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See detailMolecular and pigment studies of the picophytoplankton in a region of the Southern Ocean (42-54 degrees S, 141-144 degrees E) in March 1998
Wilmotte, Annick ULg; Demonceau, Caroline; Goffart, Anne ULg et al

in Deep-Sea Research Part II, Topical Studies in Oceanography (2002), 49(16), 3351-3363

Seven filtered seawater samples (depths between 30 and 55 m) collected during the SAZ project of the Austral summer of 1997-1998 were used for a simultaneous study of the picophytoplankton pigments based ... [more ▼]

Seven filtered seawater samples (depths between 30 and 55 m) collected during the SAZ project of the Austral summer of 1997-1998 were used for a simultaneous study of the picophytoplankton pigments based on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses and flow cytometry, and of the molecular diversity of the picophytoplankton based on their rDNA sequences. The sampling sites could be divided into three temperature zones, distinguished by their proximity to the Sub-Antarctic and Polar Fronts. HPLC analysis of total chlorophylls and carotenoids showed fairly low phytoplankton concentrations (77-262 ng chl al(-1)), with minimal values of the pigments in the two samples of the Polar Front Zone around 54degreesS (water temperature of 4degreesC at time of collection). In this zone, a similar decrease of particles, identified as cyanobacteria on the basis of their fluorescence, was observed by flow cytometry. Sequences very similar to the 16S rDNA sequence of Synechococcus WH8103 were present in all samples. This Synechococcus genotype is thus found in the Southern Ocean in addition to the Atlantic and Pacific locations where it has been previously observed. The yield of PCR products was lower in the two samples taken in the Polar Front Zone, showing a good agreement between molecular and pigment data. 16S rDNA sequences of plastids of eukaryotic algae also were retrieved, mostly related to those of an environmental clone called OM164, which has not been cultivated but has phylogenetic affinities to the Raphidophyceae. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular bands in cometary spectra. Identifications
Swings, Polydore ULg

in Reviews of Modern Physics (1942), 14

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See detailMolecular bases of the interaction between human prolactin and its membrane receptor: A ten year study
KINET, Sandrina; BERNICHTEIN, Sophie; LLOVERA, Marta et al

in Recent research developments in endocrinology (2001), 2

In this review, we make a chronologically overview of a project aimed at deciphering the molecular bases of the mechanism by which prolactin, a pituitary-secreted polypeptidic hormone, interacts with its ... [more ▼]

In this review, we make a chronologically overview of a project aimed at deciphering the molecular bases of the mechanism by which prolactin, a pituitary-secreted polypeptidic hormone, interacts with its membrane receptor, a member of the cytokine receptor superfamily. This study, based essentially on structural and mutational analysis of human prolactin, has identified two regions interacting with the receptor, named binding sites 1 and 2. We have also provided evidence that prolactin induces dimerization of its receptor through its two binding sites, and based on that mechanism of activation, we have engineered and characterized prolactin antagonists able to block the effect of the hormone by competition for receptor binding. Our study has also highlighted the importance of using well characterized bioassays to monitor such a structure-function study since the properties of a given hormone analog were shown to strongly differ depending on the bioassay used. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular basis of cold adaptation
D'Amico, Salvino ULg; Claverie, P.; Collins, T. et al

in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London Series B-Biological Sciences (2002), 357(1423), 917-924

Cold-adapted, or psychrophilic, organisms are able to thrive at low temperatures in permanently cold environments, which in fact characterize the greatest proportion of our planet. Psychrophiles include ... [more ▼]

Cold-adapted, or psychrophilic, organisms are able to thrive at low temperatures in permanently cold environments, which in fact characterize the greatest proportion of our planet. Psychrophiles include both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms and thus represent a significant proportion of the living world. These organisms produce cold-evolved enzymes that are partially able to cope with the reduction in chemical reaction rates induced by low temperatures. As a rule, cold-active enzymes display a high catalytic efficiency, associated however, with a low thermal stability. In most cases, the adaptation to cold is achieved through a reduction in the activation energy that possibly originates from an increased flexibility of either a selected area or of the overall protein structure. This enhanced plasticity seems in turn to be induced by the weak thermal stability of psychrophilic enzymes. The adaptation strategies are beginning to be understood thanks to recent advances in the elucidation of the molecular characteristics of cold-adapted enzymes derived from X-ray crystallography, protein engineering and biophysical methods. Psychrophilic organisms and their enzymes have, in recent years, increasingly attracted the attention of the scientific community due to their peculiar properties that render them particularly useful in investigating the possible relationship existing between stability, flexibility and specific activity and as valuable tools for biotechnological purposes. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular Basis of Neuronal Biorhythms and Paroxysms
Grisar, Thierry ULg; Lakaye, Bernard ULg; Thomas, Elizabeth

in Archives of Physiology & Biochemistry (1996), 104(6), 770-4

The molecular basis of the biorhythms are evoked in relation to cerebral EEG rhythms and paroxysms. Basic oscillatory phenomena have been well shown and modeled in systems such as the glycolytic pathway ... [more ▼]

