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See detailInfluence of purified dietary fibre on bacterial protein synthesis in the large intestine of pigs, as measured by the gas production technique.
Bindelle, Jérôme ULg; Buldgen, André; Michaux, David et al

in Livestock Science (2007), 109

Microbial fermentation of non-digestible carbohydrates in the pig's large intestine induces a shift of N excretion from urea in urine to bacterial protein in faeces. Experiments were carried out to ... [more ▼]

Microbial fermentation of non-digestible carbohydrates in the pig's large intestine induces a shift of N excretion from urea in urine to bacterial protein in faeces. Experiments were carried out to measure the mineral N incorporation by the pig intestinal microflora using 5 purified carbohydrates in a gas-test: starch (S), cellulose (C), inulin (I), pectin (P) and xylan (X). Fermentation kinetics was modelled. N source in the buffer solution was replaced by 15N labelled NH4Cl. The bacterial N fixation was determined at mid-fermentation, measuring 15N incorporation into the solid phase of the buffer. The bacterial N fixation was higher (Pb0.001) with I and S (19.9 and 18.1 mg N/g incubated DM), compared to P, C and X (8.7, 5.9 and 5.5 respectively). Inulin and S were fermented also more rapidly, even if I (0.081 h−1) and C (0.074 h−1) showed lower half time fractional rate of degradation than S (0.153 h−1), P (0.133 h−1) and X (0.104 h−1). The insoluble dietary fibre content of the substrates was negatively correlated to bacterial N fixation (r=−0.957, P=0.011). The high crude protein content of P (32.5 mg g−1DM) might explain the lower impact of this substrate on bacterial N fixation, despite its rapid fermentation. Beside the proportion of insoluble fibre, the N content and the rate of fermentation seem to be the major factors influencing bacterial protein synthesis. Further studies including ingredients with variable content of indigestible protein and mean retention time in the pig's intestines are necessary. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of regular soccer or swimming practice on gross motor development in childhood
Rocha, Helena; Marinho, Daniel; Jidovtseff, Boris ULg et al

in Journal Motricidade (2016), 12(4), 33-43

The objective of this study was to analyse the changes on gross motor development after five (T5), ten (T10) and 30 (T30) months of swimming or soccer practice. The study sample consists of 33 preschool ... [more ▼]

The objective of this study was to analyse the changes on gross motor development after five (T5), ten (T10) and 30 (T30) months of swimming or soccer practice. The study sample consists of 33 preschool-aged boys (4.8±0.5 yrs.): 11 soccer practitioners; 11 swimming practitioners; 11 controls (no previous involvement in sports). The Test of Gross Motor Development–Second Edition was used to assess common gross motor skills (locomotion, object control skills). Both experimental groups improved significantly in their gross motor quotient and the standard scores for locomotion and object control skills between T5 and T10. At T10, all soccer practitioners have already reached the maximum descriptive rating for the gross motor quotient. Between T10 and T30, swimming practitioners were able to improve the standard scores for object control skills. Main results showed a positive impact of swimming and soccer participation in motor proficiency. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of residual alpha-amylase activity on the pasting properties of extracted wheat starch.
Lenartz, Jonathan; Sinnaeve, Georges; Massaux, Carine et al

Poster (2005, June)

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See detailInfluence of response factors on determining equilibrium association constants of non-covalent complexes by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry
Gabelica, Valérie ULg; Galic, Nives; Rosu, Frédéric ULg et al

in Journal of Mass Spectrometry [=JMS] (2003), 38(5), 491-501

A method for determining the equilibrium association constant of a complexation reaction A + B <=> AB by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry is described. The method consists in measuring the ... [more ▼]

