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See detailLiposome surface charge influence on skin penetration behaviour
Gillet, Aline ULg; Compère, Philippe ULg; Lecomte, Frédéric ULg et al

in International Journal of Pharmaceutics (2011), 411(1-2), 223-231

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See detailLiposomes and parameters affecting their skin penetration behaviour
Gillet, Aline ULg; Evrard, Brigitte ULg; Piel, Géraldine ULg

in Journal of Drug Delivery Science and Technology [=JDDST] (2011), 21

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See detailLiposomes entrapping apigenin for the treatment of glioblastoma
Karim, Reatul ULg; Palazzo, Claudio ULg; Dubois, Nadège ULg et al

Poster (2015, April 17)

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See detailLiposomes loaded with diglyceride ester of methotrexate and mephalan: sutdies on stability and hemocompatibilit
Kuznetsova, N; Sevrin, Chantal ULg; Lespineux, David et al

Poster (2009, September 28)

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See detailLiposomes loaded with diglyceride esters of methotrexate and melphalan: studies on stability and hemocompatibility
Kuznetsova, N; Kandyba, A; Bovin, N et al

in Proceedings of the International Liposome Society 2009 Meeting (2009, December 12)

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See detailLiposomes loaded with diglyceride esters of methotrexate and mephalan studies on stability and hemocompatibility
Kuznetsova, N; Kandyba, A.K.; Bovin, N et al

in European Cells and Materials (2010, November 03), 20(3), 152

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See detailLiposomes loaded with diglyceride esters of methotrexate and mephalan studies on stability and hemocompatibility
Kuznetsova, N; Kandyba, A.K; Bovin, N et al

Poster (2010, August 24)

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See detailThe lipoxygenase metabolic pathway in plants: potential for industrial production of natural green leaf volatiles
Gigot, Cédric ULg; Ongena, Marc ULg; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2010), 14(3), 451-460

Lipoxygenase enzymatic pathway is a widely studied mechanism in the plant kingdom. Combined actions of three enzymes: lipase, lipoxygenase (LOX) and hydroperoxide lyase (HPL) convert lipidic substrates ... [more ▼]

Lipoxygenase enzymatic pathway is a widely studied mechanism in the plant kingdom. Combined actions of three enzymes: lipase, lipoxygenase (LOX) and hydroperoxide lyase (HPL) convert lipidic substrates such as C18:2 and C18:3 fatty acids into short chain volatiles. These reactions, triggered by cell membrane disruptions, produce compounds known as Green Leaf Volatiles (GLVs) which are C6 or C9-aldehydes and alcohols. These GLVs are commonly used as flavors to confer a fresh green odor of vegetable to food products. Therefore, competitive biocatalytic productions have been developed to meet the high demand in these natural flavors. Vegetable oils, chosen for their lipidic acid profile, are converted by soybean LOX and plant HPL into natural GLVs. However this second step of the bioconversion presents low yield due to the HPL instability and the inhibition by its substrate. This paper will shortly describe the different enzymes involved in this bioconversion with regards to their chemical and enzymatic properties. Biotechnological techniques to enhance their production potentialities will be discussed along with their implication in a complete bioprocess, from the lipid substrate to the corresponding aldehydic or alcoholic flavors. [less ▲]

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See detailLipoxygenase pathway and antioxidant system in salt-stressed tomato seedlings (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.).
Delaplace, Pierre ULg; Frettinger, P.; Ghanem, M. E. et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2009), 13

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See detailLes lipoxygénases du soja.
Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULg; Marlier, M.

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (1997), 1(2), 125-141

Dans cet article de synthèse, les auteurs font le point sur les connaissances actuelles dans le domaine des lioxygénases du soja. Une attention particulière est portée à la compréhension des mécanismes ... [more ▼]

Dans cet article de synthèse, les auteurs font le point sur les connaissances actuelles dans le domaine des lioxygénases du soja. Une attention particulière est portée à la compréhension des mécanismes réactionnels (substrats, inhibiteurs, site actif, etc.). Le rôle physiologique ainsi que l'utilisation de cet enzuyme dans les industries agroalimentaires et en biotechnologie sont également abordés. [less ▲]

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See detailLipschitz robust control from off-policy trajectories
Fonteneau, Raphaël ULg; Ernst, Damien ULg; Boigelot, Bernard ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 53rd IEEE Conference on Decision and Control (IEEE CDC 2014) (2014)

We study the minmax optimization problem introduced in [Fonteneau et al. (2011), ``Towards min max reinforcement learning'', Springer CCIS, vol. 129, pp. 61-77] for computing control policies for batch ... [more ▼]