The molecular basis of the biorhythms are evoked in relation to cerebral EEG rhythms and paroxysms. Basic oscillatory phenomena have been well shown and modeled in systems such as the glycolytic pathway, the oscillations of cAMP in amoebas and rhythms of the intracellular cycline during mitosis. In excitable cells the intracellular calcium and cAMP oscillations exhibit a signalling system with many advantages. Thus the question arises: to what extent can the EEG paroxysms observed in epileptic syndrome be due to disturbances in such basic molecular pathways that underlie intracellular molecular oscillations? The usefulness of the absence-rat-model and the implication the T type Ca(2+)-channel of the thalamic nuclei in the pathophysiology of this epileptic syndrome are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular basis of radioresistance
COUCKE, Philippe ULg

Doctoral thesis (1995)

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See detailMolecular basis of the amylose-like polymer formation catalyzed by Neisseria polysaccharea amylosucrase
Albenne, C.; Skov, L. K.; Mirza, O. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2004), 279(1), 726-734

Amylosucrase from Neisseria polysaccharea is a remarkable transglucosidase from family 13 of the glycosidehydrolases that synthesizes an insoluble amylose-like polymer from sucrose in the absence of any ... [more ▼]

Amylosucrase from Neisseria polysaccharea is a remarkable transglucosidase from family 13 of the glycosidehydrolases that synthesizes an insoluble amylose-like polymer from sucrose in the absence of any primer. Amylosucrase shares strong structural similarities with alpha-amylases. Exactly how this enzyme catalyzes the formation of alpha-1,4-glucan and which structural features are involved in this unique functionality existing in family 13 are important questions still not fully answered. Here, we provide evidence that amylosucrase initializes polymer formation by releasing, through sucrose hydrolysis, a glucose molecule that is subsequently used as the first acceptor molecule. Maltooligosaccharides of increasing size were produced and successively elongated at their nonreducing ends until they reached a critical size and concentration, causing precipitation. The ability of amylosucrase to bind and to elongate maltooligosaccharides is notably due to the presence of key residues at the OB1 acceptor binding site that contribute strongly to the guidance ( Arg(415), subsite +4) and the correct positioning (Asp(394) and Arg(446), subsite +1) of acceptor molecules. On the other hand, Arg(226) (subsites +2/+3) limits the binding of maltooligosaccharides, resulting in the accumulation of small products (G to G3) in the medium. A remarkable mutant (R226A), activated by the products it forms, was generated. It yields twice as much insoluble glucan as the wild-type enzyme and leads to the production of lower quantities of by-products. [less ▲]

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See detailA Molecular Biologic Study of Extracellular Matrix Components During the Development of Glomerulosclerosis in Murine Chronic Graft-Versus-Host Disease
Munaut, Carine ULg; Bergijk, E. C.; Baelde, J. J. et al

in Laboratory Investigation : Journal of Technical Methods & Pathology (1992), 67(5), 580-7

BACKGROUND: We studied the development of glomerulosclerosis in murine chronic graft-versus-host disease, a model for human systemic lupus erythematosus. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The disease was induced in ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: We studied the development of glomerulosclerosis in murine chronic graft-versus-host disease, a model for human systemic lupus erythematosus. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The disease was induced in (C57BL10 x DBA/2)F1 hybrids by injection of DBA/2 lymphocytes leading to deposition of auto-antibodies in the glomeruli, and a lupus type of nephritis morphologically. We have determined the levels of mRNA coding for laminin (B1 and B2), a 67 kilodalton laminin binding protein, and types I and IV collagen, in control and graft-versus host disease mice at various times after disease induction. RESULTS: Laminin and collagen mRNAs were increased in whole kidneys 4 weeks after induction of the disease. At week 10, all animals displayed dramatic stimulation of alpha 1(I), alpha 1(IV), laminin B1, and B2 mRNAs. The 67 kilodalton laminin binding protein mRNA was also doubled from week 4 to 16. In isolated glomeruli, the mRNA level coding for laminin B2 was already significantly increased from week 8. This enhancement of laminin synthesis corresponds to the mesangial expansion and to the development of laminin-containing spike formations of the glomerular basement membrane at week 8. CONCLUSIONS: The expansion of the mesangial matrix in murine chronic graft-versus-host disease is caused at least in part, by an increased production of extracellular matrix components by glomerular cells. These results demonstrate that the increase of specific extracellular matrix components mRNAs precedes light microscopic changes. Quantitative evaluation of the mRNA levels coding for extracellular matrix proteins may reveal a useful method for the early detection of the development of glomerular sclerosis at the stage preceding the onset of anatomo-clinical changes. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular biology contribution to animal production in 1994
Renaville, Robert ULg