A method for determining the equilibrium association constant of a complexation reaction A + B <=> AB by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry is described. The method consists in measuring the relative intensities of the peaks corresponding to A and to AB in equimolar A–B solutions at different concentrations C0. The results are fitted by a non-linear least-squares procedure, with the two variable parameters being the equilibrium association constant Ka and a factor R, defined by I(AB)/I.A/ = R× [AB]/[A]. The factor R is the ratio between the response factors of AB and A, and corrects for the relative electrospray responses of the complex and the free substrate A, mass discrimination of instrumental origin and/or moderate in-source dissociation. The method is illustrated with the following two systems: complexes between a double-stranded 12-base pair oligonucleotide and minor groove binders, and cyclodextrin complexeswith a,!-dicarboxylic acids. For the oligonucleotide complexes, it is found that the response of the complex is not dramatically different to the response of the free oligonucleotide duplex, as the double helix conformation is disturbed by the drug only to a minor extent. In the case of cyclodextrin complexes, these complexes were found to have a much higher response than free cyclodextrin. This may be due to the fact that cyclodextrin is neutral in solution, whereas the complex is charged, but it can also stem from the fact that a significant proportion of the complex is in a non-inclusion geometry. The present method requires the exact determination of the concentrations of the reactants and is applicable to 1 : 1 complexes. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of response prepotency strength, general working memory resources, and specific working memory load on the ability to inhibit predominant responses: A comparison of young and elderly participants
Grandjean, Julien ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg

in Brain & Cognition (2011), 77

One conception of inhibitory functioning suggests that the ability to successfully inhibit a predominant response depends mainly on the strength of that response, the general functioning of working memory ... [more ▼]

One conception of inhibitory functioning suggests that the ability to successfully inhibit a predominant response depends mainly on the strength of that response, the general functioning of working memory processes, and the working memory demand of the task (Roberts, Hager, and Heron, 1994). The proposal that inhibition and functional working memory capacity interact was assessed in the present study using two motor inhibition tasks (Go/No-Go and response incompatibility) in young and older participants. The strength of prepotency was assessed with a short or long training phase for the response to be inhibited. The influence of working memory resources was evaluated by administering the tasks in full versus divided attention conditions. The effect of working memory load was manipulated by increasing the number of target and distracter items in each task. Results showed no effect of prepotency strength, whereas dividing attentional resources and increasing working memory load were associated with greater inhibitory effects in both groups and for both tasks. This deleterious effect was higher for older participants, except in the working memory load condition of the Go/No-Go task. These results suggest an interactive link between working memory and response inhibition by showing that taxing working memory resources increases the difficulty of inhibiting prepotent responses in younger and older subjects. The additional detrimental effect of these factors on healthy elderly subjects was related to their decreased cognitive resources and to their shorter span size. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of rhizobacterial volatile compounds on growth and root system architecture of Brachypodium distachyon (L.) Beauv.
Mendaluk, Magdalena ULg; Varin, Sébastien; Baudson, Caroline ULg et al

Poster (2013, February 08)

Many rhizobacterial strains are classified as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) and are potentially useful to enhance plant fitness and productivity. Among the mechanisms by which PGPR improve ... [more ▼]

Many rhizobacterial strains are classified as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) and are potentially useful to enhance plant fitness and productivity. Among the mechanisms by which PGPR improve plant growth, the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and their biological impacts on plants remain little documented. The aim of this work is to evaluate the growth promotion ability of 19 bacterial strains on the model grass Brachypodium distachyon Bd21 (Bd21), with a focus on this peculiar mode of interaction. A collection of 19 strains was selected for their known growth promotion potential. The impact of the rhizobacteria on the model grass was studied using an in vitro cocultivation system allowing interactions through VOCs without physical contact between plants and bacteria. The results show that the VOCs of several strains promote total biomass production, modulate biomass partitioning and affect shoot and root architecture of Bd21. The effects of the PGPR strains emitting different volatile blends were investigated via principal component analysis coupled to clustering and univariate analysis to unravel their biological effects. On the basis of volatile emissions and of their effects on plant growth, two strains have been selected in order to evaluate such interactions using an ex vitro system. The set-up of this system is in progress. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of rhizobacterial volatiles on the root system architecture and the production and allocation of biomass in the model grass Brachypodium distachyon (L.) P. Beauv.
Delaplace, Pierre ULg; Delory, Benjamin ULg; Baudson, Caroline ULg et al

in BMC Plant Biology (2015), 15(195),

Background Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria are increasingly being seen as a way of complementing conventional inputs in agricultural systems. The effects on their host plants are diverse and include ... [more ▼]