We study the minmax optimization problem introduced in [Fonteneau et al. (2011), ``Towards min max reinforcement learning'', Springer CCIS, vol. 129, pp. 61-77] for computing control policies for batch mode reinforcement learning in a deterministic setting with fixed, finite optimization horizon. First, we state that the $\min$ part of this problem is NP-hard. We then provide two relaxation schemes. The first relaxation scheme works by dropping some constraints in order to obtain a problem that is solvable in polynomial time. The second relaxation scheme, based on a Lagrangian relaxation where all constraints are dualized, can also be solved in polynomial time. We theoretically show that both relaxation schemes provide better results than those given in [Fonteneau et al. (2011)] [less ▲]

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See detailLiquid cation exchanger
Erhardt, F; Haas, T; Roos, M et al

Patent (2012)

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See detailLiquid chromatographic analysis of local anesthetics in human plasma after sample preparation by on-line dialysis. Optimization by use of experimental design
Chiap, Patrice ULg; Boulanger, Bruno ULg; Fotsing, Lucas ULg et al

in Chromatographia (2001), 53(11-12), 678-686

A fully automated method involving dialysis, clean-up and enrichment of the dialysate on a pre-column packed with a strong cation-exchange phase, and subsequent liquid chromatographic (LC) analysis with ... [more ▼]

A fully automated method involving dialysis, clean-up and enrichment of the dialysate on a pre-column packed with a strong cation-exchange phase, and subsequent liquid chromatographic (LC) analysis with UV detection at 220 nm has been developed for the determination of local anesthetics (prilocaine, mepivacaine, and bupivacaine) in human plasma. All sample-handling operations were executed automatically by means of an Asted XI system. To identify the most important conditions affecting analyte recovery from the dialysis and trace-enrichment processes, a seven-factor D-optimal design with 16 experimental points was elaborated as a screening test A four-factor D-optimal design with 24 experimental points was then used to predict and optimize analyte recovery. Derringer's desirability function was also used to deduce optimum conditions for analyte recovery and dialysis time within the experimental domain. Finally, the method developed was validated. Mean recoveries were approximately 72% for bupivacaine and approximately 67% for mepivacaine and prilocaine. The limits of quantification were 28 ng mL(-1) for bupivacaine and 25 ng mL(-1) for mepivacaine and prilocaine. [less ▲]

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See detailLiquid chromatographic determination of enrofloxacin in nasal secretions and plasma of healthy pigs using restricted access material for on-line sample clean-up
Bimazubute, M. A.; Rozet, Eric ULg; Dizier, Isabelle ULg et al

in Journal of Chromatography. A (2008), 1189(1-2), 456-466

A new fully automated method was developed for the quantitative analysis of an antibacterial drug, enrofloxacin (ENRO), in both nasal secretions and plasma samples of healthy pigs. The method is based on ... [more ▼]

A new fully automated method was developed for the quantitative analysis of an antibacterial drug, enrofloxacin (ENRO), in both nasal secretions and plasma samples of healthy pigs. The method is based on the use of a pre-column packed with restricted access material (RAM), namely RP-18 ADS (alkyl diol silica), for on-line sample clean-up coupled to a liquid chromatographic (LC) column containing octadecyl silica. The only off-line sample preparation was the 50-fold dilution of nasal secretions and plasma samples in the washing liquid composed of 25 mM phosphate buffer of pH 7.4. A 10 μl diluted sample volume was injected directly onto the pre-column and washed for 7 min. By rotation of a switching valve, the analyte of interest was eluted in the back-flush mode with the LC mobile phase which consisted in a mixture of 25 mM phosphate buffer of pH 3.0 and acetonitrile according to a segmented gradient elution. By a new rotation of the switching valve, the pre-column and the analytical column were equilibrated for 3 min with the initial mobile phases. The flow-rate was 0.8 ml min−1 for the washing liquid and 1.5 ml min−1 for the LC mobile phase. ENRO was detected by fluorescence at excitation and emission wavelengths of 278 and 445 nm, respectively. Finally, the developed method was validated using an original strategy based on total measurement error and accuracy profiles as a decision tool. The limits of quantitation of ENRO in plasma and in nasal secretions were 30.5 and 91.6 ng/ml, respectively. The validated method was then applied successfully to the determination of ENRO in healthy pigs treated by intramuscular injection at different doses (2.5, 10 and 30 mg/kg bodyweight) for a pilot study. This method could be also used for the simultaneous analysis of ENRO and its main metabolite, ciprofloxacin (CIPRO). [less ▲]

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