Conference (1994)

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See detailMolecular biology in support of an old paradigm about the induction of flowering
Périlleux, Claire ULg

in Flowering Newsletter (1995), 20

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See detailMolecular Biology of Antimicrobial resistance
Melin, Pierrette ULg

Conference (1998, October)

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See detailMolecular Biology of Bovine Herpesvirus Type 4
Thiry, Etienne ULg; Bublot, M.; Dubuisson, J. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (1992), 33(1-4), 79-92

Bovine herpesvirus type 4 (BHV-4) is a ubiquitous virus of cattle. Its genome is a 144 +/- 6 kb double-stranded DNA consisting of a unique central part (L-DNA) flanked at both ends by tandem repeats ... [more ▼]

Bovine herpesvirus type 4 (BHV-4) is a ubiquitous virus of cattle. Its genome is a 144 +/- 6 kb double-stranded DNA consisting of a unique central part (L-DNA) flanked at both ends by tandem repeats called polyrepetitive DNA (prDNA or H-DNA). The overall arrangement of genes has been obtained by the analysis of homologies between short BHV-4 DNA sequences and corresponding genes of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and herpesvirus saimiri (HVS). The gene expression is temporally regulated. Glycoprotein precursor p (gp10/gp17) is expressed as gamma 1 polypeptide. Glycoproteins gp1, gp8, gp11 and their precursors are gamma 2 proteins. The analysis of strain variations allows the definition of two types of strains, based on the DNA patterns: the Movar 33/63-like and the DN 599-like strains. Only the M40 strain, isolated in India, fails to fit this classification. The genomic variations have been compiled to build a dendrogram showing three levels of divergence between BHV-4 strains or isolates. The available molecular data indicate that the BHV-4 genome shares much similarity with the DNA of EBV and HVS, two representative members of the gammaherpesvirinae. BHV-4 may therefore be classified in the subfamily gammaherpesvirinae. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular biology of HCV: past, present and future perspective
BONTEMS, Sébastien ULg

Conference (2014, October 16)

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See detailMolecular Biology of tilapia prolactins
Swennen, E.; Sekkali, B.; Poncelet, A. C. et al

in Fundamental and applied research for aquaculture (1993)

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See detailMolecular biology, phytochemistry and bioactivity of three endemic Aloe species from Mauritius and Reunion Islands.
Ranghoo-Sanmukhiya, M.; Govinden-Soulange, J.; Lavergne, C. et al

in Phytochemical Analysis (2010)

Introduction - Aloe tormentorii, A. purpurea and A. macra are used as multipurpose folk medicines in Reunion and Mauritius Islands and are mistaken for the introduced Aloe vera.Objective - To compare the ... [more ▼]

Introduction - Aloe tormentorii, A. purpurea and A. macra are used as multipurpose folk medicines in Reunion and Mauritius Islands and are mistaken for the introduced Aloe vera.Objective - To compare the phytochemical, antimicrobial and DNA profiles of Aloe endemic to Mauritius and Reunion with the profiles of A. vera.Methodology - Leaf extracts of these Aloe species were analysed using standard phytochemical screening techniques, TLC and by HPLC. These extracts were also assayed for antimicrobial activity using microdilution techniques. Genetic diversity was studied using RAPD markers.Results - Phytochemical and antimicrobial assays and RAPD analysis showed that Mascarene Aloe species were very different from A. vera.Conclusion - This study is the first report highlighting the differences between Aloe sp.p from Mascarene and Aloe vera at the metabolic and genomic level. Copyright (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular biomimetics applied to medical devices
Van de Weerdt, Cécile ULg; Vreuls, Christelle ULg; Genin, Alexis ULg et al

Poster (2012, April 18)

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See detailMolecular biomimetics applied to medical devices
Van de Weerdt, Cécile ULg; Archembeau, Catherine; Vreuls, Christelle ULg et al

Poster (2012, May 05)

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (21 ULg)