir, Mehmet Nail ULg; Legrand, Vincent; Gatard, Sylvain et al

Poster (2012, October)

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See detailMolecular Analysis Of The Ycr-242 Gene Encoding The Putative Mitochondrial Asparaginyl-Transfer-Rna Synthetase From Saccharomyces-Cerevisiae
Landrieu, I.; Vandenbol, Micheline ULg; Portetelle, Daniel ULg et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie de Biochimie et de Biophysique (1994), 102(2),

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See detailMolecular and atomic hydrogen in the environment of hot, massive stars
St-Louis, N.; Gervais, S.; Morel, Thierry ULg et al

in Wolf-Rayet Phenomena in Massive Stars and Starburst Galaxies (1999)

Not Available

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See detailMolecular and cellular basis of the altered immune response against arsonate in irradiated A/J mice autologously reconstituted.
Ismaili, Jamila; Razanajaona, Diane; Van Acker, Annette et al

in International Immunology (1999), 11(7), 1157-67

The humoral immune response to arsonate (Ars) in normal A/J mice is dominated in the late primary and particularly in the secondary response by a recurrent and dominant idiotype (CRIA) which is encoded by ... [more ▼]

The humoral immune response to arsonate (Ars) in normal A/J mice is dominated in the late primary and particularly in the secondary response by a recurrent and dominant idiotype (CRIA) which is encoded by a single canonical combination of the variable gene segments: VHidcr11-DFL16.1-JH2 and Vkappa10-Jkappa1. Accumulation of somatic mutations within cells expressing this canonical combination or some less frequent Ig rearrangements results in the generation of high-affinity antibodies. By contrast, in partially shielded and irradiated A/J mice (autologous reconstitution) immunized with Ars-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), both the dominance of the CRIA idiotype and the affinity maturation are lost, whereas the anti-Ars antibody titer is not affected. To understand these alterations, we have analyzed a collection of 27 different anti-Ars hybridomas from nine partially shielded and irradiated A/J mice that had been immunized twice with Ars-KLH. Sequence analysis of the productively rearranged heavy chain variable region genes from those hybridomas revealed that (i) the canonical V(D)J combination was rare, (ii) the pattern of V(D)J gene usage rather corresponded to a primary repertoire with multiple gene combinations and (iii) the frequency of somatic mutations was low when compared to a normal secondary response to Ars. In addition, immunohistological analysis has shown a delay of 2 weeks in the appearance of full blown splenic germinal centers in autoreconstituting mice, as compared to controls. Such a model could be useful to understand the immunological defects found in patients transplanted with bone marrow. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular and cellular insights into IKAP and Elongator functions
Close, Pierre ULg

Doctoral thesis (2006)

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See detailMolecular and Clinicopathological Diagnosis of Non-Wildebeest Associated Malignant Catarrhal Fever in Belgium
Desmecht, Daniel ULg; Cassart, Dominique ULg; Rollin, Frédéric ULg et al

in Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association (1999), 144(14), 388

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See detailMolecular and Morphological Aspects of Annealing-Induced Stabilization of Starch Crystallites
Gomand, Sara; Lamberts, Lieve; Gommes, Cédric ULg et al

in Biomacromolecules (2012), 13

A unique series of potato (mutant) starches with highly different amylopectin/amylose (AP/AM) ratios was annealed in excess water at stepwise increasing temperatures to increase the starch melting (or ... [more ▼]

A unique series of potato (mutant) starches with highly different amylopectin/amylose (AP/AM) ratios was annealed in excess water at stepwise increasing temperatures to increase the starch melting (or gelatinization) temperatures in aqueous suspensions. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments revealed that the lamellar starch crystals gain stability upon annealing via thickening for high-AM starch, whereas the crystal surface energy decreases for AM-free starch. In starches with intermediate AP/AM ratio, both mechanisms occur, but the surface energy reduction mechanism prevails. Crystal thickening seems to be associated with the cocrystallization of AM with AP, leading to very disordered nanomorphologies for which a new SAXS data interpretation scheme needed to be developed. Annealing affects neither the crystal internal structure nor the spherulitic morphology on a micrometer length scale. [less ▲]

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See detailA molecular and morphological recircumscription of Brachytheciastrum (Brachytheciaceae, Bryopsida)
Vanderpoorten, Alain ULg; Ignatov, M. S.; Huttunen, S. et al

in Taxon (2005), 54(2), 369-376

ITS, rps4, and atpB-rbcL sequences were used to test recent taxonomic rearrangements in the moss genus Brachytheciastrum. A starting phylogenetic hypothesis of Brachytheciaceae was used to subsample ... [more ▼]

ITS, rps4, and atpB-rbcL sequences were used to test recent taxonomic rearrangements in the moss genus Brachytheciastrum. A starting phylogenetic hypothesis of Brachytheciaceae was used to subsample representative genera of each subfamily to obtain a robust backbone phylogeny and circumscribe Brachytheciastrum within the family. The strongly supported monophyletic Brachytheciastrum clade includes B. bellicum Vanderpoorten, Ignatov, Huttunen [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular And Morphological Variation Of Rare Endemic Oncocyclus Irises (Iridaceae) Of Lebanon
Saad, Layla ULg; Mahy, Grégory ULg

in Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society (2009), 159

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See detailMolecular and pigment studies of the picophytoplankton in a region of the Southern Ocean (42-54 degrees S, 141-144 degrees E) in March 1998
Wilmotte, Annick ULg; Demonceau, Caroline; Goffart, Anne ULg et al

in Deep-Sea Research Part II, Topical Studies in Oceanography (2002), 49(16), 3351-3363

Seven filtered seawater samples (depths between 30 and 55 m) collected during the SAZ project of the Austral summer of 1997-1998 were used for a simultaneous study of the picophytoplankton pigments based ... [more ▼]

Seven filtered seawater samples (depths between 30 and 55 m) collected during the SAZ project of the Austral summer of 1997-1998 were used for a simultaneous study of the picophytoplankton pigments based on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses and flow cytometry, and of the molecular diversity of the picophytoplankton based on their rDNA sequences. The sampling sites could be divided into three temperature zones, distinguished by their proximity to the Sub-Antarctic and Polar Fronts. HPLC analysis of total chlorophylls and carotenoids showed fairly low phytoplankton concentrations (77-262 ng chl al(-1)), with minimal values of the pigments in the two samples of the Polar Front Zone around 54degreesS (water temperature of 4degreesC at time of collection). In this zone, a similar decrease of particles, identified as cyanobacteria on the basis of their fluorescence, was observed by flow cytometry. Sequences very similar to the 16S rDNA sequence of Synechococcus WH8103 were present in all samples. This Synechococcus genotype is thus found in the Southern Ocean in addition to the Atlantic and Pacific locations where it has been previously observed. The yield of PCR products was lower in the two samples taken in the Polar Front Zone, showing a good agreement between molecular and pigment data. 16S rDNA sequences of plastids of eukaryotic algae also were retrieved, mostly related to those of an environmental clone called OM164, which has not been cultivated but has phylogenetic affinities to the Raphidophyceae. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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