Background Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria are increasingly being seen as a way of complementing conventional inputs in agricultural systems. The effects on their host plants are diverse and include volatile-mediated growth enhancement. This study sought to assess the effects of bacterial volatiles on the biomass production and root system architecture of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon (L.) Beauv. Results An in vitro experiment allowing plant-bacteria interaction throughout the gaseous phase without any physical contact was used to screen 19 bacterial strains for their growth-promotion ability over a 10-day co-cultivation period. Five groups of bacteria were defined and characterised based on their combined influence on biomass production and root system architecture. The observed effects ranged from unchanged to greatly increased biomass production coupled with increased root length and branching. Primary root length was increased only by the volatile compounds emitted by Enterobacter cloacae JM22 and Bacillus pumilus T4. Overall, the most significant results were obtained with Bacillus subtilis GB03, which induced an 81% increase in total biomass, as well as enhancing total root length, total secondary root length and total adventitious root length by 88.5, 201.5 and 474.5%, respectively. Conclusions This study is the first report on bacterial volatile-mediated growth promotion of a grass plant. Contrasting modulations of biomass production coupled with changes in root system architecture were observed. Most of the strains that increased total plant biomass also modulated adventitious root growth. Under our screening conditions, total biomass production was strongly correlated with the length and branching of the root system components, except for primary root length. An analysis of the emission kinetics of the bacterial volatile compounds is being undertaken and should lead to the identification of the compounds responsible for the observed growth-promotion effects. Within the context of the inherent characteristics of our in vitro system, this paper identifies the next critical experimental steps and discusses them from both a fundamental and an applied perspective. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of rhizosphere-specific parameters on surfactin production by Bacillus subtilis.
Nihorimbere, V.; Fickers, Patrick ULg; Thonart, Philippe ULg et al

Conference (2008, September)

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See detailInfluence of rhizosphere-specific parameters on surfactin production by Bacillus subtilis.
Ongena, MARC ULg; Nihorimbere, Venant; Fickers, Patrick ULg et al

in Bulletin OILB/SROP = IOBC/WPRS Bulletin (2009), (43), 317-320

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See detailInfluence of salt restriction in untreated essential hypertension patients
Krzesinski, Jean-Marie ULg; Du, F.; Pequeux, L. et al

in Journal of Hypertension (1992), 10(10), 1297-1298

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See detailInfluence of sampling effort on saproxylic beetle diversity assessment: Implications for insect monitoring studies in European temperate forests
Parmain, G.; Dufrêne, Marc ULg; Brin, A. et al

in Agricultural & Forest Entomology (2013)

Saproxylic beetle diversity monitoring provides a tool for estimating the efficiency of forest conservation measures. Flight interception traps are commonly employed to monitor beetle assemblages ... [more ▼]

Saproxylic beetle diversity monitoring provides a tool for estimating the efficiency of forest conservation measures. Flight interception traps are commonly employed to monitor beetle assemblages, although little explicit knowledge of the efficiency of this trapping method is available. The present study investigated how slight changes in sampling effort can influence species richness and species composition of assemblages in data sets from standard window-flight traps. At both trap and plot levels, an additional year or an additional trap provided a 50% increase in the number of species detected (a 75% increase for rare species) and resulted in a different estimated composition of the assemblages. Adding 2 or 3years of sampling gave twice as many species and resulted in assemblages that were 50% dissimilar. Increases in the detection of species and the dissimilarity of assemblages were similarly affected along a gradient of forest conditions, suggesting that changes in sampling effort were not affected by forest condition. At the forest level, year or trap replication provided smaller increases in species richness (31% and 25%, respectively). Within sites, distance measures in species composition between traps did not differ significantly when based on 1 or 2years of data. Using two traps per plot compared with one trap influenced comparisons between stand types, based on species richness, in 25% of the cases. Species detection was similarly increased by either year replication or trap replication. The results of the present study highlight the significant role played by finescale patterns of habitat structure and inter-annual variation with respect to determining catch size and assemblages of saproxylic species. © 2013 The Royal Entomological Society. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of sawdust addition on drying of wastewater sludges: Comparison of structural characteristics
Li, Jie; Plougonven, Erwan ULg; Fraikin, Laurent ULg et al

in Drying Technology (2017), 35(8), 925-932

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See detailInfluence of sedatives, anticonvulsants and a negative chronotrope on transcranial doppler ultrasonography
de Laat, B. W. G. A.; Gommeren, Kris ULg; Denies, S. et al

in Proceedings of the 22nd ECVIM-CA Congress (2012, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (3 ULg)